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  1. #1
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    Default Sherline Lathe and Milling Machine

    Six years ago I bought a Sherline 4100 Lathe and a Sherline Milling Machine simply as they were a bargain at the time. Paid R 3k for both. The time has come to get them operational as I have some work for them.

    I am not unfamiliar with machining but on significantly larger equipment. I want to buy accessories but would like a little advice.

    The Lathe came without a chuck but with a face plate. It also has no tool post.
    - There are two Chuck options, a 2.5" (R 3k) and a 3.1" (R3.6k), will the larger be worth the additional cost?
    - There are 3 tool post options; standard non adjustable (R0.5k) , quick change post (R?) and then the compound slide (estimated R4,3k) with standard tool post. I cannot see how one could do without the compound slide? I am also hoping to make some of my own tooling so need to cut morse tapers.
    - I need to get the two morse taper centers, one for the head stock and the other for the tailstock. The dog for the faceplate.
    - I also need to get a drill chuck.
    - The lathe has handwheels without a settable Zero. I would like the settable Zero but they come at a cost of circa R 0.7k each, rather expensive. Comments?

    The Mill has a vice but what else would I need. I am considering an indexing chuck?

    All the above and I am in for around R 11k shipped but excluding any duties and VAT. I am keen to not buy stuff I don't really need.

    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sherline Lathe and Milling Machine

    It depends what work you intend doing and I have no concept of scale but you paid very little. Would a larger lathe not suit your purposes a little better .Sherline is pretty small ,arent they.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Sherline Lathe and Milling Machine

    3K for a small chuck .Wow. A dog is simple to make . Could you not make your own toolpost using a chunk of aluminum and your own milling machine to get you going. I seldom use my compound but when you need it you need it.

    You can turn tapers without a compound.But it may be impractical.I suspect it takes a one morse or is it even smaller. Can you put a dti on this machine or is it too small to mount a magnetic base. Then you wouldnt need a dial with zero.

    Could you not make your own dial with graduations on the the lathe itself. If you know the pitch of the crosslide feedscrew you could machine a handle and print out a big graduation which could be stuck on some masonite and attached to the end the the headstock spindle. Then using the lathe as a shaper mark the graduations onto the new handle dial.
    This could work out pretty accurate.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sherline Lathe and Milling Machine

    Definitely get the biggest chuck you can.

    Drill and tap a hole on the left nearest corner of the carriage, get a magnetic base setup for a dial indicator, un-screw the shaft from the mag base and mount it on the carriage using the hole mentioned. In doing so, you can arrange the dial gauge to contact either the head-stock or the cross-slide, thus giving you adjustable and very accurate measurement on either axis. Not a huge range of motion, but enough for most uses, especially if you set it up to show you the end of the cut. You could possibly accommodate two dial gauges in this way, one for each axis.

    A rudimentary toolpost should be reasonably easy to fabricate. As Plunger said, a compound slide is necessary for some jobs but not for all. For cutting morse tapers, it is not ideal and a taper-cutting attachment would be a far better option. You could make one of those up for yourself. This Old Tony on Youtube has a good video on what it needs to look like and how it works.
    Quick-change is a nice-to-have, and actually only if you have a fair quantity of the holders. If the quick-change post comes with only one or two tool holders, just forget it or factor in the cost of a few more.

    For the mill, the sky is the limit and it really depends on what you want to make. Tooling and adapters for a milling machine in a home-shop environment can get flippin expensive flippin quickly.
    Beat-up rat rod of a '96 Nissan Patrol that bears the evidence of many wonderful adventures (and a few stupid indiscretions).

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