Two Stroke Oil Added to diesel - Page 3





Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 73
  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Welgelegen, Cape Town
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,861

    Default

    How often do you add the two stroke oil, every time you fill up?

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jo'burg
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johanvb View Post
    How often do you add the two stroke oil, every time you fill up?
    Yes. You don't want to risk getting paraffin diluted diesel the one time you actually skip putting it in.
    SWAMBO
    2009 Suzuki Grand Vitara 3.2i V6 Auto
    Me
    2003 Ford Focus 2.0

    Eurard: For T=2; T=1 but, 1/2T=

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Welgelegen, Cape Town
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,861

    Default

    Thanks Redliner but every time you fill up, once a month?

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Springs
    Age
    60
    Posts
    16,728

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLineR View Post
    I've always advised against this for a couple of reasons.

    1: Petrol engine components show no indication of premature failure due to too little lubrication
    there have been a lot of discussion around the agressive nature of especially Sasol or sasol blend fuels in away from the coastal areas.
    the alcohol has a very high "detergent" value and unlike petrol extracted from oil, the petrol seems corrosive and extremely low in lubricity.
    comparing the feel of the oil vs coal derived petrol, the coal derived petrol has no "oily" feel to it.
    in fact, figures of some 75%+ alcohol content in the fuel is banded about.
    pistons rely on lubrication to prevent seizing up. injectors move just as fast and has petrol flowing through its innards. with a fuel offering no lubrication to the moving parts, high wear and tear and poor performance could be expected. 200 ml / 90 l petrol seems insignificant but i believe just adds a little bit of lubrication to the petrol aiding the operation of the injectors, pump and other components in direct contact with the petrol.
    i need no lab reports to prove what i have observed. no noticeable smoking, improved fuel consumption, better response, easier starting and no indication on the spark plugs of oil contamination, unnatural discolouration or indications of abnormal wear patterns.

    imo the cost of adding 2 stroke is quickly made up by benefits.

    Land Rovers never die, they simply become organ donors!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    PRETORIA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    514

    Default

    Hi,feels like the day before my first was born,filling up with diesel/2 stroke today.Just one problem,went to Engen garage....self mix 2stoke (no grade),went to Shell garage ..Advantage 2stroke (no grade),went to Sasol garage (no grade)...what to put in....not going to pour in any old 2stroke...most of them does not even say mineral or synthetic!
    "The darkest places in hell is reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crises" Dante Alghieri


    Defender Puma 110 2.4 White 2011

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Springs
    Age
    60
    Posts
    16,728

    Default

    i normally buy a litre of Sasol synthetic 2 stroke which lasts 5 tanks (about 2 months)
    it is worth looking for a decent make.
    Last edited by Landyluvver; 2010/05/15 at 11:11 AM. Reason: add

    Land Rovers never die, they simply become organ donors!

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    45
    Posts
    170

    Default

    I would not use synthetic, I have been told that synthetic tends to accumulate water over time - water & diesel not good idea. Can anyone else confirm if this is true? Anyone flying micro-lights? the same should holt true for them as water in the fuel is critical when flying
    2000 Pajero 3.5 Blister
    2002 Disco2 TD5


  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Springs
    Age
    60
    Posts
    16,728

    Default

    most fuels are hydrocarbons and have an affinity to moisture therefore and fuel naturally accumulate water over time. important to have fuel filters that seperate water from the fuel. nice feature on the Mazda (as i am sure many other modern diesels) has a bleed screw on the filter. when the water indicator lights up, stop and unsrew the bleedscrew, drain the water and then pump the filter to get rid of air and start and carry on driving. if there is a lot of water in the fuel, it simply means more frequent stops.

    could not find the relevant section in the RAVE but guess looking at the diesel filter that water can be removed by unscrewing the water sensor from the bottom of the fuel filter.
    unplug the wires, unscrew the sensor and drain the water. refit the sender and plug in again.

    Land Rovers never die, they simply become organ donors!

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jo'burg
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lencilliers View Post
    I would not use synthetic, I have been told that synthetic tends to accumulate water over time - water & diesel not good idea. Can anyone else confirm if this is true? Anyone flying micro-lights? the same should holt true for them as water in the fuel is critical when flying
    I was a micro-light instructor.

    Used to fly only on TTS.
    The only nono was that you can't mix full synth (TTS) premix with a mineral premix, as it could gel in the tank or float bowls.
    Other than that, a good 2-stroke is a good 2-stroke, and in the ratios you're talking about in diesel, I'd use just about anything, but I'd prefer a rated 2-stroke, like a TCW3 or something.
    I know some pilots kept their microlights on "super chainsaw", thought I stuck with TTS.
    Last edited by RedLineR; 2010/05/16 at 09:05 PM.
    SWAMBO
    2009 Suzuki Grand Vitara 3.2i V6 Auto
    Me
    2003 Ford Focus 2.0

    Eurard: For T=2; T=1 but, 1/2T=

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    3rd Rock from the Sun
    Age
    44
    Posts
    301

    Default

    Do you use the 2-stroke that you get at the garrage, I ask this becasue I ride a 2 stroke offroad bike and I use a sinthetic 2-stroke oil which is better for the motor so is this true if you mix it in the 4x4's diesel.

