Everything you must know about RADIOS !





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  1. #1
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    Default Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Info from this site:

    http://www.beadbreaker.co.za/radio_qa.htm

    ************************************************** ********************************

    What YOU SHOULD know about Radios, or AT LEAST,

    THIS IS WHAT i THINK YOU SHOULD KNOW

    OK what’s this about radios?
    To start of there are basically three means of radio communication used by the Overland fraternity.

    There are

    29 MHz radio,
    VHF radio for private use (Lets call this VHF-C (C for Commercial). Now just to confuse this issue somewhat, radios for private use are usually referred to as commercial radios, since no one understands that someone would want to buy a radio to talk to his buddies in other 4x4’s.
    VHF radio used by HAMs (Lets call this VHF-H (H for HAM)
    There are other radios that cover other frequencies that are available that can be used by HAMs, however, I am not going to go there, since I wish to concentrate on VHF as used commercially/privately and VHF as used by HAMs, since this is principally what this primer is about.

    Who and what is licensed?
    All and any communications equipment must be licensed. In the case of the first two “types” radios, mentioned above 29 MHz and VHF-C, the radio is licensed, in the case of the VHF-H the, the operator is licensed.

    Who is the licensing authority?
    In all case the licensing authority is ICASA (Independent Communications Authority of South Africa) See http://www.icasa.org.za

    What are the licensing requirements for a 29 MHz and a VHF radio?
    With a 29 MHz radio and a VHF-C used privately, the radios need to be licensed. You will have to apply for the radio license from ICASA and once you have received the license, you can pick up your radio. ICASA will require the name and model of the radio which must be a “Type Approved” radio.

    What is Type Approval?
    For a radio to be type approved, the radio dealer/importer will send his radio to ICASA who will test the radio for all sorts of things including amongst a host of other things, channel spacing, frequency drift, output power, etc.

    The radio will then be approved by ICASA for selling by dealers and it will be legal for dealers to sell these radios to the licensed public.

    What details do ICASA require from me when I apply for a radio license?
    You will need to provide ICASA with the channels that you are operating on. On a 29 MHz you will be allocated a maximum of three channels. On the VHF license, you will only be allowed to operate on one frequency, unless you have permission to operate on other frequencies. The use of second frequencies can only be obtained from the people to whom the channels have been allocated, in which case you will be required to pay for a license for the use of those frequencies as well.

    What are the legal requirements to sell/buy a radio?
    Dealers have in the past sold radios to people, without the required licenses, or people have sold their radios to other people who do not have licenses. This is illegal and you are required to sell a radio only to a person who has a valid license for that specific radio and for the frequency that, that radio will operate on.

    What frequencies can I operate on?
    When you apply for a VHF radio license you will be required to provide ICASA with your operating frequency.

    Is there a National 4x4 Frequency?
    Currently within the 4x4 community, there is only one legal national frequency, and that is the frequency that has been allocated to the Land Cruiser Club of South Africa.
    (Greg van der Reis also got a legal frequency for his club: http://www.4x4offroad.co.za/ )

    What do I have to do to be allowed to use the LCCSA frequency?
    You must be a member of the LCCSA who currently twice yearly will call for members who want purchase radios to forward their details to Egbert Le Roux, who will facilitate the radio licensing process. Radios must be type approved in order to be included with the Club License.

    What is the situation with the Off Road Radio Association?
    ORRA have an arrangement with ICASA to facilitate the licensing of 29 MHz radios for members of the 4wd club of South Africa. They currently administer the allocation of licenses for the Off Road frequency for 29 MHz radio communications. You can obtain a license for your 29 MHz via ORRA.

    Can I get a VHF license from ORRA?
    No! However, ORRA are currently in the process of looking into obtaining a national Off Road frequency, dedicated for the use of the off-road traveler, where after they will probably administer the licensing, as has ICASA up to now.

    Is there an annual license fee requirement?
    Yes you need to pay an annual fee for the licensing of radios in your possession. This varies, but is roughly R50,00 per radio. The Licensing Year is from 1 January to 31 December of the same year. If you do not pay your license, then an ICASA Inspector may call on you and seal your radio.

