Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana





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    Default Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Sounds like the Canadians want to start fracking towards the end of this year in north eastern Namibia and western Botswana. Lots of national parks and the water feeding the Okavango Delta could be affected:

    https://www.namibian.com.na/94692/re...ango-ecosystem
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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    frackers



    but I think this will blow over. Every now and then new gas or oil is found, a big boo haa is made and they will start next week. Then never hear anything again. Let's hope so...
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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Not going to happen.
    No environmental processes have happened.
    Somebody is just trying to talk up their share price.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    1) They'll never get through the EIA successfully
    2) There's no market nearby - the infrastructure cost would be huge - I doubt that they could find investors willing to come up with the capital
    3) They have reportedly bought a 1000HP rig for the project, capable of drilling 12,000 ft and report 6000 ft of pay section, so fracturing would be at depth, and unlikely to have any impact at surface or in shallow depths. The aquifers which are of concern are at less than 1000 ft (please confirm, someone), so not a significant risk.

    I would be far more concerned by surface impact - roads, rivers, communities, dust, emissions, etc., than by fracturing per se.

    Hope this doesn't happen...

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Fracking is used as such an emotive word. Like hunting, all the bunny huggers jump at once. Like all things in life, “it depends”.

    Hunting impala is fine. Hunting black rhino maybe not so much. Right?

    We manufacture the best fracking equipment in the world, so while I’m no expert at the geology of well development I do have a passing familiarity with the industry. In the CSG fields of South Eastern Queensland you would be hard pressed to identify a well from further than 200m away. There is virtually zero surface impact. Those photos of what looks like burnt wasteland around gas wells are BS. They definitely work in the way intended though.

    There have obviously been some significant stuff ups in the past, as there would be with any developing industry.

    The biggest concern for me in that area would be water management. It currently takes enormous amounts of water to clean out a well. In ten years that will probably be very different, but at the moment it will be a logistical issue.

    Having said that I doubt they have the financials right now to get that gas to market. Unfortunately for the local community.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    My problem is the spots they want to work in are conservation areas, also near a world heritage site, also the main site's are on the banks of the Kavango river, so I cant see that going well.
    From what I see also no EIA has been done, so who knows what actual impact will be on the biodiversity etc?
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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by BruceB View Post
    Fracking is used as such an emotive word. Like hunting, all the bunny huggers jump at once. Like all things in life, “it depends”.

    Hunting impala is fine. Hunting black rhino maybe not so much. Right?

    We manufacture the best fracking equipment in the world, so while I’m no expert at the geology of well development I do have a passing familiarity with the industry. In the CSG fields of South Eastern Queensland you would be hard pressed to identify a well from further than 200m away. There is virtually zero surface impact. Those photos of what looks like burnt wasteland around gas wells are BS. They definitely work in the way intended though.

    There have obviously been some significant stuff ups in the past, as there would be with any developing industry.

    The biggest concern for me in that area would be water management. It currently takes enormous amounts of water to clean out a well. In ten years that will probably be very different, but at the moment it will be a logistical issue.

    Having said that I doubt they have the financials right now to get that gas to market. Unfortunately for the local community.
    Having any kind of oil & gas exploitation in that area is really not desirable, to put it mildly. It will put a lot of stress on the environment, even without spills or accidents the impact would be huge. And a "small" oops could endanger the supply of water to the Okavango Delta.
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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    I really get angry when I read that there is still this insane drive to prospect for oil and gas reserves. I mean, what the hell ! Don't these people see what fossil fuels are doing to the planet ? And those who invest in these suicidal (to all life on the planet) venture are as short-sighted greedy and misguided. Or perhaps they just don't give a fig about the well-being of the planet beyond their own short life-spans ?

    Which planet are they planning to move to when life becomes unbearable here ?
    Why don't they invest in research to develop alternative energy forms that will be of benefit to the long-term sustainability of the planet and it life forms. This is a question I would really like to hear their answer to.
    Perhaps they should all watch the locally made movie My Octopus Teacher and try and understand the absolute joy of interacting with other life forms, many of which are under threat from the consequences of the use of fossil fuels.

    Rant over, but REALLY !!
    Last edited by wilfwalk; 2020/09/17 at 09:46 AM.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Would be sad if this happens. I know nothing about fracking, so for me it's an emotive response, and I respect the comments by those in the industry and the 'know' here that it can be done cleanly. My concern is that this is Africa, and sure as hell corners get cut and bribes get paid, and before you know it all those safety nets and checks and balances that are supposed to keep such an operation relatively harmless to the environment are abandoned and just present on paper. Critics will say the same happens in Australia or the US (the bribes and cutting corners), but I don't think ever near the scale this happens in Africa. We know this, we see it daily and I think this is why we are always immediately opposed to such things. The track record of these things is appalling; - also the community never benefits, in fact they get displaced by masses arriving seeking basic employment where there is none.
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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by wilfwalk View Post
    I really get angry when I read that there is still this insane drive to prospect for oil and gas reserves. I mean, what the hell ! Don't these people see what fossil fuels are doing to the planet ? And those who invest in these suicidal (to all life on the planet) venture are as short-sighted greedy and misguided. Or perhaps they just don't give a fig about the well-being of the planet beyond their own short life-spans ?

    Which planet are they planning to move to when life becomes unbearable here ?
    Why don't they invest in research to develop alternative energy forms that will be of benefit to the long-term sustainability of the planet and it life forms. This is a question I would really like to hear their answer to.
    Perhaps they should all watch the locally made movie My Octopus Teacher and try and understand the absolute joy of interacting with other life forms, many of which are under threat from the consequences of the use of fossil fuels.

    Rant over, but REALLY !!
    All good and well. Nice to talk about THEY or THESE PEOPLE but they only supply the market, which is you and I. If we do not create a demand there is no need for a supply. So may I ask what you and your household is doing to reduce your dependence on fossil fuels?
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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Ouch...

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by jab2 View Post
    All good and well. Nice to talk about THEY or THESE PEOPLE but they only supply the market, which is you and I. If we do not create a demand there is no need for a supply. So may I ask what you and your household is doing to reduce your dependence on fossil fuels?
    Solar geyser installed about 15 years ago at home and at work, gas stove, A+++ fridge & washing machine, A++ dishwasher, changed from gas guzzling 3.0 v6 petrol to 2,5 D-4D using about 40 % less fuel. Maybe not perfect, but its what I can afford. And you ?

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by jab2 View Post
    All good and well. Nice to talk about THEY or THESE PEOPLE but they only supply the market, which is you and I. If we do not create a demand there is no need for a supply. So may I ask what you and your household is doing to reduce your dependence on fossil fuels?
    <br>
    <br>Solar geyser installed about 15 years ago at home and at work, gas stove, A+++ fridge / freezer & washing machine, A++ dishwasher, changed from gas guzzling 3.0 v6 petrol to 2,5 D-4D using about 40 % less fuel. Maybe not perfect, but its what I can afford.&nbsp;

    Will probably go solar in our retirement home - asap.
    Last edited by wilfwalk; 2020/09/17 at 04:02 PM.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    One of the keys to responsible O&G development is its being carried out by a responsible operator - in this case the track record of some of the principals seems OK, however history shows that companies do not operate responsibly in areas where regulation is weak. I hate to say it but Canadian companies do NOT have a good record. Some are good, others terrible.

    The other key is good regulation - Australia is good in this respect (or at least, better than most), so the regulators keep the operators on their toes. In some parts of the world regulatory agencies simply fail in their duty. It has yet to be seen how Namibia and Botswana fare in this respect. For what it's worth my sense is that Namibia will do reasonably well, and Botswana will have good intentions but their bureaucracy will let them down. However, particularly at this time, both need income, as countries, and it will be tough to resist the potential for royalties and licence fees.

    PS: "fracking" is an inappropriate term. We have been fracturing wells (i.e. "frac'ing") all over the world since the 1940s, generally in a responsible manner. The recent application of fracturing techniques to shale gas and shale oil reservoirs ("unconventional production") has been conducted responsibly by some, and very unprofessionally by many, leading to the justified animosity of the public, with respect to the irresponsible operations which have led to a lot of bad outcomes.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by wilfwalk View Post
    Solar geyser installed about 15 years ago at home and at work, gas stove, A+++ fridge & washing machine, A++ dishwasher, changed from gas guzzling 3.0 v6 petrol to 2,5 D-4D using about 40 % less fuel. Maybe not perfect, but its what I can afford. And you ?
    Have you invested your pension in alternative energy? That’s what you’re asking these guys to do.

    If you said you’d dropped the hydrocarbon guzzling 4x4 for a bicycle I’d be impressed. The rest is all window dressing. But I really really understand how you feel.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by HugoNotte View Post
    Having any kind of oil & gas exploitation in that area is really not desirable, to put it mildly. It will put a lot of stress on the environment, even without spills or accidents the impact would be huge. And a "small" oops could endanger the supply of water to the Okavango Delta.
    I was under the impression that the water in the Delta came from Angola, (which has a MASSIVE conventional oil and gas industry). Methane is natural. In fact even oil is natural.

    Look I’m a conservationist at heart, but the economic realities of our lives are such that we need hydrocarbons. Even the most ardent anti-gas supporters, (like wilfwalk with his diesel 4x4) typically have a bumper sticker announcing this fact while they sit in traffic. The inconvenient truth is that none of us are willing to give up our hydrocarbon fuelled lifestyle.

    I’m definitely not saying there shouldn’t be an EIA done. My objection is that the article uses emotive language to illicit a strong emotional response from the readers who probably have no real understanding of the actual facts.


    Quote Originally Posted by alannymarce View Post
    One of the keys to responsible O&G development is its being carried out by a responsible operator - in this case the track record of some of the principals seems OK, however history shows that companies do not operate responsibly in areas where regulation is weak. I hate to say it but Canadian companies do NOT have a good record. Some are good, others terrible.

    The other key is good regulation - Australia is good in this respect (or at least, better than most), so the regulators keep the operators on their toes. In some parts of the world regulatory agencies simply fail in their duty. It has yet to be seen how Namibia and Botswana fare in this respect. For what it's worth my sense is that Namibia will do reasonably well, and Botswana will have good intentions but their bureaucracy will let them down. However, particularly at this time, both need income, as countries, and it will be tough to resist the potential for royalties and licence fees.

    PS: "fracking" is an inappropriate term. We have been fracturing wells (i.e. "frac'ing") all over the world since the 1940s, generally in a responsible manner. The recent application of fracturing techniques to shale gas and shale oil reservoirs ("unconventional production") has been conducted responsibly by some, and very unprofessionally by many, leading to the justified animosity of the public, with respect to the irresponsible operations which have led to a lot of bad outcomes.
    ^^^^ This


    Just to add a few things:


    Above is a typical outback Queensland CSG well. In a few years time one of our rigs will rock up for eight hours and service the well. Then it will run for another few years.

    The amount of vehicle traffic is not anything like mining. The farmer gets a handsome lease fee for that well, the numbers I’ve heard are massive. When you drive through it’s obvious the towns which have O&G around from the obvious signs of money.

    Look I understand the difference between Africa and Australia, that’s why I live where I do, but O&G doesn’t = evil by default.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia &amp;amp; western Botswana

    Quote Originally Posted by BruceB View Post
    I was under the impression that the water in the Delta came from Angola, (which has a MASSIVE conventional oil and gas industry). Methane is natural. In fact even oil is natural.

    Look I’m a conservationist at heart, but the economic realities of our lives are such that we need hydrocarbons. Even the most ardent anti-gas supporters, (like wilfwalk with his diesel 4x4) typically have a bumper sticker announcing this fact while they sit in traffic. The inconvenient truth is that none of us are willing to give up our hydrocarbon fuelled lifestyle.

    I’m definitely not saying there shouldn’t be an EIA done. My objection is that the article uses emotive language to illicit a strong emotional response from the readers who probably have no real understanding of the actual facts.




    ^^^^ This


    Just to add a few things:


    Above is a typical outback Queensland CSG well. In a few years time one of our rigs will rock up for eight hours and service the well. Then it will run for another few years.

    The amount of vehicle traffic is not anything like mining. The farmer gets a handsome lease fee for that well, the numbers I’ve heard are massive. When you drive through it’s obvious the towns which have O&G around from the obvious signs of money.

    Look I understand the difference between Africa and Australia, that’s why I live where I do, but O&G doesn’t = evil by default.
    If a CSG (coal seam gas) well can operate for years without "attendance", then it is most probably not fracking.
    I have no personal experience of hydrocarbon exploration and extraction, but below is how I understand "tight" shale oil and gas and fracking.
    1) the extraction hole is drilled down to the target shale bed and then turned horisontal to run parallel and inside the shale bed.
    2) a massive (mind blowing) volume of water is injected under pressure to fracture the shale beds. For water scarce Southern Africa this is a problem. Big fleets of water tankers can and will damage roads.
    3) the water is mixed with very specialised additives of which the formula is almost always the intellectual property of that company, which means it is kept a secret. This is one of the biggest emotional aspects of fracking, people believe because it is a secret it must be evil.
    4) such a fracked hole doesn't tap into a very large area (resource), which means it won't last very long. The next, and next, and next holes have to be drilled not too far off. This is the other big problem with tight shale oil, it results in a close spaced network of drill sites and interconnecting pipe networks.
    I spent my whole working life in the mineral resource industry and had many community meetings in the process. There are normally only two types of people present: the haves who are opposed to any new development and the have-nots who want to know how many jobs will be created.
    Last edited by RoelfleRoux; 2020/09/18 at 06:26 AM.

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia & western Botswana

    See this article in the Namibian. GRN approves.

    https://www.namibian.com.na/94736/re...80%93-Alweendo

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    Default Re: Fracking in NE Namibia &amp;amp; western Botswana

    The unfortunate reality is that the communities around the fracking sites usually end up with nadda. Only the pockets of corrupt officials are lined and the big corporates are nowwhere closely interested in the fate of the communities.
    Quote Originally Posted by RoelfleRoux View Post
    If a CSG (coal seam gas) well can operate for years without "attendance", then it is most probably not fracking.
    I have no personal experience of hydrocarbon exploration and extraction, but below is how I understand "tight" shale oil and gas and fracking.
    1) the extraction hole is drilled down to the target shale bed and then turned horisontal to run parallel and inside the shale bed.
    2) a massive (mind blowing) volume of water is injected under pressure to fracture the shale beds. For water scarce Southern Africa this is a problem. Big fleets of water tankers can and will damage roads.
    3) the water is mixed with very specialised additives of which the formula is almost always the intellectual property of that company, which means it is kept a secret. This is one of the biggest emotional aspects of fracking, people believe because it is a secret it must be evil.
    4) such a fracked hole doesn't tap into a very large area (resource), which means it won't last very long. The next, and next, and next holes have to be drilled not too far off. This is the other big problem with tight shale oil, it results in a close spaced network of drill sites and interconnecting pipe networks.
    I spent my whole working life in the mineral resource industry and had many community meetings in the process. There are normally only two types of people present: the haves who are opposed to any new development and the have-nots who want to know how many jobs will be created.
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