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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Johannesburg
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    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Commander View Post
    https://youtu.be/nBUosyrb960

    This video does a pretty good job of explaining how it works, you can also see the mounting of the bar to the axle has some distance from the centre line. You will find this more exaggerated on most installations.

    The key is also that it is a driven axle...

    I am not saying remove it from your trailer, I am just saying I doubt it is doing much good there.
    Thanks Commander. Now that I know what it is I'll keep researching some more. The concept makes sense to me for a driven axle, but not so much for a trailer axle. I'll probably just leave it, but at least I now know what it is and that it's not going to send any parts flying when I unbolt the shocks to replace.

    Thanks all for the input

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
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    37
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    3,173
    Thanked: 800

    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois Theron View Post
    As mentioned above somewhere, a leaf spring setup by design also acts as the trailing arm/torque rod on an axle. A coils sprung setup has no way of locating the axle in a way to prevent sideways and/ or lateral movement, therefore trailing arms/ torque rods are implemented to locate the axle.

    Thus having leaf springs together with trailing arms make very little sense, especially on a non driven axle. On some high performance or high torque DRIVEN axles on leaf springs, a type of torque rod is sometimes used to prevent axle wrap under high torque applications. On a non driven trailer axle clearly there is no such action.

    In the photo above, the leaves are fixed at on point and free on the other point, leaving the axle to actually move slightly forwards and backwards during suspension movement as the leaves deform. With the torque rod it can only move up and down in a slightly circular motion. I guess in its current design I think movement is restricted.
    One end of the leave is always able to move, usually on a shackle or on light duty applications it simply slides on the chassis with a pin to limit down travel. So I agree that limiting the spring movement with a control arm or similar may be detrimental.


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  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pretoria
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    64
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    Thanked: 1170

    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    The use of that rod on a trailer leaf spring is what is called a "second year engineering students wet dream".
    Mike Nieuwoudt
    '89 LR 110 V8

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  6. #24
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Ruimsig
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    57
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    6,979
    Thanked: 30058

    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    Gents, dont shoot the messanger. The question was asked and I answered.
    Estee = S T = Sean Towlson

    Hummer H3 V8

    #itsnotaboutME

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Barberton
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    64
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    6,589
    Thanked: 3313

    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Commander View Post
    Isn't the Fortuner coil sprung?
    Yip. Torque rod prevents the axle from twisting.
    https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink/top...ink_source=app

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Somerset West
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    62
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    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    Some years back there were a few hairy pics of trailers that had lost their axles, so much so that it scared me into fitting retaining cables that had like 1cm slack. I saw these "traction rods" fitted to another local brand and also saw that during leafspring compression, that the lengths of the two arcs would be different. With leafsprings with a low camber, this is marginal and the poly bushes should accomodate for this. I subsequently went for a spring with military wrap and fitted a retaining bolt behind the leafspring eye in the event that the front bolt failed for whatever reason - then the retaining bolt would keep the eye in the "socket" of our bracket. I think this was done for the same reason rather than for axle trap, because trailer springs are substantially shorter and getting axle trap during braking is unlikely.

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  10. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Johannesburg
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    63
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    5,723
    Thanked: 3178

    Default Re: Suspension component Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz Modricky View Post
    Some years back there were a few hairy pics of trailers that had lost their axles, so much so that it scared me into fitting retaining cables that had like 1cm slack. I saw these "traction rods" fitted to another local brand and also saw that during leafspring compression, that the lengths of the two arcs would be different. With leafsprings with a low camber, this is marginal and the poly bushes should accomodate for this. I subsequently went for a spring with military wrap and fitted a retaining bolt behind the leafspring eye in the event that the front bolt failed for whatever reason - then the retaining bolt would keep the eye in the "socket" of our bracket. I think this was done for the same reason rather than for axle trap, because trailer springs are substantially shorter and getting axle trap during braking is unlikely.
    It was Metalians that had their front sprin bolts snapped right in the middle, the bolts fitted was the wrong bolts being fully threaded instead of only the part protruding from the spring mounting. This resulted in a 12 x 1,25 fully threaded bolt but with an effective shaft of only 9.5mm snapping in the middle of the spring mounting due to shock loads concentrating or meeting in the middle, still have the photos, mostly it was trailers that went off road that was affected. A refit of 16mm mounting bolts and the cables was the immediate solution eventually the cables were replace by the second bolt.

    There will always be some force on a braked or powered axle and it depends on the weight of the trailer / vehicle how much warping there is going to be, a 750kg Venter will never have this concern. The brakes need some way to stop the vehicle and the torque of them has to go somewhere, it can only go in to the axle and that is held by the springs. A light trailer will have less torque energy going in to the springs than a heavily loaded one. I have replaced quite a few spring packs where the main blade has failed, the majority of these failures are in front of the axle. I am sure this is because of the metal fatique from warping

    On the racing cars we use a 3 link or a ladder bar suspension, we lift the front of the car by the torque of the rear axle. That is a 8,5l old style cast iron v8 in the front of a full metal Camaro with gearbox and dikgat pilot in front of the axle, you can just imagine the warping that would be on that axle if it did not have proper bracing.

    This is a similar set up although smaller and I get the different radius concern. This stabiliser could even be a source of warping on the spring, there is adifference in the arc of the spring blade and that stabiliser and that would create energy when it moves up and down. The only place this has to go is in to the blade spring, how much.....I can not say but I am sure one of the engineers can take an educated guess
    Henk
    Adventure is out there go find it

    Fitment and trailer service. Agent for SnoMaster & Tentco
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