    END - Part 1
    "We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing"
    Oliver Wendall Holmes


    Johan (ZS1JV, M0ZJV)
    2015 JK CRD

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Part - 2

    QUESTIONS of a Technical Nature

    Why are the output watts important?

    Without getting technical, the higher the watts the further you can talk. However, besides output, the antenna, the terrain, atmospheric conditions and a host of other factors all play a role in determining the range of a radio.

    Can a VHF - C transmit over a along distance?
    Yes it can, provided there are repeaters and you have the right to use those repeaters. The maximum output of 25Watt however limits the maximum range.

    What are the outputs of a 29 MHZ and a VHF-C
    A 29 MHz is limited to 5watt output and a VHF-C radio to be used commercially/privately is limited to 25 watt output in commercial/private use. Handheld VHF-C radios are usually limited to 5 watt output.

    What is a VHF radio for commercial (private) use (VHF-C)?
    This type of radio is limited to 25 watt output power and should give you a far greater range, up to 30 km. It is also largely limited to line of sight communications. It is an FM radio and voice communications are far clearer than with a 29MHz radio.

    Since this is a primer and so as not to confuse any issues, the radios under discussion are VHF- FM (Frequency Modulated) since VHF can operate in other modes as well e.g. SSB (Single Side-band), CW (Carrier Wave) and AM (Amplitude Modification)

    In order to gain the maximum from these radios, a radio should be able to be programmed as Simplex or Duplex.

    What is Simplex?
    Simplex means that you talk and receive on the same channel / frequency. In other words you transmit on 149.375 and receive on 149.375.Thus if you are transmitting on 149.375, others are hearing on 149.375.

    What is Duplex?
    Duplex means that you talk on one channel/frequency and receive on another frequency. This primarily related to repeater operation. Thus if you are transmitting on 149.375, others are hearing on 149.975.

    What are repeaters?
    Repeaters are back to back radios set up on a high-site to enable line-of-sight communications. The repeater receives the communication on one frequency and immediately re-transmits the communication on a second frequency. The transmit frequency on VHF is by international convention -.600mkz lower than the receive frequency. In other words, you receive on 145.625 MHz and transmit on 145.025 MHz.

    Repeaters belong to someone and there for to access a repeater you need to either belong to that someone in terms of a club, or pay that someone in terms of a commercial venture.

    A repeater re-transmits your signal which is then picked up by all other radio stations on the frequency including any other repeaters within range. So your signal may then be re-transmitted along a line of repeaters operating on the same frequency and so could theoretically form a chain from Durban to Cape Town.

    Because the repeater it is on a high-site, it should reach someone in the valley below, and since it repeats your message, you can be on one side of the mountain whilst the other person can be on the other side of the mountain and that person can hear you perfectly. Without the repeater, you would not be able to reach the person on the other side.

    For 4x4 use, you will use simplex, since there is no repeater function available for any of the 4x4 channels. So only if you want your radio to perform dual functions do you need to ensure that the radio is “full duplex” as well as simplex when you buy it.

    There are normally no repeater networks set up for 29 MHz. So a 29 MHz radio can only perform the simplex operation.

    The Land Cruiser frequency has a Sub-tone. What are Sub-tones?
    Let’s say that you are in a convoy of 5 vehicles and in your immediate vicinity there is another convoy of 5 vehicles using the same frequency as what you are using. Both convoys are operating on the simplex mode. Everyone will be able to hear everyone who is on that frequency and there will be no privacy, between the two convoys

    You do not want to hear each other’s chit chat, so both convoys agree to introduce a sub-tone on their convoy’s radios. When you key the mike your radio first sends a sub-tone signal to all other radios in your group that “unlocks” opens the frequency on your convoy’s radios and your transmission is received by all the members in your convoy. At the same time because the other convoy does not have the same sub-tone as you have their radios will not be opened by your key and they will not hear your transmission. Similarly, because their sub-tone is different, your convoy’s radios will not be opened and you will not hear their conversation.

