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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Get youself a cheapish Garmin, load T4A and off you go. No need for a fancy and expensive unit. Up till now I've used a Nuvi 1410, but got a 2nd hand Drivesmart 65 now for R1k just for the beter resolution and displaying more on the screen.
    You read my mind!
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  3. #22
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Veneficus View Post
    I have Garmin Drive assist 51 LMT-S
    Works great and advantage is that it has Dashcam built in as well with warning if it pics something up
    And it also has ability to link to rear view and side cameras and record from that as well up to 4 extra cams
    That on top of its standard GPS functionality and traffic system (Plus Bluetooth phone connections and abilities)

    New model is Drivecam 76

    As for the Mapping google maps is still bit better for traffic since it has allot more people using it when you are in the city
    But these works great going anywhere

    Plus other than most smart devices they are also made to handle working environmental temperatures up to 60c
    Where most smart devices are designed up to be ok up to about 40c
    Thank you that sounds like a great option.

    @Christoff - my experience as well. I am also an impulse explorer; I see a side road or track and go; "Let's go check that out". Phones don't always have the capability to help, but maybe I should sharpen up my skills if the phone gps can then still work. I prefer to have a separate piece of equipment though, so not everything on my phone.
    2009 VW Touareg 3l V6 TDi
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  5. #23
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by KobusDJ View Post
    I can not comment on Apple.

    For Android there are many options. Mapping Apps with PreLoaded Maps. No Cell Reception or Internet necessary.

    They all use Openstreetmap data. Maps.Me, HereWeGo, OsmAnd, Sygic ....

    Image below was in Khutse Game Reserve. Android with OsmAnd had the same data as the T4A on the Montana.



    .
    This is the crucial post in this thread.
    Last edited by 4ePajero; 2023/06/08 at 03:27 PM.
    God gave us reason, not religion
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  7. #24
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    .
    Last edited by George; 2023/06/08 at 03:37 PM.
    Disclaimer - All my posts on this forum is without prejudice, is based on my fair assumptions or perceptions, might not be factually correct, is in no way intended to cause harm to anyone and is acted upon at your own discretion.

  8. #25
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Windsock View Post
    Apparently this feature will only be available for Apple when IOS 17 is released later this year?

    "Rerouting" is the last thing you want Siri to tell you when you're lost in a no-signal zone on the road. Fortunately, with the iOS 17 update, you'll soon be able to use your iPhone's Maps app offline, Apple announced at its WWDC event Monday. This long-awaited feature has been available on Google Maps for years and will finally be available for iPhone users later this year.
    Don't confuse GPS reception with satellite data service. All modern cell phones have GPS receivers. If you have the maps on your phone it can use the GPS signal to plot your position on the map. Functionality like route planning is done by the app. Google Maps on your phone's default is to download the maps through the cellular network and (I think) it also does some navigation in the cloud. It obviously also downloads traffic data etc. That is why it is so good in an urban environment. They do allow you to pre-download maps to save on mobile data use while you are on the road. It can therefore still navigate where you have no phone reception, because it still gets the immediate location data from the satellites.

    The important thing about conventional GPS navigation is that the location data is transferred, or actually broadcasted, in one direction only - from the satellites down to earth.

    Apple announced recently that the new iPhone 14 will have the functionality to also send data via satellites. This is because of new hardware that will be included in the phones. The main aim of the service is for emergency/SOS signals only, because transferring data via satellite is extremely expensive. This functionality will be similar to Garmin's Inreach. (Yes, I think Garmin should be scared of this.) This functionality will therefore have no influence on GPS navigation.
    Tyrannosaurus R5 (sold) and now on my second second hand D4 British Tata.

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  10. #26
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by DC Polokwane View Post
    The below is from their website.

    This is an information and location orientation app. This is not a navigational app. This app does not perform route guidance like the GPS but it is very good at providing you with a good map at various zoom levels and you will be able to discover places of interest around you much easier than with a GPS. The GPS is better at searching for known places as opposed to discovering what is around you. The two compliment each other.
    I actually have the navigational map loaded on my tablet and it is a route guidance app, from Christoff's post it would appear that they have discontinued with this product. This is a huge pity as I found this preferrable to the Garmin based system because you can save on the extra device purchase but more importantly it's advantage over a Garmin based application lay in the fact that you could plan a route on the T4A app and save it on the device no need for Basecamp. Here's screen shot of my next trip you can obviously zoom in for more detail if you wish.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot_20230608-155202_Navigation.jpg 
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ID:	690493  

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  12. #27
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by JanB View Post
    Don't confuse GPS reception with satellite data service. All modern cell phones have GPS receivers. If you have the maps on your phone it can use the GPS signal to plot your position on the map. Functionality like route planning is done by the app. Google Maps on your phone's default is to download the maps through the cellular network and (I think) it also does some navigation in the cloud. It obviously also downloads traffic data etc. That is why it is so good in an urban environment. They do allow you to pre-download maps to save on mobile data use while you are on the road. It can therefore still navigate where you have no phone reception, because it still gets the immediate location data from the satellites.

    The important thing about conventional GPS navigation is that the location data is transferred, or actually broadcasted, in one direction only - from the satellites down to earth.

    Apple announced recently that the new iPhone 14 will have the functionality to also send data via satellites. This is because of new hardware that will be included in the phones. The main aim of the service is for emergency/SOS signals only, because transferring data via satellite is extremely expensive. This functionality will be similar to Garmin's Inreach. (Yes, I think Garmin should be scared of this.) This functionality will therefore have no influence on GPS navigation.
    The current LMT-S Garmin's gets their traffic info and so using your Cell
    And use that with their GPS info to update location info

    I do feel Garmin needs to fix some of the default SA maps
    lists road closed where they are open and some open where recently closed
    2007 Subaru Forester 2.5XT
    Forester nutter here so watch out

    Please remember that I think I'm funny
    (most people don't agree)
    thus take 90% of what I post with 2 pinches of salt

  13. #28
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Christoff View Post
    I've tried the likes of Google, maps.me etc. in offline mode. None of those can replace a Garmin with T4A in remote areas currently.

    I still have the old T4A navigation app on my phone (not the guide app), that works great but was discontinued so the maps are now out of date sadly.

    To the OP, I use a Garmin Drive 52 (R1500). That works perfectly fine with T4A (R2250 for 5y)
    Christoff have you tried this link posted by someone above in this thread?
    https://tracks4africa.co.za/maps/about/smartphone

    I am wondering if this T4A app will work with my new (and unknown brand to me) tablet?
    Blackview Tab12.
    It runs on Android ver. 11, 4 Gig RAM, 8 core processor 64GB ROM and seems to be quite "fast"
    Takes two SIM cards, one MTN and one Vodacom and can link to my Windows PC and Sync between the two devices.

    If so, I am wondering if there is some kind of mounting that I could use to hold it in view while driving? (out of direct sunlight so that I can READ the screen)
    Peter Hutchison
    Answering the call of the wild is just so much better than answering the mobile.
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  14. #29
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter1949 View Post

    If so, I am wondering if there is some kind of mounting that I could use to hold it in view while driving? (out of direct sunlight so that I can READ the screen)
    Peter
    Something like this may suit you, fixes on seat rails

    https://www.rammount.co.za/catalogue...am-b-316-1-un9

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  16. #30
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by walkabout View Post
    Hi guys, I am clueless when it comes to GPS devices, normally just use paper maps, or Google maps on phone where reception.

    My question, is there a difference in RECEPTION/SIGNAL capability between cheaper Garmin devices (e.g. Nuvi something) as compared to the more expensive ones (e.g. Overlander)? As in the heading, I am talking really remote areas, i.e. where there is no cellphone signal or reception.

    I take it the Overlander etc. will have nicer features making it better for overland trips and so on, but if one just wants to install T4A on a device to see the roads and possible routes around you or where you are, is there any diffs?

    I am only considering Garmin as we have a good Garmin distribution centre here.

    Thanks.
    TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION - IS THERE A DIFFERENCE ?
    I assume you're really asking if a more expensive unit could determine your position more accurately.
    Yes, it probably could. Is the difference going to change your life ? I think not.

    There are many features that determine the price of the device (Chipset, Screen size, Processor, GNSS, WAAS etc).
    A GNSS enable device can use Glonass (Russian), Galileo (European), Beidou (Chinese) satellites whereas a GPS only device can only use GPS (US) satellites. The logic being the more satellites the more accurate your determined position will be.

    GPS (US) are constantly upgrading the system (launching new satellites to replace damaged and outdated satellites).
    One of the upgrades (think they're about 60% complete) is the L5 system. L1 = Open Channel, L2 - US military.
    My understanding is that future chipsets will be able to use L1 + L5 or L2 + L5 to improve the determined position and its reliability.

    All devices can determine your position so a better question is - What device should you get \ use?

    If you ask 10 people you'll get 20 different answers - It really boils down to the features you'll need & use and your preferences. Ask a few of your friends to demonstrate their receiver and consider the following:
    - Primary Application (Hiking, Boating, Vehicle etc)
    - Map set (T4a, osm etc)
    - Features (Screen size, Mounting options, Speed, Track support (view multiple tracks on the unit) etc)
    - Planning & transfer of Routes & Tracks to the device
    - Price

    The newer Garmin units (vehicle orientated) tend to be Android based. These have fantastic high resolution screens & are really responsive but transferring data (Maps, Routes, Tracks & Waypoints) is not a simple copy & paste as with the older units. Using an Apple computer with the new units is another \ impossible issue. To overcome these device communication issues, Garmin has created a number of phone apps to link to the device. These apps have introduced some great features, solved a few of issues but also created a few other problems.

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  18. #31
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by walkabout View Post
    Thank you, if the difference is the antenna does it then not follow that those devices will have better reception? (I know nooothing, like "Manuel from Spain")
    Be careful.......Manuel's relatives live here in SA.....
    There is no task too simple for some people to complicate !



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  20. #32
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by eagle eye View Post
    Stay away from Overlander
    Why is this?

  21. #33
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by FDW View Post
    Why is this?
    I'm guessing this has to do with loading routes and waypoints from your PC to the device, a bit of a schlep but once I got the hang of it does not bother me so much any more, takes more time but it works in the end. Would like to know what other issues he's had.

    I upgraded my Montana 680 to the Overlander, have done a few long trips with it and it performed flawlessly! The bigger screen is a huge positive for me, I even run my TPMS off the Overlander, it also connects to the inReach for comms with those back home and for emergencies. Wouldn't trade my Overlander for anything else.
    NJ Vermaak

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  23. #34
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by eagle eye View Post
    Stay away from Overlander
    May I ask why?
    Chad Robinson - Durban KZN
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  24. #35
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    Quote Originally Posted by ChadRobin View Post
    May I ask why?
    Me too, used it for a while now.
    Johan Kriel

  25. #36
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    Default Re: Garmin for remote areas

    I am a bit like Peter, but having learned my navigation before GPS was invented, I am comfortble with hard maps (charts). I used any GPS function that can give me coordinates. Then I transfer them to the map with a scale rule and divider to know exactly where I am. It makes me real comfotable to know that I am not in the hands of software that may need a reboot.

    A few years ago I found myself rushing through Mauritania in a Land cruiser at night. We were trying to get to Dakar by 5am to catch a plane to Joeys. I kept looking up at the stars and was convinced that we were tracking too far east. Completely by chance, I saw that a companion had a Nokia Navigator phone-a sort of slide out thingey. I grabbed it and located its nav function. There we were, traveling in the wrong direction! It took a bit of doing to convince the driver ( a local) to track 180 degrees but we made it. So my phone and map book come with me everywhere.

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