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  1. #1
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    Default Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    I avoid roads taken by heavy trucks. Years ago this meant moving from national to provincial roads. However, due to toll avoidance, truckers are hauling on the provincial roads and pulverising them leaving long stretches of potholes.

    The Western Cape may have stretches of 10-minute stop-go for one-lane traffic, but at least they are fixing the potholes. However, for the other five provincial roads just travelled, there seemed to a progressive degradation in roads from the Eastern Cape, Northern Cape to the remaining three: Free State, Mapumalanga and Limpopo.

    Many small towns have resorted to massive speed bumps, usually about six of them. They may have been painted originally, but many are no longer easily distinguishable.

    Three years ago, Morgenzon's main intersection was just a massive pothole. The heavy trucks dipped down and rose up the other side of a massive pond between the cornering buildings. Three weeks ago, it appeared that the town folk had closed the route to all vehicular traffic (in protest to the truckers?). This week, the town has a new level, tarred intersection...some progress. Wouldn't it be nice if all of the potholes were fixed.

    Now it appears that I will need to travel the national roads again to avoid the heavy trucks. Pity that Transnet was destroyed and everything has to be hauled over our roads.
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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Dassie View Post
    ....... Pity that Transnet was destroyed and everything has to be hauled over our roads.
    Thank the last few old era transport ministers for that. They started allowing more and more truck transport (own interest? friends / sponsors interest?). And from there it went from bad to worse.
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  4. #3
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    The main issue is that municipalities do not use the money to fix roads but rather to buy politicians a new BMW.

    Lydenburg is a great example of this. The town and surrounding roads are a mess because no maintenance is done, the solution they have come up with is not to do the repairs but rather they just ban all heavy vehicles from using the roads. That is a complete stuff up because the town is on the route between various chrome mines and the harbours. This creates enormous inefficiencies in the transport industry. In addition, the transporters provide income to the locals in the form of diesel depots, mechanics, prostitutes and all the other trucking related industries.

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  6. #4
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Anybody here seen voetspore program where they traversed other African countries? Seen their bad roads and trucks all over? We are going that way. Good thing we all have (hopefully) a 4x4

    T I A
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  8. #5
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    The same with roads in Eastern Transvaal where it used to be a bikers paradise. The trucks that haul log and what not have turned these roads into death traps. I have heard of a couple of fatalities in the area due to road conditions. The policing and fixing of roads in non existent but heaven help you when you are 5km/h over speed limit. Making easy money for de noo BMW EISH

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  10. #6
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    As Mike N pointed out, the regulations regarding road transport started to relax during the previous regime's tenure.

    Other contributors leading to the increase in transport and hence the impact on the roads include, but are not limited to:

    1. Increase in imported products requiring transport from ports
    2. Increase in exports (post sanctions) requiring transport to ports
    3. Some commodities like coal, mines are becoming increasingly further away from the use areas
    4. New mines
    5. Decay, degradation and redundancy in conveyor systems, from mine to use areas
    6. Increase in the number of retail outlets and locations across the country all requiring regular replenishment
    7. Increase in 3PL consolidation points leading to an increase in larger capacity trucks on both primary and secondary distribution cycles
    8. Increase in cross-border transport (post sanctions)
    9. Under-utilised load capacity increasing delivery frequencies (where a truck carries less than its rated capacity due to incorrect fleet mix). A study indicated that almost 30% of trucks in Urban cycles are not carrying their full capacities.
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  12. #7
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    The collapsed railway system also contributes to an increase in trucks on the roads.
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  14. #8
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by Half-Pint View Post
    The main issue is that municipalities do not use the money to fix roads but rather to buy politicians a new BMW.
    There is a movement to bypass the municipalities.

    This video explains it


    You can find the website here:

    https://www.taxpayersunion.co.za

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  16. #9
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    What happened to the railways? Amersfoort had a beautiful station where we picked up and dropped of goods. Bhyatt who has been there forever used to get his goods delivered by rail and then just collect from the station. That included groceries and all the other paraphernalia that he sold back in the day. Same goes for Leslie (now Leandra) Kinross, Bethal, Volksrust, Standerton etc. etc. etc. The list goes on. I should know. Have and had family that stayed all over Transvaal and can still remember all the goods that got delivered by rail to the towns. How else did Riekie Deysel and Eduan van der Merwe get to be in possession of a whole box of Krunch chocolates? They nabbed it from the pile of goods destined for the corner cafee in Leslie.

    Fact is, travel through SA and you will see the overgrown railway lines (Van der Hoff road to Brits is a good example). I so wish I did more of the Pta to Cullinan rail trips by steam when I had the chance. Just another memory that my kids will never get to enjoy.

    Trucking companies must have connections, that is why the railways have been run down to the point of non-existence.
    HENK


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  18. #10
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Four in court over 130 tons of stolen railway tracks worth R8m
    Quote Originally Posted by Henkus View Post
    What happened to the railways?

    ...

    Trucking companies must have connections, that is why the railways have been run down to the point of non-existence.
    It's because the national pastime in South Africa is stealing.

    The railway tracks get stolen, so the trains can't travel safely.

    The overhead lines get stolen.

    The diesel for locomotives gets stolen.

    So with all of the above, the trains don't travel.

    Because the trains don't travel, the tracks get stolen more.

    Tracks can't be replaced, because money earmarked for infrastructure maintenance, is stolen.

    The more the trains don't travel, the more the tracks get stolen.




    Last edited by Michael9980; 2021/05/20 at 11:47 AM.

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  20. #11
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by Henkus View Post
    Trucking companies must have connections, that is why the railways have been run down to the point of non-existence.
    I dont agree with you here Henkus. Trucking has responded to increased demand due to the decline in rail, especially on the Primary Routes. Rail has a role to play in primary and secondary distribution but also lacks flexibility in complex distribution scenarios, which, in many if not most instances, would increase overall transport costs and lead times if rail participated in some of the routes.

    I can get my products in Midrand direct from the port. Imagine if it had to be loaded on to rail, shunted at various points, offloaded at a rail head and then transported to me in Midrand, the time and cost not to mention all of the additional handling and risks thereof............ no thanks.

    Mismanagement combined with a lack of flexibility and increased lead times have all contributed to truckers responding to demand. The current government is incapable of managing complex modern systems, rail being one of them.
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  22. #12
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    If rail was efficient , cost effective or practical it would still exist.
    The problem is not the movement from rail to trucks, the problem is the funding to maintain the roads that disappeared.

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  24. #13
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by Estee View Post
    ...

    I can get my products in Midrand direct from the port. Imagine if it had to be loaded on to rail, shunted at various points, offloaded at a rail head and then transported to me in Midrand, the time and cost not to mention all of the additional handling and risks thereof............ no thanks.

    Mismanagement combined with a lack of flexibility and increased lead times have all contributed to truckers responding to demand. The current government is incapable of managing complex modern systems, rail being one of them.
    I don't think that the problem necessarily lies with consumer goods being transported by trucks. This would make sense being transported by trucks, vans etc, as this would be more cost-effective.


    The problem is with the transport of raw comodities like coal, platinum, chromium, manganese and other mined materials to ports and other destinations.


    These raw comodities used to be transported by railway, which was more cost-effective. But now, because of the failing railway infrastructure, these raw materials are transported by trucks by the million tons across our roads.

    Take Natro Freight for example. They move about 80,000 tons of platinum a month with their trucks in the North-West and Limpopo area. That is just shy of 1,000,000 tons a year. That is just 1 logistic company.

    About 16.5 million tons of chromium is mined a year, that's mostly transported by trucks.
    250 million tons of coal needs to be transported a year in South Africa.

    In these instances, it makes sense to use railway, but they are forced to transport most of it with trucks.
    Last edited by Michael9980; 2021/05/20 at 12:18 PM.

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  26. #14
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael9980 View Post
    I don't think that the problem necessarily lies with consumer goods being transported by trucks. This would make sense being transported by trucks, vans etc, as this would be more cost-effective.


    The problem is with the transport of raw materials like coal, platinum and other mined materials to ports or other destinations.


    These raw materials used to be transported by train, which was more cost-effective. But now, because of the failing railway infrastructure, these raw materials are transported by trucks by the million tons across our roads.
    My post, Post #6 above refers:

    As Mike N pointed out, the regulations regarding road transport started to relax during the previous regime's tenure.

    Other contributors leading to the increase in transport and hence the impact on the roads include, but are not limited to:

    1. Increase in imported products requiring transport from ports
    2. Increase in exports (post sanctions) requiring transport to ports
    3. Some commodities like coal, mines are becoming increasingly further away from the use areas
    4. New mines
    5. Decay, degradation and redundancy in conveyor systems, from mine to use areas

    6. Increase in the number of retail outlets and locations across the country all requiring regular replenishment
    7. Increase in 3PL consolidation points leading to an increase in larger capacity trucks on both primary and secondary distribution cycles
    8. Increase in cross-border transport (post sanctions)
    9. Under-utilised load capacity increasing delivery frequencies (where a truck carries less than its rated capacity due to incorrect fleet mix). A study indicated that almost 30% of trucks in Urban cycles are not carrying their full capacities.
    Estee = S T = Sean Towlson

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  28. #15
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Last trip to jhb we stopped at one of the ultracities for fuel etc. There was a book being sold that gives routes to avoid toll roads
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  30. #16
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by Estee View Post
    My post, Post #6 above refers:

    As Mike N pointed out, the regulations regarding road transport started to relax during the previous regime's tenure.

    Other contributors leading to the increase in transport and hence the impact on the roads include, but are not limited to:

    1. Increase in imported products requiring transport from ports
    2. Increase in exports (post sanctions) requiring transport to ports
    3. Some commodities like coal, mines are becoming increasingly further away from the use areas
    4. New mines
    5. Decay, degradation and redundancy in conveyor systems, from mine to use areas

    6. Increase in the number of retail outlets and locations across the country all requiring regular replenishment
    7. Increase in 3PL consolidation points leading to an increase in larger capacity trucks on both primary and secondary distribution cycles
    8. Increase in cross-border transport (post sanctions)
    9. Under-utilised load capacity increasing delivery frequencies (where a truck carries less than its rated capacity due to incorrect fleet mix). A study indicated that almost 30% of trucks in Urban cycles are not carrying their full capacities.
    I apologise, I might have misunderstood your previous post then. Your example of products being tansported from port to Midrand made me assume you were largely reffering to consumer goods.

    But from the above reply I see you include comodities.

    I still don't think that all of the imported and consumer goods can have such a big impact on the road infrastructure as the transportation of comidities have.

    In a perfect economy, the transport of most comodities would be by railway, and most consumer goods (and imported goods) to retail destinations by trucks.

  31. #17
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    In the "OLD" days:
    Rail was used extensively with many private businesses even having their own rail "sidings" / tracks to their premises.

    We used to collect our freight from the railway station in George, only about 2 Km from my Dad's factory.
    It was cheaper than road freight at the time and took a week from supplier to us - but then the plan was adjusted for that reliable (then) delivery time.

    We used to have a SAR&H account which was South African Railway and Harbour Services.
    Paid monthly (Sort of).

    I agree with sentiments above that they rail service should be restored for the heavy duty ore, coal, commodities, etc. and leave the other to the trucking industry.

    Of course the revenue streams need to be correctly utilized.
    Last edited by Peter1949; 2021/05/20 at 01:02 PM. Reason: Correcting acronym
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  32. #18
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Delivery time with railways became eventually an issue. They had the monopoly thus nobody else could transport goods where there were a railway line. Trucks then needed a specials permit to transport goods. And eventually this railway monopoly had to go.

    Yes trucks do put a much higher load on the roads , but that is covered with fuel levies and license fee etc, but that money is not use for that.

    Social relating spending are much more important then economics in Africa.

    All Namibia public roads are basic toll roads, al fuel levies, license mass distance charges are paid it a road fund which is used for maintenance. The politicians did not liked that and tried several times to sabotage the system, but luckily it survived. All 'non economic' roads must be build by the Government, from tax payers money and with not road users. So far so good!
    Last edited by JLK; 2021/05/20 at 01:31 PM.
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  34. #19
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    Quote Originally Posted by JLK View Post
    Delivery time with railways became eventually an issue. They had the monopoly thus nobody else could transport goods where there were a railway line. Trucks then needed a specials permit to transport goods. And eventually this railway monopoly had to go.

    Yes trucks do put a much higher load on the roads , but that is covered with fuel levies and license fee etc, but that money is not use for that.

    Social relating spending are much more important then economics in Africa.

    All Namibia public roads are basic toll roads, al fuel levies, license mass distance charges are paid it a road fund which is used for maintenance. The politicians did not liked that and tried several times to sabotage the system, but luckily it survived. All 'non economic' roads must be build by the Government, from tax payers money and with not road users. So far so good!
    Delivery times started becoming an issue in the late 1990's already. I used to get the small 3t containers from Gauteng delivered here to the farm. It took 2 or 3 days if I remember correctly. They were dropped off in Pmb and then transported by road to us.

    Then they became clever and streamlined the operation. The Pmb depot was done away with, "saving costs", and all containers were sent to Dbn, another odd 100km away to their depot there, from where they were dispatched. This added another day, sometime 2, to the delivery time. This is when we switched over to road freight, which was quicker at about the same price.

    The only way to stop the theft of further railway structures is to legalise culling of the thieves. I'm afraid, that no current and future generation will ever see any goods trains in the countryside again in this country.
    Mike Lauterbach

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  36. #20
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    Default Re: Heavy trucks avoid tolls

    I stay in Kilner Park in Pretoria, basically at the junction of two of the largest rail way lines of days gone by, and a few hundred meters from the main transnet depot.

    every single night there are teams steeling copper wire, or rail tracks or something else in the depot, itís a never ending story. You can report it to the cops till you are blue in the face, they donít do anything. Transnet cancelled their contract with the private security company that was supposed to be guarding the depot, and since then itís a free for all. They have their own in house security, but not very effective. Once in a while you hear a shotgun shot go off when the security make an attempt to chase the robbers off, and then the neighbourhood dogs bark as the tsotsis run away, just to return a few hours later.

    they are brazen, they arrive with bakkies, power tools amps lights to come and cut up and steal infrastructure. They know nothing will happen to them. Itís not going to improve. I think the destruction of the railways is beyond repair now. The entire network will need to be built up from scratch again if they intend putting it back in use.

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