    Privacy between different groups on the same frequency is made possible by the use of CTCSS (Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System) sub-tones to effectively lock out un-authorized callers.

    The problem is that you are both transmitting on the same frequency. So you will not know when they are transmitting and you could talk over them. Radios therefore have a light that flickers or some indicator indicating that the channel is “busy”, being used by someone using a different sub-tone, but who is still using the same frequency as what you are. You will have to wait for the light/indicator to go out, before you can transmit your message.

    What is a VHF radio as used by Hams?
    This radio has far higher output than a VHF for commercial/private use and most of these radios can have their output power adjusted from 5W to 10W to 25W and up to 75 watt and higher.

    Is there any sense in becoming a HAM in as far as overland travel is concerned?
    Yes there certainly is.

    Using the other HAM frequencies for example those on HF, you will be able to talk over very long distances.
    Your transmission output is far higher than the 25watt output that is allowed for private VHF radios, and without getting technical, output generally equals range.
    The allocated frequency to a commercial/private user using type approved radios, is normally only valid for a limited area of operation. In certain cases it may be allocated for a small area such as the Cape Peninsula. In other cases it may be a national frequency. The LCCSA frequency is a national frequency.
    It is expected that ORRA will also apply for a national frequency. However, when crossing borders into neighboring territories, you will require a license to operate your radio in that country. It would therefore be possible that when crossing into Botswana with your LCCSA frequency or the envisaged ORRA frequency, you might find that, that specific frequency has been allocated to some other organisation in Botswana. You might therefore find that your application to use your radio in Botswana on a specific frequency is turned down. It s possible to program a new frequency into the radio but this can be a technical nightmare for the uninitiated.
    HAM frequencies are an international agreement and these frequencies will not be allocated to other private radio operators even in neighboring territories. You still however have to obtain a reciprocal license.
    If you have a cross-border HAM license, which should be easier to obtain, chances are good that you will also be able to reach HAMS in that country who could summons help in the event of an emergency.
    HAM’s are almost an international brotherhood and are usually friendly community minded persons, always willing to help and assist.
    What is a HAM?
    A HAM is a person who plays around with radios, for his pleasure. The interesting thing about a HAM, is that the HAM himself is licensed and not the radio. A ham may therefore have as many radios in his possession as he wishes to operate on those frequencies that are allocated to radio HAMs.

    Can a HAM operate on any VHF frequency?
    No! A HAM may only operate his HAM radio on the frequencies between 144Mhz and 146Mhz. There are however other frequencies that a HAM may use.

    Can a HAM operate on the Land Cruiser Frequency?
    No! If a HAM wishes to operate a radio outside of the allocated HAM frequencies, then the HAM must have a separate VHF radio and a license which allows him to use the other frequency. So a HAM can not use his HAM radio and legally talk on the Land Cruiser Frequency. A HAM may only talk to another HAM on the allocated HAM frequencies

    Will I be able to use the HAM bands for normal convoy travel?
    Yes, if you have an up to date HAM license. HAM radios generally have the ability to adjust their power output. Used on a lower output you will not be disturbing anyone in an area where you travel. You will be required to follow the correct radio procedure and there will be no difficulty in communicating whatever is required. HAMs through the various clubs also operate and maintain repeaters and you will be allowed to use these repeaters when you travel through certain areas. Information is available on the SARL website

    Can I operate my Radio in neighboring territories?
    Yes! However you will have to have applied for reciprocal radio licenses from the respective authorities in that country. This applies to both VHF and 29 MHz radios.

    The following information is provided by the Land Cruiser Club. http://www.landcruiserclub.co.za/

    This has been copied from their website. Below are the details if you wish to apply for a license to use a VHF radio, in SA or across the border:

    South Africa
    ICASA
    www.icasa.org.za
    info @ icasa.org.za
    Johannesburg
    Blocks A, B, C and D, Pinmill Farm
    164 Katherine Street
    Sandton
    Private Bag X10002
    Sandton
    2146
    Tel: 011 321 8200
    Fax: 011 444 1919

    Cape Town
    No 1 Neels Bothma Street
    N1 City
    Private Bag X17,
    N1 City
    Goodwood
    7463
    Tel: 021 595 1640
    Fax: 021 595 1793
    Namibia
    General Manager
    Namibian Communication Commission
    www.ncc.org.na (forms on website)
    56 Robert Mugabe Avenue
    Windhoek
    Private Bag 13309
    Windhoek
    Tel: 09264 22 2666
    Fax: 09264 22 2790
    Cost: R50 (valid 6 months

    Botswana
    BTA (Botswana Telecommunications Authority)
    Private Bag 00495
    Gaborone
    Tel: 09267 395 7755
    Fax: 09267 395 7976
    Cost: R110 (valid 6 months)
    Zambia
    Zambia Communication Authority
    Office of the Controller
    PO Box 36871
    Lusaka
    Tel: 092601 246 702
    Fax: 092601 246 701




    OK what radios ARE AVAILABLE AND how, when and where can I use them?

    What is a 29 MHz Radio?
    The 29 MHz radio is basically similar to the old CB (Citizen Band) radio which flooded the market in the 70’s and 80’s. The CB a 27 MHz radio, in normal use had limited range. Whilst the CB is still in operation, it does not find favor within the Overland community. The 29MHz is principally used by Ski Boat fisherman and in some cases for civil defense and area communications by farmers etc. It has a limited range due to it being limited to 5 watt output power. The maximum range is probably no further than 3-4km and is line of sight. It does not like to talk out of holes and will not talk over mountains and koppies, which can frustrate the user and limits its operation.

    29 MHz radios are commonly referred to as line-of-sight radios implying that the two antennas must have no obstacles between them such as buildings, and even trees.

    Commonly used 29 MHz radios in South Africa are the Navstar http://www.navstar.co.za/

    The Sceptre
    The Navstar

    These radios are also marketed under another brand name namely Dragon.

    Now, no matter what the salesman tells you, 29 MHz radios have a limited use within the overland community. There is a shift towards VHF which should be considered as the primary communications for the 4x4 Overland fraternity.

    Common radios used within the 4x 4 Overland community
    The following radios are commonly used by overlanders for VHF-C communications. In other words the owner has obtained a license for the radio with the specific frequency allocated on the license and is now able to use the radio to communicate with other radio owners on the same frequency.

    What radio should I buy?
    You should buy a VHF radio. It is FM, has a higher output and thus a better range than a 29 MHz radio.

    Commonly used VHF Radios for Commercial use


    ICOM IC-F111 for private VHF use.

    Download a brochure here. http://www.multisource.co.za/MS_New/...-F111_F211.pdf

    Kenwood TK-762G
    Motorola CM - 300

    What make of VHF should I buy
    There are three makes that are considered reliable and suitable for Overland purposes,

    Yaesu, ICOM and Kenwood. Select form amongst these and you will not make a mistake. From a backup point of view, ICOM seem to have the largest dealership through Multisource. http://www.multisource.co.za/

    What is a HAM VHF (VHF-H)?
    When you obtain your HAM license known as the HAREC (Harmonised Amateur Radio Exam Certificate) you are entitled to use greater power and also more frequencies. You will also be able to use for instance the HF frequencies which generally give greater range.

    VHF-H radios come in a variety of different packages. Hand-held’s are commonly 5 watt output whilst mobiles offer output up to 75 watt.

    A trio of comparable VHF radio transceivers for Ham’s in the VHF- FM bands
    ICOM IC-V8000
    Kenwood TK271
    YaesuFT-2800M

    A trio of comparable Multiband radio transceivers for Ham’s that are serious about their overland communications
    Serious users often require on radio that can transmit on a large range of frequencies. These radios are referred as Multiband radios since they can transmit and receive on a variety of frequencies such as VHF, HF, and UHF.

    How do I become a HAM?
    In order to become a HAM, you need to study, the study-material provided by SARL (South African Radio League), which can be downloaded free from their website. www.sarl.org.za

    Whilst the HAM course was relatively simple in the past, it has become more difficult due to the fact that South Africa has agreed to abide by the CEPT agreement. (CEPT = the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations) (See http://www.hamdirectory.info/Legge_CEPT-TR6101E.pdf) The CEPT agreement provides for reciprocal licensing of HAMS, when they visit other countries that are CEPT signatories.’

    Please note that you can no longer pass the ZR exam just by learning, what was known as the 600 questions. The following recommendation from the SARL to ICASA serves to illustrate this point. “The use of a publicly accessible question bank will be phased out. This is to prevent candidates from passing the exam by simply memorising the answers to all the questions in the question bank.”

    I am not technical what now?
    There are two different courses; the one being more technical, and the other containing less technical detail. The more technical course offers you a ZR license also known as a Class A-2 after which you can upgrade to a ZS license which is known as a Class A-1 license.

    The second is a ZU license or a Class - B License, which is less Technical and allows you access to the majority of HAM bands (Bands = Range of frequencies that you are allowed to use) but limits the maximum power that you are allowed to use. This is a recent change in the Regulations governing amateur radio, which for the one or other unknown reason has not been widely published.

    The SARL are progressively thinking that the non-technical person will enter the HAM fraternity through a ZU Class – B license and then through experiential learning and growing interest and understanding, graduate to the ZR and then ZS license.

    Full details on how to become a HAM are provided on the SARL website. You are well advised to attend classes that may be held in your area. The exams are written in May and October of each year.

    Which HAM Class should I go for?
    Of the 3 classes of Radio HAM who are recognized by the prefixes to their call signs

    Class A-1 = ZS is the highest qualification that you can attain, which gives you an unrestricted license.
    Class A-2 = ZR is the platform that gives you access to the ZS license for which you have to pass the Class - A examination.
    Class B = ZU is the platform that gives you access to the ZS license, for which you have to pass a Class – B examination. The curriculum for the Class - B RAE (Radio Amateurs Examination) is simplified and the electronics component is removed from the Class B RAE, which is the examination which must be passed to obtain a ZU license. This syllabus focuses on the knowledge required to operate a commercial transceiver safely, legally, correctly and without causing interference. Download the syllabus here http://www.harc.org.za/download_file...e_syllabus.pdf
    If you are not technically minded go for the ZU license. All persons who are serious about their overland traveling should at least do their ZU – Class – B license.

    What will it cost me?
    In order to become a Radio Amateur you will need to pass the Radio Amateur's Examination. The examination fee for the Radio Amateur's Examination is R450,00. This fee includes all costs levied by ICASA and the cost of conducting the examinations. The ZU license will cost you less; examination fee, including the ICASA license application and license fee will be R217.

    If you attend courses conducted by your local club then you may be required to pay a tuition fee to the club.

    Where do I obtain a cross-border HAM license?
    The SARL are able to assist with information on how to obtain reciprocal licenses for HAM members crossing borders please note that cross border licenses will only be available for the ZS and ZR licensed HAMs in terms of the CEPT agreement. Note that to obtain such a license can take up to 6 months, with 3 months being typical. These licenses are usually only valid for 6 months.

    Can I import a VHF radio from the States and use it here?
    Yes you can, provided it is a type approved radio in the case of a commercial/private radio.

    For the HAM bands you might find that you do not have access to certain frequencies on the VHF band plan, since each country use different VHF frequencies outside the HAM bands. Sometimes, this can be rectified, through the removal of certain diodes, which will immediately invalidate the guarantee on the radio. It makes more sense to buy locally, to buy legal and have the full backup of your local supplier.

    Where else can I get additional information about Amateur Radio
    American Radio Relay League: http://www.arrl.org
    Radio Society of Great Britain: http://www.rsgb.org.uk .

    If you have any questions that you wish to ask, please do so, by posting these questions to Guy Boardman at [email protected].

    I will try and answer those questions and where deemed necessary, add those questions and answers to this document.
    "We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing"
    Oliver Wendall Holmes


    Johan (ZS1JV, M0ZJV)
    2015 JK CRD

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    JDeV.

    Thanks, this looks very informative on a topic I know very little about.

    I am definately going to read this with interest.

    Just check your profile, it says you are a girl?

    Regards,

    Gerhard.


    2007 Nissan Patrol 4.8 Tiptronic GRX
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    Tyredog
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    JDeV,

    A great big thank you for this.

    Have been looking for this explanation for the last 6 months.
    John from Joburg<br><br>2001 Defender 110 with stuff

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Thanks JDeV, Info long overdue for the uninformed like myself.

    Wynvat,

    Do you check everyones profile to see if they are male or female ?
    Clive Kelfkens
    Heidelberg Gauteng
    2006 Jetta V
    2009 Citi Sport

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy


    Wynvat,

    Do you check everyones profile to see if they are male or female ?
    Muddy.

    Daai ou pienk tekentjie vang altyd my oog, 'n man is mos nie 'n klip nie!



    2007 Nissan Patrol 4.8 Tiptronic GRX
    TJM XGS 1" suspension
    TJM Snorkel
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    Tyredog
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Hi

    NEW 29/27 MHZ COMBO RADIOS LAUNCHED
    GME GX300 29Mhz Radio
    At last a new 29 MHz radio is available in South Africa. The 29 MHz band is
    used by offroad enthusiasts and ski boaters alike and the Australian company
    GME have introduced the GX300 into the South African market.
    http://www.grstrading.co.za/29meg.htm

    The GX300 is an innovative new design incorporating both 29 MHz
    Marine/Offroad Band and 27 MHz Citizen Band transceivers into one unit.
    (Only available if you hold both licenses) The GX300 is available in Black
    or white and allows the user to easily switch between Marine/Offroad and CB
    modes to suit the installation.

    With features such as Memory Channel Scan, Emergency/Priority Channel
    Recall, Dual Watch, Large Back-lit Display, very effective Noise Limiter and
    waterproof design (IP55) the GX300 covers virtually all aspects of 29 MHz
    communication on land or sea in one unit. The front mounted speaker provides
    loud clear reception and the channel controls on the microphone make
    operation easy. The GX300 is supplied with a gimbal mounting bracket, but
    with a depth of just 70mm, the GX300 is also perfectly suited to Flush
    Mounting (using the optional flush mount kit).

    Large back-lit LCD display with Lamp Dimming Function
    Rotary Squelch Control
    Programmable Memory Channel Scan
    Advanced Noise Limiter (NL) Circuitry
    User Selection of South African 29 MHz Channels
    Channel 88 and Priority channel selector key
    Dual Watch feature
    Water proof design (IP55) protects against water spray
    Available in Black or white in SA
    Remote Channel Change Function Microphone
    Multiple mounting options (flush or Gimbal mount)
    Provision for 10 Private Channels (GME Programmable Option Only)



    The suggested retail price for the GX300 is R1140 including VAT

    The license application fee is R210 per license (payable to ICASA)
    License fee is R48 per radio per year (R96)

    The radio price includes installation, antenna and VAT.

    The antenna come cometimes be tuned for both frequencies but in some cases
    you willl need a second whip for 27 Mhz (an additional R214).
    Deon Kotzee<br>Heidelberg<br>1999 Colt Rodeo 3.0 4x4 (Blue)

  8. #8
    Bartho Guest

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Is the picture deceiving or does it have a removable face ?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    I am keen to purchase some VHF radios and would appreciate any advice on the quickest / easiest route to follow to get a license for the radios. I've tried to call ICASA but that was an exercise in patience and unfortunately I failed miserably.

    Thanx,

    T-Bear
    G05 Terry

    Hilux 3.0 D-4D Double Cab 4x4 Raider

  10. #10
    Teppic Guest

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Quote Originally Posted by JDeV
    Quote Originally Posted by Wynvat
    Just check your profile, it says you are a girl?
    O my! Now my secret is out, hey guys - is it O.K with you , I mean ...... it is a man world around here
    Hmm - interesting. Does the little gender icon next to each post not get its value from the profile?

    I see JDeVs show the male arrow...

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !


    Hi Guys

    This was posted on the Overland site regarding VHF Licences:


    >
    > Mike, Chris and I attended the 4x4 Clubs open day yesturday. It was a very
    > informative day and included talks on the Burn Sheild product (Good news
    > Hennie you and Mike were both right on your comparisons), VHF radio's and
    > there was a demonstration by the rescue unit.
    >
    > Now for what I think is the big news for everybody, the VHF Licence.
    >
    > A frequency has been made available for the offroad community which you
    > will get on application and payment of your Licence. The licence costs
    R120
    > per year and there is a admin fee R10 and a joining fee of R20. You have
    to
    > be a member of any club affiliated to the AAWDC. (Landrover club, 4x4
    Club,
    > Toyota Lancruise club etc) And thats all there is to it.
    >
    > If you purchase a Licence now for the first time (not having any other
    > radio licence before) it will cost you R170 (R140 licence fee, R10 admin,
    > R20 joining fee) and will be valid until Dec 2007. You will then be
    > allocated a call sign and you will then be legal. You will also be able to
    > go and purchase a couple yellow stickes with numbers and letters on them,
    > matching your call sign, to stick on the back of your truck so others can
    > recognise you.
    >
    > BTW if anybody hears callsign Z108 on the air. Its me......so go easy on
    > me......
    >
    >
    > Regards
    > Bruce T
    > Z108
    Sander<br><br>'96 Range Rover 4.0 SE<br>Full OME kit & ARB Locker<br> Snyman 4x4 Custom Bumpers & Sliders<br>Hercules ATR 265/75/16<br>GME GX300 29MHz & FD-150A VHF Radio

  12. #12
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    Sep 2006
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    Posts
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Thanx Rangie.
    G05 Terry

    Hilux 3.0 D-4D Double Cab 4x4 Raider

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Age
    51
    Posts
    810

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Quote Originally Posted by Bartho
    Is the picture deceiving or does it have a removable face ?
    That is actually the complete radio, I looked at 1 awhile ago, nice and compact.
    "We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing"
    Oliver Wendall Holmes


    Johan (ZS1JV, M0ZJV)
    2015 JK CRD

  14. #14
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    Sep 2006
    Location
    Boksburg
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Correct me if im wrong but, that radio is a 27 and 29 mhz, correct ?
    Do you get something that combines all the ranges ?
    Clive Kelfkens
    Heidelberg Gauteng
    2006 Jetta V
    2009 Citi Sport

  15. #15
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    Sep 2006
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Age
    51
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    810

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy
    Correct me if im wrong but, that radio is a 27 and 29 mhz, correct ?
    Do you get something that combines all the ranges ?
    You are correct about that.
    If you want a radio that can do just about all frequencies, 27MHz, 29MHz, VHF, UHF, FM, AM - you can look at this one, together with the Yaesu ATAS-120 Active Tuning Antenna System - you will have a pretty nice rig

    YAESU - FT-857D


    http://www.yaesu.com/indexVS.cfm?cmd...5&isArchived=0

    Providing transmitter coverage of the HF, 50 MHz, 144 MHz, and 430 MHz Amateur bands, the FT-857 also includes receive coverage on 100 kHz to 56 MHz, 76 to 108 MHz, 118-164 MHz, and 420-470 MHz. Enjoy the excitement of public safety monitoring, along with weather broadcasts, AM and FM broadcasts, aviation communications, as well as the action on the Ham bands!
    The Yaesu ATAS-120 Active Tuning Antenna System provides HF/VHF/UHF coverage with automatic motorized tuning. It is the successor to the popular ATAS-100. Utilizing control signals from the transceivers microprocessor received via the coaxial cable, the ATAS-120's internal motor adjusts the radiator length for best SWR. The ATAS-120 covers the 7, 14, 21, 28, 50, 144 and 430 MHz amateur bands and is compatible with the FT-100, FT-847 and FT897.

    "We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing"
    Oliver Wendall Holmes


    Johan (ZS1JV, M0ZJV)
    2015 JK CRD

  16. #16
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    Sep 2006
    Location
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    Age
    41
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    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    And what would this little toy cost me. ?
    Clive Kelfkens
    Heidelberg Gauteng
    2006 Jetta V
    2009 Citi Sport

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Durbanville, CT
    Age
    52
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    133

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !


    On Ebay:

    YAESU FT-857D ALL MODE HF/VHF/UHF MOBILE TRANSCEIVER 14 Bids $561.99

    Yaesu FT-857D HF/VHF/UHF Mobile Radio 17 Bids $520.21

    Other places are more towards $750 plus postage plus SARS plus VAT plus waiting....
    Sander<br><br>'96 Range Rover 4.0 SE<br>Full OME kit & ARB Locker<br> Snyman 4x4 Custom Bumpers & Sliders<br>Hercules ATR 265/75/16<br>GME GX300 29MHz & FD-150A VHF Radio

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Age
    51
    Posts
    810

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy
    And what would this little toy cost me. ?
    The radio and fancy antenna is about R7700 then you still need a HAM (ZS) license - R450 and I suppose a license to use the 29MHz channels + license for the VHF 4x4 channel (or x2 if you want to use the Landcruiser Club frequency aswell)
    "We do not quit playing because we grow old, we grow old because we quit playing"
    Oliver Wendall Holmes


    Johan (ZS1JV, M0ZJV)
    2015 JK CRD

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Klerksdorp
    Age
    74
    Posts
    5,138

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Hi Johan,

    Excellent advice. One point that might require clarification is the FM frequency, as normally provided to a person or group of persons, is only applicable to a 50Km radius (maximum) of the area you applied for in the ICASA application forms, unless you apply to be registered with one of the "wide area" networks such as the LCCSA, subject to their approval, of course.

    The Kenwood TK7102 FM radio is a neat, compact 4-channel radio with front-firing speaker that is an exceptionally rugged unit. We have been using them underground in Mines and they do take the punch. This radio would replace the stated TK762G which is no longer available locally.

    The Motorola CM series are good buys as well, and are available in units offering 8 or 10-channel capability.

    Vertex (Yaesu) have just brought out a new radio, VX2100, which offers 8-channel capability and is very sturdily built. It has the advantage of using a rotary volume knob instead of the touch-buttons that feature in many other radios.

    It should also be borne in mind that 29MHz radios are fast becoming obsolete, especially with old technology types as used in the Dragon & Navstar ranges. While the Australian GME radio has recently become available, this radio is more expensive than the Navstar or Dragon radios, and one might consider an FM radio instead.

    Essentially, the type of radio you use will be determined by what the majority of users in your club or friendship ring, use.

    Motorola, Kenwood and Vertex have an extremely good country-wide Sales & Service representation, and you would not have any problems with any of these units as far as service is concerned.

    -Eric

    Eric Skeen is the Family Dog
    White Fang:
    1999 2700i DC Raider 4x4
    Bull Dog: 1987 4Y-EFI 2200 DC 4x4
    Pra Dog: 1998 Prado VX 3.4 V6
    Hound Dog: 2000 2700i SC 4x4

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Klerksdorp
    Age
    74
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    5,138

    Default Re: Everything you must know about RADIOS !

    Guys,

    Please remember that if you do import your own radio, it is ILLEGAL! ALL radios MUST have the gold ICASA sticker, both on the packaging as well as the actual unit, or otherwise the radio is illegal and you stand the chance that the local Distributors and Importers will not support it.

    A local distributor invests a considerable amount of money into aquiring ICASA type approval for the units that they legally import, as Authorised Distributors of that specific product. You can be quite sure that they are not going to be sympathetic to gray imports. They are supported by the original Parent Manufacturing company in this as well.

    Another danger is that although the radio might be of the same type, XYZ or whatever, as locally available, in many cases the programming software differs from country to country. In this case the local SA software will reject the radio as being of the incorrect type.

    Let the Buyer be aware...

    -Eric
    Eric Skeen is the Family Dog
    White Fang:
    1999 2700i DC Raider 4x4
    Bull Dog: 1987 4Y-EFI 2200 DC 4x4
    Pra Dog: 1998 Prado VX 3.4 V6
    Hound Dog: 2000 2700i SC 4x4

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