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  1. #1
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    Default Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Ever since my dad learned how to do it from an Iranian (Brain Seady from Port Elizabeths dad) about 15 or so years ago we have swithed from baking Pot bread or roosterkoek to making Pita Bread. You kneed normal bread dough , let it rise for about 30 min , roll it out and in just over 2 minutes on the fire you are done.

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    Last edited by Bex; 2021/01/17 at 07:36 AM.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Seems quite similar to "Roosterkoek"?
    Ettienne de Kock

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Pitta bread risers and is able to be opened like a envelope, dont know rooster Koek.. How do they work?

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bex View Post
    Ever since my dad learned how to do it from an Iranian (Brain Seady from Port Elizabeths dad) about 15 or so years ago we have swithed from baking Pot bread or roosterkoek to making Pita Bread. You kneed normal bread dough , let it rise for about 30 min , roll it out and in just over 2 minutes on the fire you are done.

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    Please share your recipe
    "If you don't care where you are, you ain't lost"

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by Spook View Post
    Please share your recipe
    Go to spar or PnP and buy fat koek dough, let that rise etc and use it. I buy the dough and mix cheese etc into the bought dough then toss into my flat pot on the fire. Kids think I'm a hero when baking pot bread
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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Roosterkoek is a much slower process and is done over low heat turning frequently.

    Ill get the recipy from my wife, but most bread dough recipys will work, the important things are rolling it out flat and a very hot fire.
    Oh and dont walk away from it , it goes quickly.

    The pot also works, and I did it on a hot rock and even a "blikbord" on rowing trips, but over the coals is quick and easy, I did 24 pita bread in 8 minutes there.

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  11. #7
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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dudleytheplumber View Post
    Pitta bread risers and is able to be opened like a envelope, dont know rooster Koek.. How do they work?
    What Jors said.
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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Lyk lekker!

    *

    Please don't use the Vetkoekdeeg from the shop. They put too much yeast.

    Knie jou eie deeg. Dit is maklik.
    Kobus

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Who's Jors?
    Quote Originally Posted by EttiennedK View Post
    What Jors said.

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    OK found him he was hiding under BEX

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Still don't know how to eat the Koek, Jors only said how too cook the koek

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dudleytheplumber View Post
    Still don't know how to eat the Koek, Jors only said how too cook the koek
    You can eat it exactly like the pita bread or if you'd allowed it to rise again after kneeding it down, you can cut/break it open as with a roll or a vetkoek.

    (Edit: Loved the "cook the koek" - you had me laughing out load!!)
    Last edited by EttiennedK; 2021/01/17 at 02:50 PM.
    Ettienne de Kock

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Pita come from the Egyptians and Lebanese. Here is how to do it. I never did it on an open fire but will do it

    Ingredients

    • 1 cup

    warm water (not hot or boiling)

    • 2 teaspoons

    active dry or instant yeast

    • 2 1/2 to 3 cups

    all-purpose flour

    • 2 teaspoons

    salt

    • 1 to 2 teaspoons

    olive oil (optional)
    Instructions

    1. Form the Pita Dough: Mix the water and yeast together, and let sit for about five minutes until the yeast is dissolved. Add 2 1/2 cups of the flour (saving the last half cup for kneading), salt, and olive oil (if using). Stir until a shaggy dough is formed.
    2. Knead the Dough: Sprinkle a little of the extra flour onto your clean work surface and turn out the dough. Knead the dough for about 5-7 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. Add more flour as needed to keep the dough from sticking to your hands or the work surface, but try to be sparing. It's better to use too little flour than too much. If you get tired, stop and let the dough rest for a few minutes before finishing kneading.
    3. Let the Dough Rise: Clean the bowl you used to mix the dough and film it with a little olive oil. Set the dough in the bowl and turn it until it's coated with oil. Cover with a clean dishcloth or plastic wrap and let the dough rise until it's doubled in bulk, 1-2 hours.

    At this point, you can refrigerate the pita dough until it is needed. You can also bake one or two pitas at a time, saving the rest of the dough in the fridge. The dough will keep refrigerated for about a week.

    1. Divide the Pitas: Gently deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces and gently flatten each piece into a thick disk. Sprinkle the pieces with a little more flour and then cover them with a kitchen towel or plastic wrap wrap until you're ready to bake them.
    2. Shape the Pitas: Using a floured rolling pin, roll one of the pieces into a circle 8-9 inches wide and about a quarter inch thick. Lift and turn the dough frequently as you roll to make sure the dough isn't sticking to your counter. Sprinkle with a little extra flour if its starting to stick. If the dough starts to spring back, set it aside to rest for a few minutes, then continue rolling. Repeat with the other pieces of dough. (Once you get into a rhythm, you can be cooking one pita while rolling the next one out.)
    3. To Bake Pitas in the Oven: While shaping the pitas, heat the oven to 450. If you have a baking stone, put it in the oven to heat. If you don't have a baking stone, place a large baking sheet on the middle rack to heat.

    Place the rolled-out pitas directly on the baking stone or baking sheets (as many as will fit), and bake for about 3 minutes. I've found it easiest to carry the pita flat on the palm of my hand and then flip it over onto the baking stone. The pita will start to puff up after a minute or two and is done when it has fully ballooned. Cover baked pitas with a clean dishtowel while cooking any remaining pitas.

    1. To Bake Pitas on the Stovetop: Warm a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat until a few bead of water sizzle immediately on contact. Drizzle a little oil in the pan and wipe off the excess.

    Lay a rolled-out pita on the skillet and bake for 30 seconds, until you see bubbles starting to form. Flip and cook for 1-2 minutes on the other side, until large toasted spots appear on the underside. Flip again and cook another 1-2 minutes to toast the other side. The pita should start to puff up during this time; if it doesn't or if only small pockets form, try pressing the surface of the pita gently with a clean towel. Keep cooked pitas covered with a clean dishtowel while cooking any remaining pitas.

    1. Storing the Pitas: Pitas are best when eaten immediately after cooking. Leftover pitas will keep in an airtight bag for several days and can be eaten as they are or warmed in a toaster oven. Baked pitas can also be frozen with wax paper between the layers for up to three months.

    Pitas That Won't Puff: Sometimes you get pitas that won't puff. The problem is usually that the oven or the skillet aren't hot enough. Make sure both are thoroughly pre-heated before cooking. Even pitas that don't puff are still delicious and can be used wraps or torn into pieces for dipping in hummus.


    • Egypsian bread (pita)
    • 1

    tablespoon instant yeast

    • 1 12

    cups water

    • 1 -2

    teaspoon sugar

    • 3

    cups flour

    • 1

    tablespoon nonfat dry milk powder

    • 12

    teaspoon salt

    • 6

    tablespoons oil

    Knead dough briefly, divide into 18 egg sized balls.
    Place on a floured surface, cover and let rest for 15-30 minutes.
    Roll one ball out and cook in a skillet until large "bubbles" form.
    Flip pita over and cook the other side for a few more minutes.
    I flatten it out with a spatula.
    Keep bread warm (wrap in a towel or place in a ziploc bag) while cooking the rest of the bread.
    These freeze well.


    On the fire
    Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead two or three times to remove any air bubbles. Form into a log and divide it evenly into 10 pieces. Form each piece into a ball and then roll into disks about 1/4 inch thick and 6 inches in diameter. Lightly oil two rimmed baking sheets. Put the disks on the baking sheets, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise until just doubled in thickness, 30 to 45 minutes.
    Prepare a medium-high gas grill fire, leaving one burner off, or prepare a charcoal fire with a hot zone and cool zone by pushing the coals to one side of the grill.
    Brush a cast-iron griddle or skillet lightly with olive oil and put it on the grill over the cool zone. When very hot, cook the pitas in batches on the griddle until starting to brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and continue cooking until lightly golden on the bottom and the pitas are cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes more. Cool on a wire rack. If stuffing, cut the pitas in half and carefully separate the layers with a fork.
    Last edited by bertus; 2021/01/17 at 03:08 PM.

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  20. #14
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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Flat bread - 3 tablespoons plain yogurt, 3 tablespoons self raising flour, salt, pepper

    Mix, flatten & dry fry in a MED pan.....

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryFrank View Post
    Flat bread - 3 tablespoons plain yogurt, 3 tablespoons self raising flour, salt, pepper

    Mix, flatten & dry fry in a MED pan.....
    Now I wonder where you learnt that....
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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    So how do you get them to be "hollow/separate" in the middle?
    Everything I've read on this thread seems to be basically flat bread.
    Isn't pita supposed to be easy to open?

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by ralton View Post
    So how do you get them to be "hollow/separate" in the middle?
    Everything I've read on this thread seems to be basically flat bread.
    Isn't pita supposed to be easy to open?
    The video in the first post shows and explains it. If the heat is enough the build up steam inside and the steam inflates them like a balloon.

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    Default Re: Does anyone else bake pita bread?

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryFrank View Post
    Flat bread - 3 tablespoons plain yogurt, 3 tablespoons self raising flour, salt, pepper

    Mix, flatten & dry fry in a MED pan.....
    Try it with a lid on the pan.

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