Border crossing costs





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  1. #1
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    Default Border crossing costs

    Hi all,

    A group of us (old school friends of 50 years standing) are doing a trip starting in a few weeks' time through Makgadigadi, Kasane, Vic Falls, Kafue, Lower Zambezi, South Luangwa, Lake Malawi, Gorongoza and the Mozambican coastline down to Maputo Elephant Reserve. Four vehicles, nine people and seven weeks. We're girls and boys (at our age that sounds better than men and women!) and we're camping all the way.

    I have gleaned a great deal of value from various threads on the forum, particularly regarding Kafue (in fact, I discovered the forum by googling for answers to some of my questions), but I have been unable to establish with certainty just what costs are involved at the various border crossings. Even the AA have provided vague and sometimes conflicting information. Reading between the lines on the forum, it seems that there are many surprises and unexpected costs that arise.

    My biggest concern involves Zimbabwe. Some of our group have never seen the Vic Falls and it has been nine years ago since I was there. Could someone give me an indication as to whether it would be excessively expensive from a border-crossing perspective, to travel from Kasane to Vic Falls, camp there for a couple of nights and then cross into Zambia? Or should one leave your vehicles at Kasane and take one of those day trips to the falls, then return and cross at Kasangulu Ferry? The day trips from Kasane sound expensive to me, but with the hidden costs of taking your own vehicle through, plus the risk of unwarranted fines from belligerent Zim Police because a refelector sticker is not straight enough, it may be cheaper than taking our own vehicles. I last crossed on the ferry at Kazangulu eleven years ago, and that was before the long queues of trucks. I'd hate for us to spend two days waiting to get across!

    But perhaps the Falls would be better viewed from the Zambian side and Zimbabwe avoided altogether? I've seen the falls from both sides and I'd really like those who've never seen them to also get the Zimbabwean view.

    I anticipate less costs when crossing from Zambia to Malawi and Malawi to Mozambique, but I understand from something I read in a report by MikeAG on the forum that there is a substantial cost involved in taking a vehicle into Zambia. Could someone perhaps give me some tips, guidance or advice on this? Pensioners obviously count their pennies and if we had accurate and up-to-date figures to work on it would help us to spend where we're going to get best value.

    Also, could someone give me a fairly recent cost for fuel (both petrol and diesel) in Botswana, Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique? I understand that in Zambia and Malawi it costs double what we pay in SA.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    McGill




  2. #2
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    Mc Gill

    I am completely jealous of you boys and girls going on such an extensive trip! We returned two weeks ago.

    I wish I could have exact amounts for you, but I am the type of guy that do not remember tiny details like borders costs. But maybe I can be of help. My figures is what I can "remember".

    I towed a trailer. I also took out thrid party insurance beforehand from the AA.

    The (Cofesa+Moz) insurance came to about R1700 for Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and Moz. You will pay less if not towing. This made life slightly easier on borders. If I remember correctly, I've paid for a period of 60 days as I wasnt sure how long the trip eventually would be.

    Botswana: BwP 270 for double entry with trailer. Paid in Pula.
    Zambia: Came to over R1000 taking the insurance into consideration. You pay four seperate taxes/insurance at seperate offices! (including insurance) US$ for some and Rands for some. Engine size also influence rates.

    Malawi: About sixty rand without the insurance - but you have to pay it in Malawi Kwatcha. Lots of people that exchange money before the border. The one I bumped into told me that I had to have a lot of kwatcha and I bought KW 10000 (R520)beforehand which were unnessesary. Luckilly I knew the rate - he wanted to "loop my in", but I just stuck to my rate and I got it exchaged at the rate you get at the bank.

    Mozambique: I cannot remember how much, but it wasnt a lot at all, becuase I had the insurance - US $

    Zimbabwe: Also a negligable amount as insurance were already covered - US $

    I would defnitely go into Zimbabwe. Police were always curtious. Maybe not as friendly as the Zambian counterparts. Just slow down long before you are instructed to stop. Give a nice smile and you will be fine. They checked my licence three tiimes in a 150km sterch, but just go with the flow. Dont look in a hurry. A compliment of the country/people do wonders!

    Diesel were about $ 1.15 in Zim, about R11 in Zambia and R12 in Malawi. You pay cash in local currency - the US$ being the "local currency" in Zim. Botswana were about 5.50BWP/l if I remember correctly. In all these countries, petrol seems to be 15% more expensive. Only some stations in Botswana take VISA or Master card.

    If you have spesific questions - send me a PM and I will send you my phone number/email address. Also check my trip report and photos:
    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...ad.php?t=61927

    Bostoe
    Last edited by bostoe; 2010/07/24 at 10:55 AM.

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    Entrance fees at national parks in Zambia came to $US 30 per adult and $15 for the vehicle. South Luangwa was our favourite!

    Somebody else told me they had a budget of about R1000 per day for a family of four. We came to about that after adding all up. But - at most campsites we did not pay for the children.

    Your biggest single expense being fuel, I think your cost per day can come down quite drasticly if you spend more time there - sounds like a bargain to me!

    Why not miss out on the Kazangula ferry and go through Katima. Easy border posts and no long que's?

    Bostoe
    Last edited by bostoe; 2010/07/24 at 10:44 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by McGill View Post
    A group of us (old school friends of 50 years standing) are doing a trip starting in a few weeks' time through Makgadigadi, Kasane, Vic Falls, Kafue, Lower Zambezi, South Luangwa, Lake Malawi, Gorongoza and the Mozambican coastline down to Maputo Elephant Reserve. Four vehicles, nine people and seven weeks.

    but I understand from something I read in a report by MikeAG on the forum that there is a substantial cost involved in taking a vehicle into Zambia.

    Hi, and welcome to the forum.

    Firstly, that is a great trip you've got lined up. Take it steady, don't plan too much, and be prepared to stay an extra few days if you find somewhere you like. You really don't need to book much in Zambia. Where are you planning to go in the Kafue?

    When are you going? I'm back in that neck of the woods in a few weeks......

    Costs for a vehicle into Zambia were as follows (I found this on a scrap of paper the other day........I don't normally look too closely at this sort of stuff, like Bostoe):

    Carbon Tax Kw150,000= $30
    Road tax N$2 = $2
    Insurance Kw112,500 =$22
    Council Levy $N50 = $6
    Total $60

    So, not too bad............but don't forget your visa fees (esp. if you have UK citizens with you) and there is a cross-border charge in Namibia which used to be N$180 per crossing ($20ish).

    This was a year ago, and may have changed..........they seldom go down!!!

    The border itself is chaotic, but friendly and easy to negotiate if you are smiley and positive. Don't go in looking rushed or hassled, and NEVER demand, order, or bang the desk!!! You need to go into 3 or 4 different buildings, including a derelict caravan where you fall through the floor. The officials will change money for you if necessary, at a better rate than the un-official money changers outside. Be organised with your currency............it is worthwhile having 3 or 4 (seriously!) different wallets, one for each currency. The cheap coloured nylon things would be ideal. The prices they quote you are legitimate, and aren't negotiable. Please don't treat the officials as though they are trying to seek bribes or earn additional money.......they aren't.

    Mike

    Edit .....sorry, I missed the Kazangula reference......I was describing Katima/ Sesheke. At Kazangula, don't queue behind the trucks. Drive to the front of the queue. This is legitimate, because the ferry can only take one or two trucks, plus a few cars.......so there are in essence two seperate queues running. I would suggest, like Bostoe, that you head to Katima, and then run up the Zambezi to Mongu before turning right on the tar into the heart of the Kafue (or maybe go to Liuwa Plains?). That road up the Zambezi is gorgeous......
    Last edited by MikeAG; 2010/07/24 at 11:21 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeAG View Post
    ........but don't forget your visa fees (esp. if you have UK citizens with you)
    Goodness me - there is a place where it is beneficial to have a SA passport!!!

    Yes Mike - That delapedated Jurgens Caravan at Sesheke is the ultimate! I loved it!

    Bostoe
    Last edited by bostoe; 2010/07/24 at 11:54 AM.

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    Thanks guys - you've really helped a lot! I feel more comfortable about entering Zim in our own vehicles now, and I've got a far better idea of border crossing costs. I'm not too sure what a PM is, Bostoe, (ek is maar dom met hierdie rekenaar goed!) but I'd love to make contact and chat, either by phone or e-mail. Took me a couple of hours to figure out how to open a thread and post an enquiry, mainly because I don't understand the jargon! But I think I've got it taped now. Must say that in the process I read a lot of really interesting stuff that others had posted!

    Bostoe, I think we'll have to skip Katima if we go into Zim, though I would love to vist the place again - memories of another life in another world!

    MikeAG, we're entering Botswana on 16 August and expect to reach the Kafue area about 23 August. We've only planned on about four days there, but our itinerary is fairly flexible and we'll see how it goes. Because some of our guys are still working (others, like myself, are retired and have more time available), not all can do the whole trip with us. So I've divided it into three legs, and we've got people joining and leaving at the end/start of each leg. But we remain four vehicles and between eight to 10 people for each leg. Some vehicles and some people will change, but others, like myself, my wife and my trusty old Isuzu hope to last all the way. The start and end of each leg is our only limiting factor, but unfortunately it was the only way we could do it. I have built in some leeway though, in case of delays or deciding to stay longer along the way. However, if you're in the area, we'd just love to bump into you (let me rephrase that - we'd love to meet up with you!).

    We'll probably travel from Livingston to Kalomo, then to Itezhi Tezhi. We had planned to go in at the South Entrance and overnight at Nanzhila Camp, but when I e-mailed them they said they do not offer camping, and camping in the bush in the park is not allowed. Someone else suggested we follow a track outside the park, but along its eastern edge, saving on entrance fees, but if there are things to see, we'd rather be inside the park.

    Didn't know about McBrides, but after reading some of your stuff and what others have written, I think we have to fit a visit in. We were planning to travel up from ItezhiTezhi to spend a couple of days at Lufupa before leaving through the northern gate and circling around to Lusaka for the end of our first leg. We'd been told that we could do a really great river cruise quite cheaply at Lufupa, but all the talk of how "crowded" it gets has put me off. Maybe just one night before crossing the Busunga Plains? We're sedate old fogies who enjoy peace, quiet and solitude in the bush and don't relish being subjected to noisy, loutish gapers!

    Thanks again for the inputs. I was wary of posting my requests, as I thought I might cause the Mods trouble if I posted onto the General Forum, but couldn't find another that seemed to fit.

    I'll do a trip report when we get back, if that might be of use to anyone.

    McGill

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    Well, ideally the Overland forum for this one, but if the mods are bothered they will move it. Newcomers are always forgiven!

    You are going to be a month ahead of me, so we won't meet. Don't miss McBrides. Whatever you do, you must go there. They do the boat rides.........drifts they call them, and they are two of the greatest wildlife experts in Africa. You will be in the smallest possible group, on a completely quiet uncrowded part of the river.........it is sheer paradise. They will also take you on small guided walks. They seldom do game drives. Lufupa....well, you might have some great sightings, but it wasn't for me. It isn't noisy and loutish, but I found it very commercialised, and a bit dull. We did have a great lion sighting near there though.

    Also, as you are going up the river road from Itezhi Tezhi you will be going right past the door of Linda at Mukambi, who is Thirstie on the forum...........It would be rude not to drop in there for a visit!! Pop in to Kaingu as well, for the most gorgeous location you will ever see. At least have a drink there, overhanging a beautiful bend in the river. The wildlife doesn't really start in earnest until a little north of Kaingu.

    For a fuller picture of Nanzhila, send a PM to Tony Weaver who visited a couple of years ago.

    For an idea of whether Lufupa-Busanga-northern exit to McBrides is doable or sensible, get hold of Linda (Thirstie). The thing is, Busanga is different every year (it is flooded annually for at least 7 or 8 months). I am just not sure I would want to be wandering around up there by myself..........there are no reliable maps, obviously. The easiest way to find your way around the area is to stick to the tracks around the outside of the plain, at the tree-line............but you miss out on the jaw-dropping beauty and splendour of the plains if you do this. Talk to Linda, and point her in the direction of this thread.

    As for enjoying peace, quiet and solitude, then that part of Zambia really will be ideal for you. You can feel like you are alone in the world.

    Oh, and a trip report with photos is compulsory

    Mike
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    Sorry we'll miss you, Mike! Could you give me an idea of just where McBrides is located so that I can plan our route accordingly? What are their prices like? Is there a website or an e-mail address where I can get info on them? I was just going to change our route to go up the Sioma-Mongu road that you described so enticingly, but now I don't want to miss Linda, so perhaps we'll stick to Itezhi Tezhi! I'll follow up with Thirstie on the forum - might take me a little while to figure out how to do it - still not sure what a PM is! Just figured it out after first barging into one of her threads, then clicking on Thirstie's name! Private Message! I learn by banging my head!

    McGill

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    McGill,

    If you go to the Zambian section of the forum, in Overlanding, you will find a thread that I maintain here at the very top of the page. In it are links to all of the Zambian lodges and campsites that I have been informed of or have visited myself, and the McBrides site is on there. Also in the Zambian section is my trip report from last year.

    It sounds as though you need to grab yourself a map, too, and I am sure there is one in the Zambian section (found it!)..........again, from Linda. Anyway, McBrides is on the Kafue river, slightly south of due east from Lufupa.......but is accessed by road from Mumbwa. I guess it is around 90 km NW of Mumbwa. Mumbwa is about 130 km to the east of the Chunga gate which is at the bridge where the main east west road (Mongu to Lusaka) crosses the Kafue River.

    If you head up the Zambezi to Mongu and then across, you will find yourself going right past the door of Linda at Mukambi. I guess your choice is drive up the Zambezi (via Sioma Falls, of course, and the pontoon..........ferry to you and me..........at Sitoti) or drive up the gorgeous river road alongside the Kafue River. Tough one.......but maybe I'd go for the river road.

    Thinking about Lufupa and McBrides a bit more.........I know it is possible to get to Lufupa and be picked up by the McBrides boat and taken to their camp. You could leave your car at Lufupa, I guess, and go up the river to McB's, then back to the car at the end of your trip. I would guess at 25 to 30 km by river, compared with hundreds by road. However, this wouldn't be an option if you have roof-tents and were determined to camp. You'd have to stay in their huts.

    I have alerted Linda to this thread, but you can of course communicate with her via PM or the email address on her website (link on the Zambian page, as I mentioned earlier).

    Mike
    Last edited by MikeAG; 2010/07/25 at 12:42 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bostoe View Post
    Goodness me - there is a place where it is beneficial to have a SA passport!!!

    Yes Mike - That delapedated Jurgens Caravan at Sesheke is the ultimate! I loved it!

    Bostoe
    Hi Bostoe,

    Those visa fees used to be far worse for us Brits. It used to be something like $150 per person for a single entry I think, from memory....... that was in retaliation for the UK having high visa fees for Zambian citizens. So, I'm grateful for small mercies that the fees are what they are now.

    Last time I crossed that border at Sesheke, I noticed that they were building a new border post on the Zambian side. It looked really posh. However, they don't seem to be using it yet by all accounts.

    Mike
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    Hi McGill,

    Great to have you on the forum and delighted you are coming to visit beautiful Zambia!

    Mike pointed your thread out and asked me to have a read. What an awesome trip! And isn't it wonderful that Zimabwe is viable again as it makes for a great "loop". Mike's advice has been spot on all the way including the trip up the Zambezi. If you are planning on carrying fishing rods you can stop at Nina's Camp, Kabula Lodge or Sioma Camp and do some fishing! Or just take in the scenery and take a boat trip to the falls which are some of the best falls in Zambia After Sioma I would leg it to the Kafue as there is not much to see and nowhere to stay that is of significance in between. If you are keen to do this route I will post distances between camps as well as road conditions.

    Your trip would then bring you out at the central Kafue and you are at a bit of a "Gateway" to the park. You can go north or south as you wish.

    Having said this, travelling through the south of the park is an adventure on its own! However, I am stumped about the camping at Nanzhila as the closing of their campsite is highly unexpected and very, very recent! This will put a proverbial spanner in the works as you can't, as you have already mentioned, wild camp in the park along the way. This would mean you would have to do Livingstone/Kazangula to It Tezhi in a day. This is doable but becomes a haul rather than a scenic trundle. I will see if I can find out more and do a separate post.

    Dirk, is it not possible to move this post to the Zambia section or the general overland section? The route that McGill is doing is becoming more and more popular and his post is a bit lost here.

    I am also going to copy and paste a very recent email I received from people who stayed with us. It has very up to day info for everyone to look at.

    Please email me direct if you have any further question but it is always nice to have the info on the forum for other members to follow. Things change so fast in Africa - from road conditions to border fees and so on - that up to date info is so very valuable.

    Bye for now
    Linda
    Last edited by Thirstie; 2010/07/25 at 07:55 AM.

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    Hi all,


    I am sure Linda (Raceway) will post a trip report with even more detail but here is her feedback to me. I hope the content is ok with the Moderators....!


    Ta
    Linda







    LUFUPA - We were out of Lufupa by 07h00 - the campsite is terrible - open plan no privacy - one big car park. The lodge itself is very nice to cater for overseas tourists - staff exceptionally friendly doing their wilderness safaries bit. Also a lot of locals moved in for the long weekend with their speed boats etc. So we high tailed it out of there. Went for a night drive - staff very informative and tried very hard

    MCBRIDES was stunning - what makes the camp is the characters - nice and remote and exactly what we were looking for. The campsite ablutions had one thing lacking and that was place to hang your towel, put down toiletries etc. Went for walks, boat trips, game drives - staff also very knowledgeable

    Its difficult to say how long it took us from Lufupa to Mcbrides as we did a lot of game viewing and loop roads - we were also advised by a local tour operator at the gate that we could not get thro all the way north if we went via the Busanga plains (too wet) - it was latish so did not take a chance and went on the tar road - was about 310 km I think - but we were there by 16h00. However a couple of days later Charlotte contacted you for some guests (Peter Wilson group) she had and you advised it was clear to come thro - Going thro the park from Lufupa to Mcbrides the gps said 250 km. We made good friends with the Peter Wilson group - from Kafue they were going to Luangwa then back to Plettenberg bay via Zimbabwe - they were on a 10 week trip. When they get back and I am in contact with them I will check on whether they got thro okay.

    NANZHILA - only managed to leave Mcbrides at about 10h30. So took the main Izi tezi road, which was fun !!!! I have got a ruptured disc and two bulging discs so took a bit of strain on this road. We got to Nanzhila at 18h00 - so we could not dwadle. The campsite also stunning - they have got 4 campsites, each with its own private ablutions (bucket shower/long drop) but spacious, lots of hanging places, shelves for toiletries etc. We had only planned 1 night but ended up staying 4. Nice lot of loop roads to view game and we saw lots - huge herds of roan / sable, lots wildebeest - other usual buck - family of bushpig, honey badger. Missed the lions but they left their evidence of vultures and hyaena. Leopard calling nearly every night. Lots elephant - everyone says the south had no game - let them believe that and we will have the place to ourselves!! Pierre had just started as Manager but a really good people person so I think he will do well.

    KAINGU - we spent 3 nights there - Egbert and Tom great people - the river and the channels magnificient. Did lots of boat trips and walks. Did not drive the area much, but doing the river road to you guys was magic - also saw lots of game in the GMA. Campsites also with own private abulutions and very nice.

    MUKAMBI - we only spent 1 night with you guys, had the best meal in the whole trip (roast potatoes/fillet was excellent), we stayed in campsite 5 which was the most remote/secluded, ablutions excellent. Campsite was a bit exposed but great right on the river - need a couple more trees around to give a bit of privacy. Your guides were the most knowledgeable of all the guides we had - they certainly new their birds.

    On the whole everybody was exceptionally friendly and went out of their way for us. As local normal South Africans we do not have the option of booking into the chalets/lodges as with the park and camping fees it works out to US150 x 8 = R1200 for 2 people for 1 night (park fees etc for 2 days). Please dont get me wrong conservation needs the funds which is why its acceptable. But I really wish there was a better SADC rate. For us its not an issue on money - its the fact that you have this wilderness to yourself which I am willing to pay for. Kafue is like Okavango swamps was 25 years ago, and I hope and pray that it stays like that. Lodges were asking 150/180 per person US plus US 110 park fees (1 night - 2 days) - makes it an expensive excursion - R3280 - 2 people 1 night in a grass/reed hut/safari tent. In Livingstone we paid US150 for 2 of us in a safari tent ex meals but incl breakfast.

    Although we camped at all the lodges we did loads of activities and had meals and drinks so hope that we supported the lodges.

    We also had the opportunity meeting Peter Moss - what a great person. We were captivated by his stories of the 1970's in the park.

    In comparison with Bots, we have been fortunate to experience the fly in "Okavango Swamps" camps - but its not our type of holiday - we want remote, basic facilities which are clean. I can eat crayfish or Sushi in the JHB - I dont need it in the bush. In Kasane at Kubu Lodge on the way home - it cost P839 for chalet and P370 for dinner (3 course meal) and P180 for drinks (R1610 in total). We had planned to camp in Chobe for couple of days but stayed in Kafue longer so when we left Nanzhila it was straight home. On our way up we stayed at Khama Rhino and Central Kalahari for couple days - also very remote - bring your own water. The park fees for Bots were P120 pp and vehicle P50 - so R672 per night for 2 people 1 night as opposed to R1200 in Kafue or R310 in Namibia.

    I have camped my whole life and have found that there has been an enormous change in attitude in African countries with regards to tourism and how important people and the money they bring in are, which makes border crossings/road blocks etc far easier than in the past. So thats important for the country to educate their civil servants - whether its police, borders etc the need to realise that the foreign cars are bringing investment into the country. We have never had a problem with "officials" cause we have the right attitude, you mentioned those SA 's who arrived and had been harassed by police - thats detrimental to your business. They go home to their mates and "scare" the next load of potential tourists. I worked in Aviation for 15 years dealing with African countries for landing and overflight clearances and all the corruption so I am aware of that issue. Rod and I have never ever paid a bribe, the only thing I have paid is a "runner" going thro a busy Mozambique border cause of the portugeuse - they do everything, fill in all the forms etc for R50 - you basically stay in your car.

    We also met the Zamiba tourism CEO he was astounded that the campsites were full of south africans. I think the lodges always think of overseas guests (which pay the bills) but they dont realise the huge market of the local SADC countries..

    We fortunately can travel outside of school holiday/peak periods so generally have never made any bookings for accommodation. I run my own business and know the pitfalls - business in SA for the last 2 years has been very hard, lots of liquidations and retrenchments. Things are going to get worse as now we have to pay for all these soccer stadiums. But I did notice very few people in Kafue which is a concern as the lodges need to survive for conservation to survive. Kaingu was the busiest, all with locals and I think the fact that you dont pay park fees obviously makes a difference.

    My final summary, its not about seeing lots game, but the fact that there is nothing for miles around that is my attraction. We certainly will be back, from Nanzhila to my front door was 1651 km's - bit far for a weekend so will have to plan a month - roll on SADC rates

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    Geez, I hope McGill can now find his thread. Mmm, think I will PM him...

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    Thanks, Mike and Linda,

    I really appreciate all the trouble you guys are going to. You're giving me enormous help! As you see, Linda, I found my thread - thanks for telling me where it had been moved to. I see I can move it myself, and once I've figured out how I may just do that, as it concerns Bots, Zim, Mal and Moz as well as Zam. That was why I had difficulty deciding where to start it in the first place. But right now I'mtrying to get the Zam section into place, so it can stay where it is.

    Will work through your comments and try to digest everything, share it with the others (we're from PE, Hermanus, Jo'burg and Pretoria, with one each joining us from NZ and Oz for this first leg, so it takes a while to disseminate info and take decisions that keep everyone happy) and make some decisions. I'm still wondering whether to recommend to them that we do the Zambezi River/Sioma Falls route or the Kafue River/Nanzhila route to get to KNP. When your choice involves two marvellous options, I like to mull over it for a while and enjoy the prospects of both before I decide!

    Will be in touch again soon.

    McGill

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    What? Aussies involved? Well, that changes everything.......The best way to get to Mukambi is via Timbuktu and Cairo, and the best way to avoid tsetses is to wear dark vests (singlets) and keep moving around

    Seriously for a moment, leave this thread where it is because all the replies have focussed on Zambia, and start new ones in the Zim, Malawi and Botswana sections where appropriate. You can just copy and paste your questions from here.

    Don't forget in all this planning that fuel is the biggest issue in the area. Livingstone, Lusaka and Mongu are the only 100% reliable fuel stops. After that Mumbwa and Itezhi Tezhi are generally OK, and Kaoma has some now and again. I don't know about Kalomo. There is no fuel at Sesheke, but if you are crossing from Katima then they have loads there, and 100% reliable. You really should have capacity for at least 160 litres, preferably in long-range tanks rather than jerries. The lodges can't and won't supply fuel.

    Mike
    "A poxy, feral, Brit architect who drinks bad beer and supports the wrong rugby team." Tony Weaver

    "Mike for President" Freeflyd

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    I have just heard from Nanzhila, and someone has got hold of the wrong end of the stick!!

    They definately still have camping, and have no plans to change that.

    Mike
    "A poxy, feral, Brit architect who drinks bad beer and supports the wrong rugby team." Tony Weaver

    "Mike for President" Freeflyd

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    This is indeed good news! Thanks for that, Mike. I'm afraid that it was me who got the wrong end of the stick. I sent them an e-mail in March, enquiring as to whether they provided camping, whether they would be able to accommodate a group our size and what the costs would be. I received a prompt but very curt reply from " Megan" stating only that they did not book camping. I had not asked for a reservation, it was merely an enquiry. So I sent them another e-mail, asking if there was anywhere in the southern section of KNP where we could camp. I never got any reply to that, so I assumed that there just was no camping. Wrong assumption! Sorry to have caused consternation - I guess I should have found the Forum earlier!

    McGill

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    A correction Mike, fuel at Kaoma is about 99.9% reliable. I have never heard of problems except during the nationwide shortages. The owners there are very organised, unlike the ones in Mumbwa! If I am given at least 10 days notice I can bring in from Lusaka at no extra cost but I do need to know in advance.

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    Has that changed then Linda, or is it just my addled brain? I have it in my diary from last year that Kaoma often forgot to order fuel, and they certainly didn't have any diesel when we came through.

    The general point is, folks, as has been said so many times before.........have a large capacity (at least 150 litres), and fill up every time you get the chance.

    Mike
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    "Mike for President" Freeflyd

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    Yes, there is always a chance but like I said, it is normally ok. If Mongu has fuel then Koama generally has as the tankers go straight past.

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