Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX





Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 51
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    61
    Posts
    4
    Thanked: 1

    Default Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Hi there

    I am outfitting my Prado and before I take the plunge I would like to ask for your opinions on the Bundutop Rooftop tent with the electric deployment vs the Alucab/Quickpitch clamshell type tent. And now I see the iKamper also has an offering......

    Advice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,053
    Thanked: 1544

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Bundutop and Alucab are both good ( I don't know the others)

    So consider:
    1. Price
    2. Weight
    3. Height
    4. Space/size

    You are welcome to look at the one I have (Alu Cab)
    ZS1ETphonehome

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    61
    Posts
    4
    Thanked: 1

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Thanks for the reply. The Alucab tent is the one I see most often around here. They seem to be the most robust and popular, particularly with the Landcruiser people. I do like the clamshell design but some people tell me that the space is a little cramped in a three sided tent. I suppose it will all come down to personal preference.

    Thanks again....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,053
    Thanked: 1544

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    I really like my Alu Cab. But I do think it is small. I suppose it depends on the sleepers. I wouldn't want to share my space up there with someone - but it is very do-able.
    Some of the other clam shells may be bigger. I am not up to date with sizes - but it is possible that Alu Cab is also making a bigger one. I do find them awfully expensive though.
    There are several other threads on the forum regards RTT's you might want to search for more info.
    ZS1ETphonehome

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Midrand
    Posts
    612
    Thanked: 1612

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    I have the bundu- 30 second to set up. But the bigger deal to me is it will take both a mattress topper and bedding, plus 4 pillows, inside it. So we make the bed with all that and leave it. Not sure how much space inside there is for that in the alucab.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,053
    Thanked: 1544

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by heyyahhey View Post
    I have the bundu- 30 second to set up. But the bigger deal to me is it will take both a mattress topper and bedding, plus 4 pillows, inside it. So we make the bed with all that and leave it. Not sure how much space inside there is for that in the alucab.
    Just as good - all that and all my clothes and then some. In that regard space is really not a problem at all.
    More the side-by-side space for 2 bodies I would query in my Alu Cab.
    ZS1ETphonehome

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to EHoffmann For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Age
    31
    Posts
    63
    Thanked: 50

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    We recently went through this exercise and looked at various hardshell type tents.
    We searched so many threads and did the research on the different options.
    Although our setup was for an offroad trailer, I think the concept is similar.

    We ended up choosing the Bundutop.
    It is such a pleasure to park and just open/close the tent with the push of a button. It might seem like a lazy way to do it but compared to our previous RTT, we are not looking back. Most of the hardshell tents are quick and easy to set up though so it may be much of a muchness when it comes to this point.
    We initially were going to go with a larger, custom size Bundutop but decided that the standard size should be sufficient in terms of space.
    This was our only concern but after having used it many times now, the interior space is more than enough for us.

    Some additional pro's to the Bundutop from our experience:

    - X4 windows allow for great ventilation
    - Light inside the tent as standard
    - Option to add fans inside the tent
    - Bedding can be left inside the tent while travelling
    - Solar panel can be fitted to the roof and it is wired for this purpose as standard
    - Bundutec's service is brilliant!

    Good luck with your decision, I know it is not the easiest...
    Hilux 2.8 D/C 4X4 AT
    Metalian Maxi

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Midrand
    Posts
    612
    Thanked: 1612

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    The Bundu comes in a standard width but can be made wider for not much extra. If we had it to do over again, we'd of gone wider by a little bit...

    One small issue with the bundu - it uses a very small diameter bungee cord to help "pull" the awning bit inside as the tent lowers. These seem quite fragile - one already broke after about 15 nights. Extremely easy to fix - as it happens I will be at their place Wednesday to have the Bunduawn fitted - and they will sort this out - its a very minor niggle though.
    Last edited by heyyahhey; 2021/01/18 at 01:56 PM.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    32
    Posts
    3,439
    Thanked: 963

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    A while, not too long ago there was a long thread in the camping section on the Bundutop vs others, if I remember most people had a preference for the Bundutop with some good reasons.

    I casually watched some reviews on some of these hard shell tents in the past, after that the Bundutop came out tops in my opinion, though I must also say I've never been in the Alucab tent, only in the Bundutop and Eezi-awn.

    I also have experience with Bundutech's after sales service and if going by that, I'll also choose the Bundutop.
    "The problems we have today is because the guys who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living." - Magnus Heystek

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Simons Town
    Posts
    663
    Thanked: 1064

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Spent a very happy year full-time in a Bundutop...wouldn't consider any other brand...

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,053
    Thanked: 1544

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by Finn McCool View Post
    Spent a very happy year full-time in a Bundutop...wouldn't consider any other brand...
    That's only because it has a remote

    Sorry...
    ZS1ETphonehome

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to EHoffmann For This Useful Post:


  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Potgietersrus
    Age
    32
    Posts
    58
    Thanked: 222

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Also have a look at the Moremi Sport rooftop tent , there is a You tube review on it , last time that I requested a price it was round about R24 000. They had a special running for a while for R 19 000. Two size options a 1.4m and 1.5m same price.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Eli Stone For This Useful Post:


  16. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Harare & Brisbane
    Age
    61
    Posts
    487
    Thanked: 656

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by Frodo Bouch View Post
    Hi there

    I am outfitting my Prado and before I take the plunge I would like to ask for your opinions on the Bundutop Rooftop tent with the electric deployment vs the Alucab/Quickpitch clamshell type tent. And now I see the iKamper also has an offering......

    Advice?
    Did you decide which to go with and why? Thanks ..................
    John 2014 Toyota Hilux 4x4 3.0 D4D
    Baobab BL1715 "Kamba"
    "I never knew of a morning in Africa when I woke up and was not happy" - Ernest Hemingway

    Kgalagadi 2019 Namibia 2019 Gonarezhou 2019 Mana/Tafika 2018 Kgalagadi 2017 Lion, Hippo, Eland Leguaan, Python

  17. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    East London
    Age
    67
    Posts
    4,967
    Thanked: 5295

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    John, could I please add my 2C worth here on the merits of the hard-top clamshell rooftop tent versus the Bundutop? I have an Alucab clamshell and have used this very sturdy design under testing circumstances for some years now with no problems.

    Pro clamshell;
    • The hardtop case adds plenty of sturdiness to the tent and provided one parks front (face) into the wind, this strong tent will withstand storms better than the Bundutop in my opinion and you will sleep better in wind. The V-shape helps too. My opinion!
    • Very easy to erect, only problem I have had is that the gas struts became a little sticky, lubrication sorted that out quickly. If the struts give up the ghost, easy to replace in any major town.
    • My Alucab has plenty of room for two to sleep, we change downstairs. I think at our age we would find it difficult to change inside, even in the Bundutop.
    • The aluminum casing helps to ensure that it is completely waterproof even in the worst of downpours. I am not sure this will always be the case with a flat canvas roof as opposed to a sloping aluminum one.


    Anti-Bundutop:
    • I know the electrical erection method has a mechanical override but the erection method is more technical and there is more that can go wrong.
    • I am not confident that the Bundutop will be able to carry as much mounted on its roof as the Alucab. I have two 130 watt solar panels and two Maxtrax mounted, with no problems as the aluminum casing and gas struts are so sturdy. The structure needs to be a little over-engineered to take the weight in testing conditions.
    Stanley Weakley.
    Toyota Landcruiser 76SW 4,2L diesel.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...-6-SLOW-DONKEY
    OR
    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

  18. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Stan Weakley For This Useful Post:


  19. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Midrand
    Posts
    612
    Thanked: 1612

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    John, could I please add my 2C worth here on the merits of the hard-top clamshell rooftop tent versus the Bundutop? I have an Alucab clamshell and have used this very sturdy design under testing circumstances for some years now with no problems.

    Pro clamshell;
    • The hardtop case adds plenty of sturdiness to the tent and provided one parks front (face) into the wind, this strong tent will withstand storms better than the Bundutop in my opinion and you will sleep better in wind. The V-shape helps too. My opinion!
    • Very easy to erect, only problem I have had is that the gas struts became a little sticky, lubrication sorted that out quickly. If the struts give up the ghost, easy to replace in any major town.
    • My Alucab has plenty of room for two to sleep, we change downstairs. I think at our age we would find it difficult to change inside, even in the Bundutop.
    • The aluminum casing helps to ensure that it is completely waterproof even in the worst of downpours. I am not sure this will always be the case with a flat canvas roof as opposed to a sloping aluminum one.


    Anti-Bundutop:
    • I know the electrical erection method has a mechanical override but the erection method is more technical and there is more that can go wrong.
    • I am not confident that the Bundutop will be able to carry as much mounted on its roof as the Alucab. I have two 130 watt solar panels and two Maxtrax mounted, with no problems as the aluminum casing and gas struts are so sturdy. The structure needs to be a little over-engineered to take the weight in testing conditions.

    Just for clarity - the bundutop is a solid aluminum roof - not canvas. I believe the roof load is rated for 20kg.

  20. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to heyyahhey For This Useful Post:


  21. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Harare & Brisbane
    Age
    61
    Posts
    487
    Thanked: 656

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    John, could I please add my 2C worth here on the merits of the hard-top clamshell rooftop tent versus the Bundutop? I have an Alucab clamshell and have used this very sturdy design under testing circumstances for some years now with no problems.

    Pro clamshell;
    • The hardtop case adds plenty of sturdiness to the tent and provided one parks front (face) into the wind, this strong tent will withstand storms better than the Bundutop in my opinion and you will sleep better in wind. The V-shape helps too. My opinion!
    • Very easy to erect, only problem I have had is that the gas struts became a little sticky, lubrication sorted that out quickly. If the struts give up the ghost, easy to replace in any major town.
    • My Alucab has plenty of room for two to sleep, we change downstairs. I think at our age we would find it difficult to change inside, even in the Bundutop.
    • The aluminum casing helps to ensure that it is completely waterproof even in the worst of downpours. I am not sure this will always be the case with a flat canvas roof as opposed to a sloping aluminum one.


    Anti-Bundutop:
    • I know the electrical erection method has a mechanical override but the erection method is more technical and there is more that can go wrong.
    • I am not confident that the Bundutop will be able to carry as much mounted on its roof as the Alucab. I have two 130 watt solar panels and two Maxtrax mounted, with no problems as the aluminum casing and gas struts are so sturdy. The structure needs to be a little over-engineered to take the weight in testing conditions.
    Thanks for your input Stan, appreciated as always. As you would have gathered this purchase is aimed at our 2022 East African trip, however in addition to that we will bring it back to Australia when we finally return. As a matter of interest Bundutop pricing in RSA is about ZAR31k, assuming we get VAT back, ZAR35k if we don't; Bundutop in Australia is ZAR64k!!! It is a tough decision, I really like the Bundutop, great YouTube reviews in RSA, Australia and USA, setup time is superb. Wind is an issue, rain appears to be a lesser one based on reviews. Yes, things can go wrong with the Bundutop, especially with my limited mechanical ability. The weight bearing of the Bundutop is set at 25kgs, not sure what the Alucab is rated at or indeed what your equipment weighs. I will now take a further look at the Alucab.
    John 2014 Toyota Hilux 4x4 3.0 D4D
    Baobab BL1715 "Kamba"
    "I never knew of a morning in Africa when I woke up and was not happy" - Ernest Hemingway

    Kgalagadi 2019 Namibia 2019 Gonarezhou 2019 Mana/Tafika 2018 Kgalagadi 2017 Lion, Hippo, Eland Leguaan, Python

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to Tedx2 For This Useful Post:


  23. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    East London
    Age
    67
    Posts
    4,967
    Thanked: 5295

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    I clearly was erroneous in stating that the Bundutop is a soft top, my apologies please.

    John, I clearly prefer the Alucab for a robust and long trip through Africa, far from sophisticated help. You raise and lower the clamshell easily under your own lifting power, assisted by a gas strut on either side, if they happen to give trouble gas struts are relatively easy to find in any moderately sized African city. I have had no trouble from mine in eight years now and do not know of problems for others. The Bundutop apparently has a more complicated electrically controlled raising system for its pop-up roof, although it has a mechanical over-ride, sounds more complicated to me for remote usage and problems have been reported.

    The size of the Alucab tent inside is fine, it has a great, firm mattress which we were very comfortable sleeping upon. Because of the clamshell shape when opened, the one ceiling is far lower than the other, My wife prefers sleeping with her head on the lower side which suites well. There are electrical leads to two reading lights on either side of the tent. The inside of the ceiling is quilted to prevent condensation of liquid inside of the tent ceiling in the frequent humid conditions, dripping inside a tent can drive you to distraction!

    There is a large zip-up netting plus canvass flap at the back and then again exactly the same on either side, 3 in all. Thus the ladder mount to the tent casing and the tent entrance can either be in the rear or on the sides, depending on the camping set up, preference, weather and locality. I have ladder attachments opposite all 3 potential entranced just in case. Only the rear entrance flap has a awning to raise for shade or protection against rain. The canvass flaps are inside the tent, but both the inner canvass flaps and the outer good quality mosquito netting, have those double-sided zips, so the flaps can be zipped up from inside or outside.

    This tent is very robust with its aluminum plate roof and boxed sides and if the opened end of the clamshell is faced away from a gale by moving the vehicle, it will withstand all but the most extreme winds. You can close the tent and travel with your bedding, pillows and other contents, within the closed tent. Our tent has never leaked either open or closed, in fairly extreme African downpours.

    The Alucab's biggest advantages is the simplicity and rapidity of deployment, its sturdiness, comfort and standard of manufacture. I would just advise lubricating all zips with graphite powder (locksmiths) or candle wax, so they run smoothly. Do not use oily lubricants, they attract African dust.

    Many ways of skinning a cat!
    Last edited by Stan Weakley; 2021/01/25 at 07:20 AM.
    Stanley Weakley.
    Toyota Landcruiser 76SW 4,2L diesel.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...-6-SLOW-DONKEY
    OR
    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

  24. The Following User Says Thank You to Stan Weakley For This Useful Post:


  25. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,167
    Thanked: 454

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    I clearly was erroneous in stating that the Bundutop is a soft top, my apologies please.

    John, I clearly prefer the Alucab for a robust and long trip through Africa, far from sophisticated help. You raise and lower the clamshell easily under your own lifting power, assisted by a gas strut on either side, if they happen to give trouble gas struts are relatively easy to find in any moderately sized African city. I have had no trouble from mine in eight years now and do not know of problems for others. The Bundutop apparently has a more complicated electrically controlled raising system for its pop-up roof, although it has a mechanical over-ride, sounds more complicated to me for remote usage and problems have been reported.

    The size of the Alucab tent inside is fine, it has a great, firm mattress which we were very comfortable sleeping upon. Because of the clamshell shape when opened, the one ceiling is far lower than the other, My wife prefers sleeping with her head on the lower side which suites well. There are electrical leads to two reading lights on either side of the tent. The inside of the ceiling is quilted to prevent condensation of liquid inside of the tent ceiling in the frequent humid conditions, dripping inside a tent can drive you to distraction!

    There is a large zip-up netting plus canvass flap at the back and then again exactly the same on either side, 3 in all. Thus the ladder mount to the tent casing and the tent entrance can either be in the rear or on the sides, depending on the camping set up, preference, weather and locality. I have ladder attachments opposite all 3 potential entranced just in case. Only the rear entrance flap has a awning to raise for shade or protection against rain. The canvass flaps are inside the tent, but both the inner canvass flaps and the outer good quality mosquito netting, have those double-sided zips, so the flaps can be zipped up from inside or outside.

    This tent is very robust with its aluminum plate roof and boxed sides and if the opened end of the clamshell is faced away from a gale by moving the vehicle, it will withstand all but the most extreme winds. You can close the tent and travel with your bedding, pillows and other contents, within the closed tent. Our tent has never leaked either open or closed, in fairly extreme African downpours.

    The Alucab's biggest advantages is the simplicity and rapidity of deployment, its sturdiness, comfort and standard of manufacture. I would just advise lubricating all zips with graphite powder (locksmiths) or candle wax, so they run smoothly. Do not use oily lubricants, they attract African dust.

    Many ways of skinning a cat!
    We own a Hannibal Impi which is made of fibreglass and it is on the canopy of my 79 Land Cruiser p/u. No issues but the shape and size is very similar to the Alucab. It is good into the wind
    either when driving or if turned with the lower side towards the wind when camping. We however find it very warm with 2 smaller windows at the side and the rear one with a fly sheet over it.

    The Bundutop with 4 large windows will be cooler and the fibreglass reinforced mosquito net is also far less restrictive than the shade net type of the Alucab, Hannibal and others. I started to
    look at Bundutop, either in 1.35 x 2.1 or 1.6 x 2.1. The other tent I like a lot is the Easy Awn Stealth. It is build like the Alucab but with a scissor mechanism at the lower end to allow for some
    clearance. The traditional fold open/close Easy Awn on my Colt is very well made so I have a lot respect for their quality.

    https://eezi-awn.com/product/stealth/

  26. The Following User Says Thank You to PierredW For This Useful Post:


  27. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Harare & Brisbane
    Age
    61
    Posts
    487
    Thanked: 656

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    I clearly was erroneous in stating that the Bundutop is a soft top, my apologies please.

    John, I clearly prefer the Alucab for a robust and long trip through Africa, far from sophisticated help. You raise and lower the clamshell easily under your own lifting power, assisted by a gas strut on either side, if they happen to give trouble gas struts are relatively easy to find in any moderately sized African city. I have had no trouble from mine in eight years now and do not know of problems for others. The Bundutop apparently has a more complicated electrically controlled raising system for its pop-up roof, although it has a mechanical over-ride, sounds more complicated to me for remote usage and problems have been reported.

    The size of the Alucab tent inside is fine, it has a great, firm mattress which we were very comfortable sleeping upon. Because of the clamshell shape when opened, the one ceiling is far lower than the other, My wife prefers sleeping with her head on the lower side which suites well. There are electrical leads to two reading lights on either side of the tent. The inside of the ceiling is quilted to prevent condensation of liquid inside of the tent ceiling in the frequent humid conditions, dripping inside a tent can drive you to distraction!

    There is a large zip-up netting plus canvass flap at the back and then again exactly the same on either side, 3 in all. Thus the ladder mount to the tent casing and the tent entrance can either be in the rear or on the sides, depending on the camping set up, preference, weather and locality. I have ladder attachments opposite all 3 potential entranced just in case. Only the rear entrance flap has a awning to raise for shade or protection against rain. The canvass flaps are inside the tent, but both the inner canvass flaps and the outer good quality mosquito netting, have those double-sided zips, so the flaps can be zipped up from inside or outside.

    This tent is very robust with its aluminum plate roof and boxed sides and if the opened end of the clamshell is faced away from a gale by moving the vehicle, it will withstand all but the most extreme winds. You can close the tent and travel with your bedding, pillows and other contents, within the closed tent. Our tent has never leaked either open or closed, in fairly extreme African downpours.

    The Alucab's biggest advantages is the simplicity and rapidity of deployment, its sturdiness, comfort and standard of manufacture. I would just advise lubricating all zips with graphite powder (locksmiths) or candle wax, so they run smoothly. Do not use oily lubricants, they attract African dust.

    Many ways of skinning a cat!
    Quote Originally Posted by PierredW View Post
    We own a Hannibal Impi which is made of fibreglass and it is on the canopy of my 79 Land Cruiser p/u. No issues but the shape and size is very similar to the Alucab. It is good into the wind
    either when driving or if turned with the lower side towards the wind when camping. We however find it very warm with 2 smaller windows at the side and the rear one with a fly sheet over it.

    The Bundutop with 4 large windows will be cooler and the fibreglass reinforced mosquito net is also far less restrictive than the shade net type of the Alucab, Hannibal and others. I started to
    look at Bundutop, either in 1.35 x 2.1 or 1.6 x 2.1. The other tent I like a lot is the Easy Awn Stealth. It is build like the Alucab but with a scissor mechanism at the lower end to allow for some
    clearance. The traditional fold open/close Easy Awn on my Colt is very well made so I have a lot respect for their quality.

    https://eezi-awn.com/product/stealth/
    Thanks Stan and Pierre for your input. Of course what you have had to say has me thinking about what the better option is for our travels. I’ve spent the last day looking at the many options South African manufacturers have to offer; Bundutop, Alucab, Hannibal Impi, Quickpitch, Customleisuretech etc. Whilst not an ASPW fan I enjoyed ASPW’s review of Alucab although some of his subsequent “comments” were not as flattering, he also highly rated Quickpitch. There are so many options out there, as Stan says “many ways to skinning a cat”. Narrowing choice to Alucab vs Bundutop, main points to ponder for me are;

    · Alucab can carry 50kgs on roof, Bundutop only 25kgs. Important as if possible I would like to carry my spare wheel on top of the RTT plus a solar panel, I see this has been successful by existing Alucab owner.
    · Different configuration shapes have pros and cons, Alucab better in strong wind (face vehicle into wind), Bundutop better when less windy (four windows allows through breeze all directions).
    · Whilst I think both options are horrendously priced Bundutop is cheaper at R35k vs Alucab at R40k (currently on special, but unlikely to be when we buy at end of year). However these prices are far cheaper than Australia at R64k and R65k respectively.
    · Alucab clearly wins the prize in simplicity if anything were to go wrong on the way to Kigoma (or any other East African destination). If anything goes wrong with dual battery you may not even be able to raise the Bundutop.
    · According to points raised elsewhere Alucab (4x4Megaworld) appear to push you into buying their fittings for the Alucab mounting. I don’t fully understand this point, I hope one can do this on his own, certainly an Australian Alucab mounting on YouTube made it seem relatively simple.
    · I did not like the twin “reading” lights in earlier Alucab models, fortunately I see these have been replaced by a light in the roof on later models.
    · The Bundutop certainly appears more “roomy” than the A frame type setup of the Alucab.
    · Many users appear to have changed the mattress in the Alucab at 75mm thick, it seems you are in the minority on your views here Stan. The 100mm Bundutop mattress seems to be more popular with users, maybe still requires an upgrade.

    We certainly won’t be making a purchase before we have South African air tickets in our hands, too many unknowns around Covid. Thanks again for providing food for thought. Decisions, decisions, decisions ……………………….
    John 2014 Toyota Hilux 4x4 3.0 D4D
    Baobab BL1715 "Kamba"
    "I never knew of a morning in Africa when I woke up and was not happy" - Ernest Hemingway

    Kgalagadi 2019 Namibia 2019 Gonarezhou 2019 Mana/Tafika 2018 Kgalagadi 2017 Lion, Hippo, Eland Leguaan, Python

  28. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Midrand
    Posts
    612
    Thanked: 1612

    Default Re: Comments on Bundutop rooftop tent on a 2003 Prado VX

    I think this is a great analysis.

    Couple points from my experience with the bundutop:

    - Depending on your roof rack length, you can offset the bundutop forward (or rearward). On mine, it’s far enough forward to leave enough rack at the back for a second spare and some other space. I carry the second spare rimless due to weight, especially that high up.

    - They supply a widget for lack of a better word that allows you to bypass the switches and safety relays in case of failure - you can connect it to a small 7 ah battery if you want as a backup - this supplies power directly to the winch. Totally agree there is more that can fail here - but they do provide some solutions. The top is not heavy, and in the event of total failure could definitely be lifted into position and rigged up. Dropping it requires nothing but gravity.

    - it has a single light in the center.

    - There is some backlog - about a month - just FYI.

    - we did add a topper to the mattress- I’m not a firm bed fan. If you don’t do that you can also store ladder inside. With a topper, the ladder has to store externally.
    Last edited by heyyahhey; 2021/01/26 at 06:03 AM.

  29. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to heyyahhey For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •