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  1. #1
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    Default This Pistonless, 25,000rpm-Capable Engine Shows Combustion Could Have A Future





    "... Invented by Matthew Riley, it’s a rotary engine, but it operates very differently from a Wankel. For one thing, there are no apex seals. Or many seals at all for that matter.

    The design splits the four-stroke combustion cycle in two. On one half of the engine, we have two ‘paddle rotors’ dealing with intake and compression, and another pair on the other side for combustion and exhaust. Two counter-rotating shafts run through the engine and these rotors, each synchronised by big gears.

    These cogs and their bearings are the only contact points in the whole engine, thus the only bits that require lubrication. Very tight tolerances are key for the lack of rotor seals, as are the high RPMs involve since there is “not enough time for the air to leak when running,” Astron says.

    This Pistonless, 25,000rpm-Capable Engine Shows Combustion Could Have A Future - News
    There’s also a supercharged air intake running at extremely high pressure, which is said to be “an integral part of the combustion process”. Compared to a regular supercharger that might run at something like 15psi on a production car, the Omega 1’s forces air in at more like 200 to 300 psi.

    Another interesting element is the “skip fire” function. While you’re accelerating, the engine will fire during every rotation, but at cruising speed, it’ll only combust when necessary - “every five, 10, 50 rotations or whatever is required”. As a result of this and the generally efficient nature of the engine, the Omega 1 is said to offer “extremely low” emissions.

    And now for the really fun bit. Much like a Wankel engine, the Omega system is modular, so you can theoretically line up however many units you want. A two-engine stack for instance would weigh around 150kg and produce over 300bhp and 340lb ft of torque while getting through very little fuel. Oh, and it’ll rev up to 25,000rpm. Suggested applications include generators, marine, aerospace and yes, recreational vehicles...."

    https://www.carthrottle.com/post/thi...have-a-future/
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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: This Pistonless, 25,000rpm-Capable Engine Shows Combustion Could Have A Future

    Quote Originally Posted by Orxy View Post




    "... Invented by Matthew Riley, it’s a rotary engine, but it operates very differently from a Wankel. For one thing, there are no apex seals. Or many seals at all for that matter.

    The design splits the four-stroke combustion cycle in two. On one half of the engine, we have two ‘paddle rotors’ dealing with intake and compression, and another pair on the other side for combustion and exhaust. Two counter-rotating shafts run through the engine and these rotors, each synchronised by big gears.

    These cogs and their bearings are the only contact points in the whole engine, thus the only bits that require lubrication. Very tight tolerances are key for the lack of rotor seals, as are the high RPMs involve since there is “not enough time for the air to leak when running,” Astron says.

    This Pistonless, 25,000rpm-Capable Engine Shows Combustion Could Have A Future - News
    There’s also a supercharged air intake running at extremely high pressure, which is said to be “an integral part of the combustion process”. Compared to a regular supercharger that might run at something like 15psi on a production car, the Omega 1’s forces air in at more like 200 to 300 psi.

    Another interesting element is the “skip fire” function. While you’re accelerating, the engine will fire during every rotation, but at cruising speed, it’ll only combust when necessary - “every five, 10, 50 rotations or whatever is required”. As a result of this and the generally efficient nature of the engine, the Omega 1 is said to offer “extremely low” emissions.

    And now for the really fun bit. Much like a Wankel engine, the Omega system is modular, so you can theoretically line up however many units you want. A two-engine stack for instance would weigh around 150kg and produce over 300bhp and 340lb ft of torque while getting through very little fuel. Oh, and it’ll rev up to 25,000rpm. Suggested applications include generators, marine, aerospace and yes, recreational vehicles...."

    https://www.carthrottle.com/post/thi...have-a-future/
    already been discussed. Interesting idea but their efficiency claims are simply pie in the sky fantasy.
    Anton Muller

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