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  1. #1
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    Default Why a "high lift jack"

    I had one when I had the Defender. After changing the suspension to a better one, there was no way in hell that I could lift that thing high enough with the high lift jack to get a wheel of the ground. The same with my Patrol...

    Now my question to those with these things strapped to your 4be, is:
    Have you tested it to see if you can actually jack the wheel off of the ground?
    Do you know that you need high lift jacking points to use them? (For those who have them strapped to the bakkie/Landie/Jimny with no points available)
    Do you know that those nice high lift jacking points on your newly installed bumper are too high to be of any effect?

    In my opinion, they have become redundant, and a bottle jack, and block of wood, are better options
    _______________________________________
    Andrew van Staden
    With a mild case of "Camping Personality Disorder" or CPD

    I drive a five cylinder bakkie and tow an army inspired van.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Terrible things.
    I also used one when I had my landy. being a landy it was often being jacked up for some or other repairs. I scratched it badly twice when the jack shifted as I was lowering it - literally nothing I could do but just carry on lowering it and watching the top of the jack scrape the paint off.
    And my worst one was when it slowly started falling sideways, but I caught it before it landed on the garage wall which would have resulted in big damage
    Graham Robertson
    Nissan Patrol 4.8
    Nissan Patrol 3.0 CRD

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hedgehog View Post
    I had one when I had the Defender. After changing the suspension to a better one, there was no way in hell that I could lift that thing high enough with the high lift jack to get a wheel of the ground. The same with my Patrol...

    Now my question to those with these things strapped to your 4be, is:
    Have you tested it to see if you can actually jack the wheel off of the ground?
    Do you know that you need high lift jacking points to use them? (For those who have them strapped to the bakkie/Landie/Jimny with no points available)
    Do you know that those nice high lift jacking points on your newly installed bumper are too high to be of any effect?

    In my opinion, they have become redundant, and a bottle jack, and block of wood, are better options
    You are 100 % right.
    I carry one but it is mainly for recovery but not for changing a wheel.

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  6. #4
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    I had one once. It was stolen at some stage, that's how much I used it.

    A decent bottle jack with a block of wood, or as I did with the CSW: just pack the trolley jack in the drawer.
    Jakes Louw
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  7. #5
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hylton View Post
    You are 100 % right.
    I carry one but it is mainly for recovery but not for changing a wheel.

    Do you lift the wheel with the jack in a recovery using a wheel strap? Because that is the only way it could be effective..
    _______________________________________
    Andrew van Staden
    With a mild case of "Camping Personality Disorder" or CPD

    I drive a five cylinder bakkie and tow an army inspired van.

  8. #6
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    They are very useful if know and respect them, and not just for just jacking up your 4x4, helped me get my T-Case out
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    1995 300TDi Defender with VGT Turbo (stolen by my son now )
    2002 Defender with LS1 MS3 ECU, 4L80e, LT230 1.222, Lockers and HD CW&P, 35" with 4" Lift
    2005 Defender TD5

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  10. #7
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    It wouldnt work on my front end, the H has torsion suspension and those wishbones just keep the wheels on the ground. It might work on the rear (cart springs) but I dont see the need. I would fall into the bottle jack camp
    Last edited by Estee; 2020/11/23 at 02:15 PM.
    Estee = S T = Sean Towlson

    Total 4x4 Novice with no experience whats-so-ever

    ''Nothing makes the Earth seem so spacious as to have friends at a distance; they make the latitudes and longitudes''. H.D. Thoreau.

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  11. #8
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hedgehog View Post
    Do you lift the wheel with the jack in a recovery using a wheel strap? Because that is the only way it could be effective..
    I have a strap I secure to Shassis and round diff axle back to shassis that way not lifting the suspension
    1995 300TDi Defender with VGT Turbo (stolen by my son now )
    2002 Defender with LS1 MS3 ECU, 4L80e, LT230 1.222, Lockers and HD CW&P, 35" with 4" Lift
    2005 Defender TD5

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  13. #9
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    A High-lift Jack is not to work on your vehicle or used to change tyres.
    A High-lift jack is part of your recovery equipment and should be used as such
    Last edited by Shorty.; 2020/11/23 at 02:19 PM.


  14. #10
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    They are not intended for changing a flat tire

    They intended for recovery purposes :

    Lifting
    Winching
    Spreading
    Clamping

    Ie if you on a 4x4 trail and have a tire in a hole lost traction and your axel is resting on the ground then those highlift jack points sould be able to get your car lifted high enough so you can add rocks ect under the wheel


    You get diffrent lenghts of high lift jacks up to 1.5m and you can buy a wider baseplate to make it more stable or attach sabilizing legs

    You also get a attachment to attach it to a rim and lift it that way

    They have a number of usefull uses!
    Last edited by whosthejman; 2020/11/23 at 02:31 PM.
    Wolverine : 93' Range Rover Classic 3.9L EFI

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  16. #11
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Just because some people have had bad experiences with the hi lift Jack does not mean it is a bad piece of equipment, end of the day it can be used for a lot of different reasons and a very useful, I have changed tires plenty of times with out any problems,

    End of the day each person has there views and I will still carry mine and use it when ever need to
    Last edited by clivemd; 2020/11/23 at 02:36 PM.
    1995 300TDi Defender with VGT Turbo (stolen by my son now )
    2002 Defender with LS1 MS3 ECU, 4L80e, LT230 1.222, Lockers and HD CW&P, 35" with 4" Lift
    2005 Defender TD5

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  18. #12
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    I found this to be informative:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5I4gae00Ho

    And after binge watching most of the popular Aussie YT channels during the initial stages of LD, I cant recall ever seeing any of them using a Hi-Lift
    Estee = S T = Sean Towlson

    Total 4x4 Novice with no experience whats-so-ever

    ''Nothing makes the Earth seem so spacious as to have friends at a distance; they make the latitudes and longitudes''. H.D. Thoreau.

    Hummer H3 V8

    W.A.P Objectivist

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  20. #13
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    The strength of the hi-lift jack is that one can push the vehicle off the jack sideways, and thus deposit it next to the holes into which it has fallen or sunk. If a 60" hi-lift is too short to accomplish this, you have a very impressive suspension setup...

    However, with a heavy vehicle like the Patrol, you typically need at least three guys to be able to achieve the above. Even so, with the inclusion of a jack buddy and some straps, cables or chains it remains a very effective piece of equipment capable of many tasks and for less weight and space than all the other equipment you would need to accomplish the same task.

    However, it is NOT for changing wheels, and therefore needs to be supplemented by another jack (be that a bottle, trolley or air) for that purpose. Or at the very least an axle stand.
    Beat-up rat rod of a '96 Nissan Patrol that bears the evidence of many wonderful adventures (and a few stupid indiscretions).

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  22. #14
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    I have a high lift jack affixed onto the spare wheel of my camping trailer.

    When I use it, my kids are ordered to stay far away. Just have a look at the recoil if used improperly...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDVau7w-WIk
    Cheers
    Willem Greyling

    "When the wise man points at the moon, the imbecile examines the finger" - Confucius

  23. #15
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    To misquote Elizabeth Barret Browning, "How can I count the ways I love thee, O Hilift jack?"
    It is not a wheel changing tool, or a jack for lifting a vehicle so that you can work on it. It is a recovery tool, pure and simple. With the proper accessories (base plate, wheel straps, jacking points etc) it is an essential piece of kit for those of us who travel in remote areas. Try getting a bottle jack under an axle when you have sunk to your chassis in cotton mud, or lifting your vehicle out of a concealed hole when the only way to get your vehicle out is to jack it up, then push the vehicle sideways off the jack. I have pulled trees out of the road in the Mau Forest after elephants have been through, blocking my path; extricated my vehicle from a fearsome mudhole on the Uganda-DRC border; pushed my vehicle sideways off the jack to get it out of a collapsed section of road on the Nyika Plateau in Malawi; winched the vehicle sideways out of a concealed ditch in snow on the Sanetti Plateau in Ethiopia's Bale Mountains etc etc.
    Essential piece of kit for overlanding - useless piece of kit for hobbyists, and mostly stuck on vehicles for show. A Hilift jack mounted with the sliding head attached on the outside of a vehicle is an indication of someone who doesn't ever need to use it in an emergency. Ours is permanently tucked away inside the vehicle under the back seat, with the working bits protected in a canvas bag.
    Tony Weaver

    1991 Land Rover 110 Hi-Line S/W 3.5l V8 carburettor
    Cooper Discoverer STT tyres, four sleeper Echo rooftop tent
    2012 Mitsubishi Outlander.

    Previously Land Rover 1968 SII, 1969 SIIA, 1973 SIII, 1983 Toyota HiLux 2litre, 2006 Land Rover Freelander TD4 HSE.

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  25. #16
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Weaver View Post
    To misquote Elizabeth Barret Browning, "How can I count the ways I love thee, O Hilift jack?"
    It is not a wheel changing tool, or a jack for lifting a vehicle so that you can work on it. It is a recovery tool, pure and simple. With the proper accessories (base plate, wheel straps, jacking points etc) it is an essential piece of kit for those of us who travel in remote areas. Try getting a bottle jack under an axle when you have sunk to your chassis in cotton mud, or lifting your vehicle out of a concealed hole when the only way to get your vehicle out is to jack it up, then push the vehicle sideways off the jack. I have pulled trees out of the road in the Mau Forest after elephants have been through, blocking my path; extricated my vehicle from a fearsome mudhole on the Uganda-DRC border; pushed my vehicle sideways off the jack to get it out of a collapsed section of road on the Nyika Plateau in Malawi; winched the vehicle sideways out of a concealed ditch in snow on the Sanetti Plateau in Ethiopia's Bale Mountains etc etc.
    won't a decent WINCH do most of those?
    Jakes Louw
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  26. #17
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    won't a decent WINCH do most of those?
    Not if you can't access it (nose in a ditch) or if there is nothing to winch against.

    A winch won't help much either if the vehicle is beached on its axle.
    Cheers
    Willem Greyling

    "When the wise man points at the moon, the imbecile examines the finger" - Confucius

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  28. #18
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    won't a decent WINCH do most of those?
    No.
    And I don't use a winch - weighs too much.
    Tony Weaver

    1991 Land Rover 110 Hi-Line S/W 3.5l V8 carburettor
    Cooper Discoverer STT tyres, four sleeper Echo rooftop tent
    2012 Mitsubishi Outlander.

    Previously Land Rover 1968 SII, 1969 SIIA, 1973 SIII, 1983 Toyota HiLux 2litre, 2006 Land Rover Freelander TD4 HSE.

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  30. #19
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by MANDREAS View Post
    Not if you can't access it (nose in a ditch) or if there is nothing to winch against.

    A winch won't help much either if the vehicle is beached on its axle.
    If there is nothing to winch against, how will a high lift jack help?

    And a decent land anchor or even a buried tyre and a good winch will be much better than a jack.
    Jakes Louw
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  31. #20
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    Default Re: Why a "high lift jack"

    Quote Originally Posted by MANDREAS View Post
    Not if you can't access it (nose in a ditch) or if there is nothing to winch against.

    A winch won't help much either if the vehicle is beached on its axle.

    It is, used them many times when sunk in deep sand, then I learned and stopped earlier

    A winch in slow gear and snatch block doubles the pulling power and a slow recovery is much safer than the improvised use of hi-lift jack or shatch strap.

    My vehicles have hydraulic winches, very useful when towing.

    I often used a second vehicle as an anchor point if trees out of reach.
    Walter Rene Gygax
    Kalahari Safari
    ORRA Call:​ WB58 | ICASA ZRF430
    Nissan Patrol GU TB45
    | Nissan Safari GU TD42 | B'rakah 4x4 Trailer
    E34 - 535i for a bit of nostalgia
    E39 - 540i for the open roads

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