  11. #51
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Springs
    Age
    60
    Posts
    16,728

    Default

    may be my own perception but the synthetic is probably more pure than the equivalent non synthetic.

    Land Rovers never die, they simply become organ donors!

  12. #52
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jo'burg
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    there have been a lot of discussion around the agressive nature of especially Sasol or sasol blend fuels in away from the coastal areas.
    I have seen some of these discussions. With some insinuating that there's coal dust in the fuel. Absolute nonsense. Sasol is not made by grinding up coal and adding water.

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    the alcohol has a very high "detergent" value and unlike petrol extracted from oil, the petrol seems corrosive and extremely low in lubricity.
    comparing the feel of the oil vs coal derived petrol, the coal derived petrol has no "oily" feel to it.
    in fact, figures of some 75%+ alcohol content in the fuel is banded about.
    Yet I've seen no facts around this. "Oily feel" means nothing. And at 1:200 2-stroke I can't imagine suddenly gaining an "oily feel".
    Figures banded about are just that. Banded about figures with no facts to back them. In the 70s when high alcohol content was introduced in fuels there was not a lubrication problem. But the alcohol did react with some of the materials in carbs for instance. This was easily sorted.

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    pistons rely on lubrication to prevent seizing up.
    100%. The engine is equipped with an oil pump and sump with oil to prevent this.

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    injectors move just as fast and has petrol flowing through its innards. with a fuel offering no lubrication to the moving parts, high wear and tear and poor performance could be expected.
    I am unaware of this happening anywhere. Certainly in all my vehicles through the last 15 years or so I have never experienced any wear or breakdowns to anything I can remotely ascribe to fuel lubricity.
    Ditto for my old man's vehicles, which adds another 40years to that.

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    200 ml / 90 l petrol seems insignificant but i believe just adds a little bit of lubrication to the petrol aiding the operation of the injectors, pump and other components in direct contact with the petrol.
    I am unaware of any significant amount of break downs that would back this claim.

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    i need no lab reports to prove what i have observed.
    What exactly do you think you have observed? Petrol engines (4-stroke) work fine without 2-stroke. At best you've observed that 2-stroke doesn't harm an engine. And without a lab report you simply made a subjective observation based on no facts at all.
    To simply dismiss science does not strengthen your case.

    Quote Originally Posted by landyluvver View Post
    no noticeable smoking, improved fuel consumption, better response, easier starting and no indication on the spark plugs of oil contamination, unnatural discolouration or indications of abnormal wear patterns.

    imo the cost of adding 2 stroke is quickly made up by benefits.
    And I achieve the exact same without 2-stroke in my fuel.
    I have seen no benefits of adding 2-stroke to petrol. And though you may not notice smoke at low dilution, it doesn't mean that it isn't there.
    And in modern petrol engines with catalytic converters that range from R11000 - R45000 each, would you be willing to guarantee a reader that you will pay for his cats should they become blocked due to 2-stroke use in petrol? Would you be willing to fork out the R45000 once his cat does indeed become blocked with the particulates in his exhaust 2-stroke smoke (though unnoticeable to the naked eye).
    Last edited by RedLineR; 2010/05/17 at 08:47 AM.
    SWAMBO
    2009 Suzuki Grand Vitara 3.2i V6 Auto
    Me
    2003 Ford Focus 2.0

    Eurard: For T=2; T=1 but, 1/2T=

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Walkerville
    Age
    44
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Do you use boat two stroke or normal two stroke oil.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Roodepoort
    Age
    67
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Try Prolong's AFMT. 350ML/75L diesel. Four times per year.
    Willie

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    36
    Posts
    9,413

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by berta View Post
    Do you use boat two stroke or normal two stroke oil.
    I use Quicksilver CTS Basic 2-cycle outboard oil with no ill effects. (I hope...)
    Range Rover Big Body 5.0 V8 Supercharged
    Land Rover Defender 110 CSW Puma
    Land Rover Defender 110 V8 Game viewer
    Land Rover Defender 100 PU V8
    Land Rover Freelander II SD4
    Jaguar XJS V12

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Onrus River
    Age
    72
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Interesting Topic,
    Major Performance Requirements for TWO STROKE ENGINE Lubricants are:
    Protection Aginst piston and cylinder scuffing.
    Protection against ring sticking and exhaust blocking.
    Smoke reduction
    Protection against rust and deposit-induced preignition.
    One can expect some change in the viscocity of the diesel and should be carefull that the PH balance of the diesel is not affected.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ballito
    Age
    31
    Posts
    698

    Default

    In terms of cokeing in the exhaust/cat it will be much less of an issue in a 4 stroke motor, I don't say it will be eradicated but the difference is that in 2 stroke motors(except those rare examples with direct injection) there is always a loss of UNBURNT air/fuel/oil mixture to the exhaust. This occurs whilst the piston is moving down and pressurising the crank case to feed the combustion chamber, and before the piston moves up sufficiently to block off the exhaust ports. This oil/fuel mix sits in the exhaust and creates a damp coke to which other soot (which, yes, is increased by 2stroke oil, but is none the less present in 4 stroke petrol and diesel exhaust gas anyway) sticks to. The thick sticky coke in a 2 stoke exhause isint a result of soot from combustion(which is relatively dry), its a result of unburnt fuel/oil mix caused by the inefficent reed or piston induction control, and its greatly reduced in 2 stroke motors with direct injection, although this makes a much heavier and more complicated motor which often defeates the object of using a 2 stroke in the first place.
    In the mixture ratios discussed here the fouling of spark plugs shouldnt be an issue, unless you are already operating at the limit of your spark plugs heat range.

    In the same breath im touchy about catalytic converters, be aware of the risks of putting it on your petrol motor.
    Last edited by Berty; 2010/05/17 at 11:48 AM. Reason: Typo
    1997 Cruiser 1HZ - New Toy
    2003 Lexus IS200 - Daily
    2006 Alfa Romeo GT 3.2 - Trouble Maker

  18. #58
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jorubundu Farm
    Age
    68
    Posts
    27

    Default

    the best product to use for diesel issues is one made especially for that purpose, so while two-stroke oil will help with lubricity issues diesel actually has a few more as well.. Wynns make a product called Wynns Diesel in an orange 375 ml bottle that treats 70 litres of fuel. The product does the following:
    #has an an anti-icing constituent that prevents diesel from waxing at sub-zero temperatures ( pertinent now as we go into winter)
    #contains biocide to kill algae that thrives in the diesel/water interface in all diesel tanks
    #removes any moisture that may accumulate in the fuel tank
    # cleans the injector tip deposits that form over time
    # contains a chemical constituent that allows carbon deposits accumulated on the cylinder head, pistons and turbo vanes to be cleanly burned off. This also reduces turbo lag that occurs as a result of carbon mass-accumulation on the vanes slowing down the spin-up when coming onto turbo.
    # contains a lubricity improver to combat low lubricity in fuel
    the last issue is particularly prevalent when buying fuel in some of our neighbouring states where paraffin is often used to dilute diesel to boost the profit margin. paraffin performs virtually identically to diesel when used, except that it has zero inherent lubricity which causes rapid wera of pumps and injectors. "Cutting" of diesel with paraffin happens regularly in South Africa too, in the past even by some big distributors because of the rewards involved. So it pays to be careful even in the cities
    Waxing of diesel is the phenomenon when the diesel begins to form crystals at lower temperatures and leads to filter blocking. Unless treated before the time with the prescribed product the only way to dewax it after suffering a filter block is to raise the temperature once again. This is difficult if you're stuck at some mountain resort for instance. Fuel companies supply "summer diesel" and "winter diesel" , changing from one to the other when the weather cools. However even the winter diesel is not able to withstand much below about minus 5 deg cel so if venturing to one of the colder areas the Wynns Diesel will take care of the problem.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Bloemfontein
    Age
    80
    Posts
    26

    Thumbs down Ron. Kalil 2 x Stroke Oil in Diesel --No.!!!

    Years of experience.(Sticking Injectors) First to add any product to diesel fuel will change Cetane Number(Flash Point) If not compatable could damage pistons (Holes) or seizures.
    All products that are compatable will not damage engines I.E. Wynns Injector cleaner petrol & diesel (Blue) in colour.I saved many injectors by adding double dosage (Once Only) to a tank of diesel or petrol for petrol injectors alike.Other brands shown as "Injector Cleaner" will not damage engines.
    In two stroke engines Stihl chain saws recommend only Stihl 2 stroke oil mixed to formula. Why.? Any other common brand will coke up exhaust ports.
    Commonly only use specified products. You will sleep better and save thousands.!!! Ron. Kalil
    Last edited by kalil; 2010/05/18 at 08:01 AM. Reason: Add words

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    42
    Posts
    12,235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kalil View Post
    Stihl chain saws recommend only Stihl 2 stroke oil mixed to formula. Why.?
    Because they want to sell their own two stroke oil!!!!!
    Everything is a hammer.
    Unless it is a screw driver.

    Then it it a chisel.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Advantage of a Diesel vehicle?
    By Krimpie in forum Mitsubishi
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 2014/12/26, 12:05 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2010/10/15, 04:36 PM
  3. Oil - diesel vs petrol
    By hcs in forum Vehicle & Technical Chat - General
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2008/09/12, 09:07 AM
  4. Prolong
    By henlo in forum Jeep
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 2007/06/06, 11:59 AM
  5. Good Oil ---- Bad Oil !!!!!!!!!
    By Landy Nut in forum Vehicle & Technical Chat - General
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 2007/02/12, 12:34 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •