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  1. #61
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    I guess it depends on your needs and perspective. Product marketing has definitely had a big influence on the camping industry.
    I've built my setup over years of basic camping and still continue to improve it as I learn and get time for the project builds.
    For basic touring this is pretty much all that I need at the moment. A quick setup that is convenient to use also keeps Swambo happy...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    (LC 80 VX 1HD-FT TOURER)
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    ex (DEFENDER 130 300HP V8 "MR PUGLY")

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  3. #62
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    This thread is beginning to remind me of that old Monty Python bit about the poor Yorkshiremen

    Perhaps someone can soon brag how they used to rough it so much they didn't even have round wheels

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  5. #63
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Well, frankly speaking, I am always surprised of the loads many people take along, a duplicate household to their own.
    I also started with too heavy loads over Van Zyl´s Pass or up the South Zambesi escarpment. Over the years I reduced the loads to what is absolutely necessary.
    For the beginning I also bought a too large fridge. OK, now it is there. If I select such overlanding holidays, I do not need the comfort of my home. I also must be willing to eat a can of bully beef if there is no fresh meat reachable.
    What remained? Rooftent, bedding, fridge, 2 boxes foodstuffs (cans/ coffee etc), a roast for braai, a pot and a kettle, cutlery, dishes, cups, a small step, and two chairs. Plus a little clothing.
    And, I started to occasionally hire accommodation if I feel the desire for a real bed. That is fine for me as ex soldier, other people may feel they need more.
    Let them spend fortunes for a highly powered 4x4 and for an offroad caravan. Let them do it, everybody has got his own priorities. Even by taking their home servant along on holidays to wash the dishes and clean up, if they desire.
    I feel my car runs much better offroad when not loaded so heavy. And I feel better not taking hours to load or offload on a camping site or in the bush.
    Hajo

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  7. #64
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Khotso camp site Dec 2013

    we only have tent, 45 litre fridge ,2 ammo crates for food ,2 for utensils not even full ,2 for clothes ,chairs and bedding
    water 60 litres ,40 litres extra fuel and wood , we also have a small Sawyer water filter

    serves us well for up to 2 weeks
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  8. #65
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patroller View Post
    Back in the early nineties, a friend of mine's parents and their friends were, you could say, pioneers of Botswana overlanding.

    They had a Mazda Drifter bakkie, a Coleman, a map and a compass.
    The map was not the greatest.
    They got lost a few times
    The Trans Kalahari highway was a dirt road.
    and from day 3 onwards they lived on canned food

    But they made good memories....
    90's Pioneers you say? Not quite sure what my trip across the Kalahari in 1976 (Maun to Windhoek in a Series Landy) gets classified as then. Ancient history? :-)

    I am puzzled by the BIG FRIDGE trend. In many cases, the fridge takes up almost all the packing space. Then a trailer needs to be added, etc. etc.

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  10. #66
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Having done the camping / overlanding thing since 2000, I have a few basic needs to make the trip enjoyable and worthwhile. These needs can obviously be catered for by a range of tools, from the most expensive kit to the more basic tools, depending on your requirements and budget:


    • Sleeping dry / warm / comfortable mattress (can be ground tent, RTT, caravan bed, trailer top tent)
    • Cooler / fridge / freezer for the cold stuff for the duration of the trip (could be a cool box with dry ice or compressor fridge, latter will require a DB system)
    • Hot shower - weather dependent (can range from a shower bag hanging in a tree to a hot water geyser system)
    • Protection against the sun and rain (could be a normal basic pull-out awning, gazebo to a fully-fledged electrical awning, full tent with all the sides, etc.)
    • Decent coffee (can range from instant Enrista to a proper coffee machine, depending on what you regard as decent coffee)
    • Something reliable to prepare a meal in, again it can range from the most expensive pots to a basic dutch oven and skillet
    • A system to charge the basics, e.g. camera batteries, cell phones, TPMS, etc.

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  12. #67
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by iandvl View Post
    Alex,

    But were they comfortable ?

    Back then you did not know what you were missing.

    And I guess it depends also on how much you are prepared to spend on comfort.

    But if everyone else around you has all the bells and whistles, it would be difficult to justify doing it completely 'simple / stupid' today.

    For some it is status, for some it is about keeping the madam of the campsite happy.

    Each to his own.

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  14. #68
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Beer, wood, meat, a coolerbox with frozen cotton balls is all you need.😁 Ok..maybe a few clean pairs of undies, bar of soap and a Mozzy muti. Depends on your quest for the weekend, do you want to impress folks or simply wind down. I recently fasted for 14 days...that puts things in a different perspective all together😉
    Last edited by moetbiedjiewegkom; 2024/02/26 at 06:03 PM.
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  15. #69
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by CanAmSteve View Post
    90's Pioneers you say? Not quite sure what my trip across the Kalahari in 1976 (Maun to Windhoek in a Series Landy) gets classified as then. Ancient history? :-)

    I am puzzled by the BIG FRIDGE trend. In many cases, the fridge takes up almost all the packing space. Then a trailer needs to be added, etc. etc.

    Was that not the Laurens van der Post trip?

    Yes that is ancient history, and must have been quite something.

    But before 1990, Botswana was not easy to get to for Saffas, unless you were in the Reccies I think....

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  17. #70
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patroller View Post
    Was that not the Laurens van der Post trip?

    Yes that is ancient history, and must have been quite something.

    But before 1990, Botswana was not easy to get to for Saffas, unless you were in the Reccies I think....
    My dad and a friend did a trip to Gorongosa and Hwange (then Wanke), ending the weekend before the massacre that kicked off the civil war in Rhodesia, so 1964.
    They did it in a normal 2WD station wagon.

    The friend had also done a few trips to the Delta. Had a buddy there who was a crock hunter. Things were different back then.
    Last edited by Peter Connan; 2024/02/26 at 07:53 PM.
    Beat-up rat rod of a '96 Nissan Patrol that bears the evidence of many wonderful adventures (and a few stupid indiscretions).

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  19. #71
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patroller View Post

    But before 1990, Botswana was not easy to get to for Saffas, unless you were in the Reccies I think....
    Botswana has always been wide open for South Africans. Even when the apartheid regime went in and killed people in Gaborone, and sent letter bombs to exiles.
    Last edited by Tony Weaver; 2024/02/26 at 09:17 PM.
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  21. #72
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Growing up, we spent a lot of time visiting family in Botswana. Mahalapye was our base, and we then we would either go to the farm in the Tuli Block or the cattle post out in the Kalahari. Being a Scout, we were used to living out of a hiking bag for a week or two. Now the body is too buggered to for roughing it, so we travel with our Xplorer van. Towing the van means there are some destinations that we won't be able to do with this setup. Our way of doing things is to set up a base camp in an area and spend a few days exploring that area before moving on to the next area.
    This setup and way of doing things may not be what others like to do, but it works for us. I think it's important to do what works for you and not be pressured to just follow the crowd.
    The humble person makes room for progress; the arrogant person believes they’re already there.
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  22. #73
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    I mean all this depends on your needs, and also how much you're willing to spend, doesnt it?
    Camping/Overlanding used to be a way to have an awesome holiday on the cheap (vs staying in a resort, etc), but with some of the setups these days, it would take MANY camping holidays to end up being more cost effective than staying at a resort. So I suppose it really is all about the experience.

    I'm very happy with our families small/budget setup. 1 large Tentco tent, large gazebo with side panels, ground sheets. Table, chairs, stretchers with mattresses, a fridge if we need, some other odds and ends. Done.
    However this falls apart if we ever do a LONG trip with multiple stops, setting all this up every time would be a nightmare. But we cant do a Rooftop tent, as we have young kids and we'd all sleep in the same tent. Also I prefer a "home base" so that the vehicle is freed up for game drives. This all works fantastically for me as we seldom camp for more than 2-3 nights.

    My folks, however, who are avid overlanders (month+ in Bots, Namibia, etc regularly) make great use of their conqueror trailer. They have it always ready to go sans perishables, fully kitted out with whatever luxuries they need. For them it makes complete sense. Easy to pack-up-and-go for each place they set up camp, and all the creature comforts to make their trips more enjoyable.
    K.a.k Wheeler

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  23. #74
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    We started off with sleeping in the back of a bakkie.

    Then we upgraded to a small tent, named Lighty, with a double bed mattress cut half, to accommodate our family of 4. Later we "upgraded" to air mattress, which are just there to use for not sleeping on the ground, at first.

    Again upgraded to a bigger tent, named George, to accommodate stretchers, 8 of them, when that one day we wanted to sleep outside but was attacked by squadrons upon squadrons of mosquitoes at Verneukpan.

    Just 'mooi dik' for packing all the paraphernalia that goes with tenting, we upgraded to a rooftop tent. A whole lot less of stuff to pack with a RTT. But after a couple of tours we were hampered by said RTT. Twice we heard a huge tiff between hyena and lion, once at Mogotho and another at Mosemane Pan. No ways we can pack up and go to see the commotion, while our fellow campers sped off. That was it and it was sold.

    We looked far and wide to get a tent that would satisfy our requests. One was that you must be able to close the windows from the inside, don't want to run in the rain outside while hyena and lion was lurking about. We eventually got one. Easy to set up, but it was, and still is a very heavy tent, but solid.

    We always said that we will never own a trailer as you always would have to worry about the damn thing with extra wheels. Yea right! We bought a trailer to see if it will gel with our way of operation. What an eye opener! 80 000km later we sold our beloved Metalian. It was just that too many times we had to pack up the trailer tent drenched in rain.

    Presently we tow an off-road caravan. Not new, but we love it as it has nice big windows to 3 sides of the caravan. Our last long tour was via Mabua, CKGR, Moremi, Savuti and back home. Yes, we had to fix it when we were back but it is stronger now.

    Must say, we took Mr Heavy when we traveled down the Orange River as some of the roads we use, is definitely not even trailer friendly.
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  25. #75
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    We are very simple campers. Too lazy to do all the packing and cleaning, but our last trip was definitely the worst. We/I forgot to pack the table in. It was hell having to remove all the crap off the fridge each time I wanted a beer. Luckily the Landy has two flat top fenders. Came in very handy.

  26. #76
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Overlanding has become moving your home comforts into the bush. Africa is a harsh continent and to REALLY feel it you need to take it on with the gloves off. To see a 4x4 rig festooned with spotlessly clean, new paraphernalia of every description does make me chuckle. give me my old battered black kettle and my mud splattered and scratched 4x4 that tells me that I have REALLY been in Africa.

  27. #77
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by GH View Post
    Are we not in a fashion of over complicating overlanding and camping for ourselves?

    When I did my first trip, I had a single Engel fridge, a roof rack with a rooftop tent, camping chairs a galvanized bucket with a little 12 volt shower and some lamps. Nice and simple back then.

    Now, it's huge caravans, up to three fridges with a huge power system and putting out solar panels at each stop. Very overloaded vehciles with camper conversions, stoves, ovens, fancy coffee makers, showers, and everything one can possible fit in. Part of travelling now is stressing about all the kit working correctly. Unpacking and packing up at each stop consists of a lot of items.

    Or does the new way actually make overlanding less stessful and easier?


    why do people travel this way because of "content creators" or "influencers"...
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  28. #78
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by GH View Post
    Are we not in a fashion of over complicating overlanding and camping for ourselves?....................?
    Around 25 years ago I sold a totally original low mileage 968 VW Beetle, Marie Biscuit tyres and all, to a Dutchman who worked here in Cape Town and was on his way home after his contract ended. He packed his luggage, sleeping bag and one-man tent, a box or two of food, and he drove it all the way through Africa, and with a few twists and turns along the way, via the Middle East and Europe, back to the Netherlands. He did not even service it beforehand because I said it was in perfect running condition and I had serviced it myself shortly before. Paid me with a wad of cash.

    Every time I over-plan, over-pack, over-cater or over-think, I am remided of how very stupid I was to sell that car.......should have kept it for ever!

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  30. #79
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by jaysonvans View Post
    why do people travel this way because of "content creators" or "influencers"...
    Surely this only applies to those doing their first trip or two and not what seems to be the majority of posters here, who started with basic setups and have continuously upgraded?
    After that, they have enough experience to know what they like?

    The pity is if it prevents people from trying it because they feel they can't afford it. But I feel there are probably enough dissenting voices that people who are really interested will at least notice that there are alternatives?
    Beat-up rat rod of a '96 Nissan Patrol that bears the evidence of many wonderful adventures (and a few stupid indiscretions).

  31. #80
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    Default Re: Complicated overlanding.

    Quote Originally Posted by DJR View Post
    Around 25 years ago I sold a totally original low mileage 968 VW Beetle, Marie Biscuit tyres and all, to a Dutchman who worked here in Cape Town and was on his way home after his contract ended. He packed his luggage, sleeping bag and one-man tent, a box or two of food, and he drove it all the way through Africa, and with a few twists and turns along the way, via the Middle East and Europe, back to the Netherlands. He did not even service it beforehand because I said it was in perfect running condition and I had serviced it myself shortly before. Paid me with a wad of cash.

    Every time I over-plan, over-pack, over-cater or over-think, I am remided of how very stupid I was to sell that car.......should have kept it for ever!
    Good friends of ours did JHB to CT via Lesotho in a Land Rover Series 88 (shorty) with an infant in the 70s. No fridge. We drove Maun to Windhoek in a LWB Series LR in 1976 - two guys and two women. No fridge, not even a cool box. Beer, biltong and a pup tent :-)

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