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    Unhappy Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Wondering how many members in the forum would say this description fits their lifestyle I think Tedx2 as he does not return to a home between excursions. I recall someone else here as well , though I may be mixing that up with someone on Overland Africa. In less than 3 months I think SWAMBO and I will just start down this path, having now just sold off nearly everything we have and whenever we return to the home country it is just for a visit before we return to the the vehicle. Its a bit mind boggling wrapping my head around what we are going to be doing and looking for words of wisdom from those that also don’t have a home., feeling bit "out there" now


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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    I'm not too hung up on descriptions, however we do have a home base, travel on shorter trips frequently during periods of a year or so, then take a year to travel on longer trips:

    in the last decade - 11 months around South America, 3 months in SE Asia, 10 months in Africa, and 10 months in Australia, along with shorter trips in Europe, the "Americas", Africa, and Asia.

    However we are not "permanent travellers" in the sense of having no home base, so I guess it doesn't fit us.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by alannymarce View Post
    I'm not too hung up on descriptions, however we do have a home base, travel on shorter trips frequently during periods of a year or so, then take a year to travel on longer trips:

    in the last decade - 11 months around South America, 3 months in SE Asia, 10 months in Africa, and 10 months in Australia, along with shorter trips in Europe, the "Americas", Africa, and Asia.

    However we are not "permanent travellers" in the sense of having no home base, so I guess it doesn't fit us.

    Hi Alan, I see from your blog that you are often away traveling and lots of experience, way more than we have. The phrase came to mind as we were often asked by folks that came to the auction viewings were we were "moving to" ( the auction was advertised as a moving auction). Since we were not moving any where, I was explaining our plans, and trying to come with some short explanation to these queries. About this same time, we realized that overlanding is going to be our lifestyle..until it's not, and we don't know when that will be, how many continents we may go to this way, so a short phrase that looks like a label came to mind. I'm wondering out loud what it is going to feel like knowing there is no set place to return to while traveling, that traveling is a permanent state of being (probably no more than 1 month under the same roof/location for the foreseeable future). I guess I'll know soon enough..we leave our home in three days and then are staying with family and friends in various locales in the US before heading over to Africa. Kind of a like a slow entry into being truly nomadic.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    You'll be wanting to watch this , then.

    Frances McDormand is a fantastic actress, and should bring a really genuine interpretation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomadland_(film)

    Just won 3 Oscars, so should surely be pretty eye-opening -on US Nomads -and the lifestyle in general.

    I look forward to watching this when it becomes available.

    "The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence."

    - Charles Bukowski

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick L View Post
    You'll be wanting to watch this , then.

    Frances McDormand is a fantastic actress, and should bring a really genuine interpretation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomadland_(film)

    Just won 3 Oscars, so should surely be pretty eye-opening -on US Nomads -and the lifestyle in general.

    I look forward to watching this when it becomes available.


    Its a good documentary we watched it recently. I had the impression that many of the folks were economic nomads and there was some financial difficulties driving some of the actions and mindset IIRC. We could have simply stayed on our ranch and lived the "aging in place" lifestyle with occasional travel and expeditions but decided to go and have an adventure without end as a lifestyle , at least we hope to see it that way once we are in it

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Bud, I am not sure if you know of this couple that have been overlanding the world, including Africa, in their old Land Cruiser. We met them in Kenya and Ethiopia during 2015. True Global Nomadic Overlanders.

    Not the most glib of serial reports, but interesting because of its uniqueness

    http://www.weltrekordreise.ch/a_starte.html
    Stanley Weakley.
    Toyota Landcruiser 76SW 4,2L diesel.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...-6-SLOW-DONKEY
    OR
    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    Bud, I am not sure if you know of this couple that have been overlanding the world, including Africa, in their old Land Cruiser. We met them in Kenya and Ethiopia during 2015. True Global Nomadic Overlanders.

    Not the most glib of serial reports, but interesting because of its uniqueness

    http://www.weltrekordreise.ch/a_starte.html

    Hi Stan, yes had occasioned on it, and like a feast it's hard to know where to start after seeing the statistics the couple maintains. I think I would be in awe meeting them and if I ever stumbled into their neighborhood I would see if I could do that., what was your take on your meeting with them...is it in the slow donkey repot?. If yes, I have all your reports and will read about it once we hit the road in a few days....In fact I think I will read the entire slow donkey reports again ( never finished the first time last year) A life time of overlanding, its hard to fathom.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    I follow Graeme Bell on Instagram. Them and their two kids have had their landy as their home for several years now.
    i must say, to be honest, every time I see their updates I have an underlying feeling of uncomfortableness. As much as i love travel, I wouldn’t be able to function knowing I don’t have a base.
    it takes a very brave person to undertake this. Good luck!
    Graham Robertson
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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    An interesting state to consider! For sure I think there is quite some difference between Nomadland and your plans. Perhaps the land based version is less common or less well documented, but certainly the sailing cruising community has many many 'homeless' wanderers sailing about the globe. Might be interesting to take a look at some cruising blogs or forums, you might find more people in a similar state.

    I think you are signed up for a grand adventure. Even though I suspect you don't have a 'firm foundation of financial unrest', I offer you some Sterling Hayden:

    To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea... "cruising" it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

    "I've always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can't afford it."

    What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone. What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense, and we know it.

    But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade. The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.

    Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life?
    Sterling Hayden

    Every time I read this it makes me want to quit my job and set forth!
    Last edited by CalDriver; 2021/04/27 at 07:37 PM.
    Blog of our African travels: stuckinlowgear.com

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by CalDriver View Post
    An interesting state to consider! For sure I think there is quite some difference between Nomadland and your plans. Perhaps the land based version is less common or less well documented, but certainly the sailing cruising community has many many 'homeless' wanderers sailing about the globe. Might be interesting to take a look at some cruising blogs or forums, you might find more people in a similar state.

    I think you are signed up for a grand adventure. Even though I suspect you don't have a 'firm foundation of financial unrest', I offer you some Sterling Hayden:

    To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea... "cruising" it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

    "I've always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can't afford it."

    What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone. What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense, and we know it.

    But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade. The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.

    Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life?
    Sterling Hayden

    Every time I read this it makes me want to quit my job and set forth!

    Well Hello Andrew always great to get your input, someday me thinks you will also set sail so to speak. Good thought that seafarers are similar species but another breed in so many ways, and they are not on this forum..they must hand out somewhere though/. Your very well read in my opinion and enjoyed the quotes Food for thought and some truth there. I feel sometimes I am most alive when most at risk or in difficult conditions during our adventures, solving problems and making it through....but always to return home. Now, the goal is to get to the evening camp

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    I follow Graeme Bell on Instagram. Them and their two kids have had their landy as their home for several years now.
    i must say, to be honest, every time I see their updates I have an underlying feeling of uncomfortableness. As much as i love travel, I wouldn’t be able to function knowing I don’t have a base.
    it takes a very brave person to undertake this. Good luck!
    Thank you Graham. I see that Graeme has a presence on the overland journal site and has podcasts and books. Going to listen for sure. I'm assuming Mary and I can handle the mental aspects of being without a home , but probably wont know for a while whether that's true. SO seems like few fulltime over landers are frequenting this forum. Well, I am not going away so your all stuck with me!

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    We, too, have met and/or read about long term overlanders. The Swiss couple are one of many. Some of them stay put for long periods and it is not clear whether they do go “home” now and again.

    My question has always been how one, without any homebase, deals with the bureaucracy that we cannot, in the modern world, avoid: renewing passports, renewing debit and credit cards, medical insurance, money, banks, pensions and/or investments and, of course, the taxman. These things are never going to go away and have to be dealt with.

    I have a feeling that many long term overlanders (as opposed to economic nomads as in Nomadland), actually do stay put in places for long periods. The Argentinian family in a vintage car are a case in point.

    All the very best for your nomadic life, Bud. If this forum doesn’t hear from you, I will personally track you down over the ether!

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Bud3 View Post
    Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Wondering how many members in the forum would say this description fits their lifestyle I think Tedx2 as he does not return to a home between excursions. I recall someone else here as well , though I may be mixing that up with someone on Overland Africa. In less than 3 months I think SWAMBO and I will just start down this path, having now just sold off nearly everything we have and whenever we return to the home country it is just for a visit before we return to the the vehicle. Its a bit mind boggling wrapping my head around what we are going to be doing and looking for words of wisdom from those that also don’t have a home., feeling bit "out there" now

    My fav overlanders that I follow are GrizzlyNbear Overland. They've been travelling the world in their Defender for the last 4yrs. I shared a post of theirs with you already. I highly recommend their youtube videos.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    We, too, have met and/or read about long term overlanders. The Swiss couple are one of many. Some of them stay put for long periods and it is not clear whether they do go “home” now and again.

    My question has always been how one, without any homebase, deals with the bureaucracy that we cannot, in the modern world, avoid: renewing passports, renewing debit and credit cards, medical insurance, money, banks, pensions and/or investments and, of course, the taxman. These things are never going to go away and have to be dealt with.

    I have a feeling that many long term overlanders (as opposed to economic nomads as in Nomadland), actually do stay put in places for long periods. The Argentinian family in a vintage car are a case in point.

    All the very best for your nomadic life, Bud. If this forum doesn’t hear from you, I will personally track you down over the ether!

    Well Hello WW, nice to hear from you and for the well wishes. Once in a while I stop in for a short read on something in the forum more as a distraction from our work to leave, and I see your helping/advising and story telling like normal so your well I take it. I don't get a sense that the bureaucracy is going to be a problem. We have a PO box for mail, a accountant that handles the taxes, and a management firm for the retirement. As we remain residents of our state, it seems like no problems but we shall see. We we come home once every few years to see our families or special events so one of those trips back we will renew passport and drivers license etc. The Swiss couple i Take it doesn't post on this forum (?). You won't need to look far for me, I'll be right here and your on my list to meet someday just in case you didn't know that already. There are 2 definite meet ups on the road with forum members this year and 1 other that might happen. I looking forward to that as well.

    so If I close and say to you "be well", is that Kuwa vizuri ?, and do folks use that phrase?

    Bud

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Bud3 View Post
    Well Hello WW, nice to hear from you and for the well wishes. Once in a while I stop in for a short read on something in the forum more as a distraction from our work to leave, and I see your helping/advising and story telling like normal so your well I take it. I don't get a sense that the bureaucracy is going to be a problem. We have a PO box for mail, a accountant that handles the taxes, and a management firm for the retirement. As we remain residents of our state, it seems like no problems but we shall see. We we come home once every few years to see our families or special events so one of those trips back we will renew passport and drivers license etc. The Swiss couple i Take it doesn't post on this forum (?). You won't need to look far for me, I'll be right here and your on my list to meet someday just in case you didn't know that already. There are 2 definite meet ups on the road with forum members this year and 1 other that might happen. I looking forward to that as well.

    so If I close and say to you "be well", is that Kuwa vizuri ?, and do folks use that phrase?

    Bud
    The other bureaucratic challenge that has always puzzled me about long term overlanders is how they deal with renewing a Carnet de Passage from their vehicle’s home country.

    Technically, for a Carnet de Passage, the vehicle must be licenced and roadworthy in its country of origin. For us in the UK, that means an annual MOT (Ministry of Transport) test and payment of the vehicle licence/road tax. The same is true for most countries. Unless one ships the vehicle back to its home country for the roadworthy tests etc, then, technically, a Carnet de Passage cannot be renewed. I know that the overland truck companies like Dragoman - who use UK-registered vehicles down through Africa and Asia - ship their huge trucks back to the UK periodically so that their vehicles remain legal.

    When we did our trip, the UK vehicle licensing authority did catch up with us. It wasnÂ’t simple and all the options open to us, a year into our trip, weren’t technically correct: in the end, we filled in the forms to say the vehicle had been exported from the UK which, technically, meant that the number plates were off their register. It is all a grey area. Luckily, the Carnet-issuing authority and the UK Drivers and Vehicle Licencing Authority don’t check with each other, but the question remains “is the vehicle legal in its home country?”.

    I have never used “kuwa vizuri”, but that’s not to say it isn’t used in Tanzania/coastal Kenya where they speak the pure form of Kiswahili. My Swahili is rather more “upcountry Kenya”. I’m sure everyone will love you for trying.

    Again, I wish you “fair winds and following seas”. Safari njema.
    Last edited by Wazungu Wawili; 2021/04/28 at 12:53 AM.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    WW, in my situation with a RSA registered vehicle, the carnet can be renewed by email with the SA AA, and having the new carnet couriered to a anther country where the vehicle is . I posted the detail on doing this in a different thread. So perhaps the peculiarities of the RSA registration and carnet facilitate this whereas it is more difficult in other countries. The downside to my situation is that I can not bring the vehicle to the USA, not even for a temporary time, as I remain a resident of my home country ( I remain a resident of the US unless I am actually granted residency ins some other country, which is unlikely I would seek,

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    The other bureaucratic challenge that has always puzzled me about long term overlanders is how they deal with renewing a Carnet de Passage from their vehicle’s home country.

    Technically, for a Carnet de Passage, the vehicle must be licenced and roadworthy in its country of origin. For us in the UK, that means an annual MOT (Ministry of Transport) test and payment of the vehicle licence/road tax. The same is true for most countries. Unless one ships the vehicle back to its home country for the roadworthy tests etc, then, technically, a Carnet de Passage cannot be renewed. I know that the overland truck companies like Dragoman - who use UK-registered vehicles down through Africa and Asia - ship their huge trucks back to the UK periodically so that their vehicles remain legal.

    When we did our trip, the UK vehicle licensing authority did catch up with us. It wasnÂ’t simple and all the options open to us, a year into our trip, weren’t technically correct: in the end, we filled in the forms to say the vehicle had been exported from the UK which, technically, meant that the number plates were off their register. It is all a grey area. Luckily, the Carnet-issuing authority and the UK Drivers and Vehicle Licencing Authority don’t check with each other, but the question remains “is the vehicle legal in its home country?”.

    I have never used “kuwa vizuri”, but that’s not to say it isn’t used in Tanzania/coastal Kenya where they speak the pure form of Kiswahili. My Swahili is rather more “upcountry Kenya”. I’m sure everyone will love you for trying.

    Again, I wish you “fair winds and following seas”. Safari njema.
    Some people with UK-registered vehicles put the car on "SORN" status. Ethically it's OK in my view since the vehicle is not being driven on roads in the UK, however I guess it's another gray area. We've renewed a carnet for a second 12 month period with no problem and there was no question on MOT.

    Although not relevant to this thread, although in theory we could have renewed our last carnet on our Colombian-registered vehicle but it's illegal to keep a vehicle out of the country for more than 12 months.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by Bud3 View Post
    WW, in my situation with a RSA registered vehicle, the carnet can be renewed by email with the SA AA, and having the new carnet couriered to a anther country where the vehicle is . I posted the detail on doing this in a different thread. So perhaps the peculiarities of the RSA registration and carnet facilitate this whereas it is more difficult in other countries. The downside to my situation is that I can not bring the vehicle to the USA, not even for a temporary time, as I remain a resident of my home country ( I remain a resident of the US unless I am actually granted residency ins some other country, which is unlikely I would seek,
    Yes, that’s true for all countries for at least one renewal, but if you read into the international agreement for the Carnet de Passage, it very clearly states that any vehicle being issued a Carnet de Passage in any country needs to be legal and roadworthy in their country of origin.

    A vehicle cannot possibly be legal if it hasn’t had the annual roadworthy tests and paid the road tax in its country of origin if it’s been out of that country for many years.

    I don’t understand why you, as a US citizen, can’t take a South African-registered vehicle into the US on a Carnet. But since your vehicle will be a South African-registered vehicle, it will be the South African licencing and roadworthy regulations that will need to be adhered to. And you will be dealing with the AA of South Africa for the Carnet.

    This subject has been debated many times on Horizons Unlimited. It remains a very grey area.
    Last edited by Wazungu Wawili; 2021/04/28 at 01:24 AM.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    Quote Originally Posted by alannymarce View Post
    Some people with UK-registered vehicles put the car on "SORN" status. Ethically it's OK in my view since the vehicle is not being driven on roads in the UK, however I guess it's another gray area. We've renewed a carnet for a second 12 month period with no problem and there was no question on MOT.

    Although not relevant to this thread, although in theory we could have renewed our last carnet on our Colombian-registered vehicle but it's illegal to keep a vehicle out of the country for more than 12 months.
    Technically, a vehicle on “SORN” has to be off the road and stored in the UK. I know many UK overlanders do this, but it is not telling the truth as the vehicle is roaming around the world. We looked into all the possibilities. As we were going to be eventually importing the vehicle into Kenya and it was never returning to the UK, we decided that filling in the export forms six months early was morally and legally the best option.

    Getting the second Carnet wasn’t a problem as our vehicle was within its MOT etc period. But the DVLA chased us once the MOT and road tax hadn’t been renewed.

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    Default Re: Global Nomadic Overlanders

    When we cargo shipped into Israel, the authorities there insisted on seeing our valid UK-issued MOT and road tax. Some countries are sticklers on whether a foreign vehicle is roadworthy and legal in its country of registration.

    In fact, in South Africa, we had to blag our case with the police once as we didn’t have a road tax disc on the windscreen. We were actually going through the export/SORN business at that time, but the SA police weren’t to know that. Luckily, it was actually true that the UK were stopping issuing the paper discs that one displayed on the windscreen and were going electronic.
    Last edited by Wazungu Wawili; 2021/04/28 at 01:44 AM.

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