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  1. #1
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    Default Cost Effective Overlanding

    This is similar to other threads, but also on it's own... but what value for money?

    Dare I say… the new LC 300, Pathfinder, Land Rovers and the like, are all awesome and fantastic vehicles, but I think it’s a little bit like having a very expensive diamond necklace for the missus, which I may add will be much cheaper. One may revel on all the 4x4 and overland capabilities, but like an expensive necklace, will you do that often? She will not wear a R100k necklace every day, balloon that a bit, will you take your 1.2m to 1.8m monster to do bundu bashing? My mind boggles, but if this what you want to do and can do, so enjoy what must be close to the pinnacle of driving!

    I want to do a bit of off-road, not having done so before, and are looking at either a very good condition Isuzu Trooper advertised on this site, or a P Series double cab. My heart is for the Trooper at the moment. With that, I can do whatever the R1.8m car can do for under 100k and have a lot of petrol and beer money spare. Actually, for the price compared to the LC300, I can buy another Trooper every second month for three years, beating the warranty period of the LC300 while saving handily on insurance.

    But… it all boils down to what we really want and can afford. Thus, I am not marking down those who go the premium route, in fact I hope they have an amazing experience, but I am more for the basics and glad for that. Just had a thought! On this forum is the video of 38 years of 4x4, where there are bush scratches on the bumpers and wheel fairings of a new LD 4 at the 34:57 mark! 😊 Naturally, if I do get the Trooper, I will endeavour to keep her in premium shape, but any bush scratches are not going to pop any financial circuit breakers. In fact, in the bush, I will steer the Trooper where we want to go without any worry.

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...ing-4x4s-video
    In the market

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    Nissan Safari or early Patrol stationwagon with a working aircon and an RD28 or TD42 turbo would do 99% of what I need I reckon.
    Jakes Louw
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

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  4. #3
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    Nissan Safari or early Patrol stationwagon with a working aircon and an RD28 or TD42 turbo would do 99% of what I need I reckon.
    Thank you Jakes. Your Jeep has also been proposed as a good option. The thing I am most scared of (with any second hand car), is having to start a service center next to a random dune... But new cars also break. My one friend swears by Jeep... as long as the engine and transmission keeps going, one can make a plan.
    In the market

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    An xj will also work
    Jakes Louw
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    Sorry, but is there a question in there somewhere?
    Beat-up rat rod of a '96 Nissan Patrol that bears the evidence of many wonderful adventures (and a few stupid indiscretions).

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Connan View Post
    Sorry, but is there a question in there somewhere?
    Ha thanks, but no... it's only my opinion, which is certainly biased against paying premium money for some brands. It is only to provoke thought as to what you get for what you pay. But it is for you to decide what is worthwhile!
    In the market

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  9. #7
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    We all go through it I guess.

    My personal journey started off with basic 4x4's but as life happens, you upgrade. I ended with the Touareg and I used it for what it was built. I did heavy 4x4 tracks and pulled the bush lapa where it should not have gone. But, I realised it is not a toy....so I got a 105 cruiser and gave the Touareg to my wife.

    As I am sitting here, in Rundu, the Touareg is an awesome vehicle, capable of gobbling up the miles and if needed, transform into a low range monster. But I will use the cruiser for rough stuff.
    Gert Grobler

    VW Touareg V6 Tdi Escape; Land Cruiser 105
    Bush Lapa Boskriek 816

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  11. #8
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    Nothing wrong with a second hand vehicle, if you maintain it. Many shy away because maintenance and repairs are more frequent, and expensive, if you have to replace main components like engine and transmissions. But then, compare this cost to that of a new vehicle, which is in excess of 1bar, then the 100k engine replacement does not sound too expensive.

    We bought a refurbished 1988 Bots Defender PUP in about 2000 for R24k. It took us on our first 4x4 trip into Namibia, albeit slowly with it's 2.5l petrol engine. I found a tdi engine and gearbox, about 250k km old, for R18k, and installed that. I also built an aluminium canopy with drawer system for it and added an aircon. This vehicle took us on all our serious trips. Maintenance was cheap when compared to servicing costs of my Disco3 which I now drive as a platcar.

    Our camper requirements were based on the capabilities of this Defender. The D3 is very capable and extremely comfortable. But when it comes to tricky sections, I would still feel more comfortable to do these with the old Defender, which is still pottering around daily in Dbn with a new owner.
    Mike Lauterbach

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  13. #9
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    Look, I've always said the view is the same from the windscreen, regardless of brand.

    I went the route of what is in essence an 18 year old vehicle that needs a lot of work to get to the point of my overlander / holiday vehicle because that is what my personal circumstances dictated. I had a choice, second hand and fixing or nothing and day dreaming.

    But these are my personal circumstances. Mine.
    If i had the abilities to be in a brand new 76 series, kitted to the hilt. Or any other brand, you choose. I would be. There would be a lot of peace of mind for a doubting family.
    Would I use it as designed? Of course I would.
    But my choice allows me to work towards a goal and get there a lot sooner than if I was waiting for something newer.
    Do i get jealous? No, I get inspired.

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  15. #10
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    Default Re: Cost Effective Overlanding

    No Pointer 41 respect and all that but it does not all boil down to what we really want and can afford. Its about how hard we are prepared to work and how determined and stubborn we are. All basic maintenance and much more we can do ourselves. With a sewing mschine and otherwise drill, factory bought aluminium, stainless steel bolts and nylocks, a decent sealant, connect-it jointing when needed etc and forum and youtube input we can make a lot of what we need ourselves. Also bear in mind the principles: Weight (light as possible) speed (fast as possible) and space (small as possible) and within those parameters as strong and long lasting as possible - whilst striving to keep it simple. Also when all is said and done the job is to get ourselves and travel companions in to where we are going and just as importantly out again safely and in one piece. Really does not matter what anything looks like so long so it does the job. Done

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