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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    I've never seen a trolley jack higher than 200mm
    See the red compact 2 ton trolley jack in post #6? That is shown semi elevated in the pic. Retracted completely it can easily get under a 150 mm high axle tube. It has a lift height of about 300 mm+.
    Last edited by Olyfboer; 2020/08/09 at 04:28 PM.

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  3. #22
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Isn't it a bit risky changing a tyre under an unsupported hydraulic jack?

    I've seen a few that slowly lose height and I would imagine a seal could potentially fail and a sudden drop happen. Screw jacks aren't safe for day in day out use but emergency use I'd rather go with one than a hydraulic jack on its own.

    The 2 stage bottle jacks are hard to find and expensive, I looked recently and I found a as new Hyundai Tucson OE one which appears to be the factory issue jack for that vehicle.
    Last edited by Skylark; 2020/08/09 at 04:41 PM.

  4. #23
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
    Isn't it a bit risky changing a tyre under an unsupported hydraulic jack?

    I've seen a few that slowly lose height and I would imagine a seal could potentially fail and a sudden drop happen. Screw jacks aren't safe for day in day out use but emergency use I'd rather go with one than a hydraulic jack on its own.

    The 2 stage bottle jacks are hard to find and expensive, I looked recently and I found a as new Hyundai Tucson OE one which appears to be the factory issue jack for that vehicle.
    You never work under a vehicle supported only by a jack. Any jack. When changing a tyre, you're not under the vehicle.

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  6. #24
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Olyfboer View Post
    See the red compact 2 ton trolley jack in post #6? That is shown semi elevated in the pic. Retracted completely it can easily get under a 150 mm high axle tube. It has a lift height of about 300 mm+.
    RETRACTED height
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  7. #25
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    [QUOTE=jelo;4450083]RETRACTED height[/QUOTE

    Retracted height is about 100 mm or less. Extended 300 mm or more. Notice the black carry handle in the centre of the red jack? You can judge size from there.

  8. #26
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    [QUOTE=Olyfboer;4450091]
    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    RETRACTED height[/QUOTE

    Retracted height is about 100 mm or less. Extended 300 mm or more. Notice the black carry handle in the centre of the red jack? You can judge size from there.
    Exactly. So if you say a trolley jack is too high you are lying.
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  9. #27
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    [QUOTE=jelo;4450096]
    Quote Originally Posted by Olyfboer View Post
    Exactly. So if you say a trolley jack is too high you are lying.
    What are you on about? When did I ever say a trolley jack was too high?

  10. #28
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    So I had a few hydraulic jacks in my bakkie, but they always leak. I think it's cos they mounted horizontally and with all the gravel roads.

    I also have Ironman Suspension, slightly larger tyres and body lift, and I didn't want to carry a massive 10ton jack as it must fit in the standard space.

    I bought a extended 2ton mechanical jack, put it under the lower control arm etc for the wheel which needs lifting and it works great. 2 tons works fine for lifting 1 corner of the car at a time.

    Nice and small, works well if you supplement it with a hi lift. Just make sure it's the extended version.

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  12. #29
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Olyfboer View Post
    You never work under a vehicle supported only by a jack. Any jack. When changing a tyre, you're not under the vehicle.
    No sht but good luck changing a wheel without putting various body parts in the wheel well at times, I wouldn't want a car to fall or start falling whilst manoeuvring a tyre on or off. It can be especially difficult doing it alone with a heavy off road wheel. And the location where the tyre change is being done can at times not be optimal, adding further difficulty.

    Emergency jacking of a vehicle isn't always just to change the wheel, wheel bearings seize, brakes lose the plot. Sometimes the vehicle may need to be supported by the jack for hours at a time, a situation which hydraulic is not designed for.

    I see a screw jack as the most appropriate tool for the job vs hydraulic, not that hydraulic can't do it, just potentially more risky.

  13. #30
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
    No sht but good luck changing a wheel without putting various body parts in the wheel well at times, I wouldn't want a car to fall or start falling whilst manoeuvring a tyre on or off. It can be especially difficult doing it alone with a heavy off road wheel. And the location where the tyre change is being done can at times not be optimal, adding further difficulty.

    Emergency jacking of a vehicle isn't always just to change the wheel, wheel bearings seize, brakes lose the plot. Sometimes the vehicle may need to be supported by the jack for hours at a time, a situation which hydraulic is not designed for.

    I see a screw jack as the most appropriate tool for the job vs hydraulic, not that hydraulic can't do it, just potentially more risky.
    Here's a pic of one of my vehicles after changing a right rear tyre. Steel rim, 6 ply crossply and the spare off and on the bonnet plus a vehicle loaded with over 10 days of water, food, supplies, camping and overlanding gear.

    Attachment 583676

    At no time do you have to put your hands in a wheel well when changing a wheel. You cannot grip a wheel above the lower half. Especially a heavy wheel. Hydraulic trolley jacks don't suddenly fail and drop. A blown O Ring will cause it to lower slowly. You will hear it too. Just stand back if it happens. The vehicle has three more wheels on the ground that aren't going to let it go anywhere while it lowers slowly. My jack is over 20 years old and has survived thousands of km of rough road. I carry a screw and hydraulic bottle jack as well but have never used them because they and the folding axle stands are in the Landy's toolbox which is always under some camping gear. I keep the trolley jack and wheel spanner right inside the tailgate.

    If I require emergency or repair jacking, I carry two folding axle stands. Light, take up very little space and stable under an axle.

    If screw jacks are so much safer, why do all garages use trolley jacks instead?

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  15. #31
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    The standard 2ton trolley jacks is a bit of a schlep for me. I need more than 50mm board or foot plate for it to ride on to reach any significant jacking point under the axle. Also essential as a trolley jack does not run well on gravel or uneven surfaces. A 3 ton or bigger will give me reach, but it's just so much bigger. My go to jack is still my old Nissan screw type, but a 5ton bottle jack would do me well.

    I also find the little 2ton trolley jacks fairly useless. I have popped the seals on 3 of them now, which is silly considering I am never lifting more than 600kg when jacking one wheel in the front (vehicle weighs 1200kg on the front). And I never jack a diff up in the middle. My father taught me that, and I have heard of tubes bending on the little Dana 30 axles. I also don't allow the tyre swop shop to do it either.

    I must get myself one of them fold up jack stands, because my one I carry around takes up a lot of space, and I never have a way or place to secure it so that it does not become a projectile in a role over.
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  16. #32
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    I did have a 20 ton bottle jack in the Land Rover and a wooden block for if you is in sand. The Land Rover had a 5 inch body lift. Just remember the jack must always stay upright.

  17. #33
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Olyfboer View Post
    Here's a pic of one of my vehicles after changing a right rear tyre. Steel rim, 6 ply crossply and the spare off and on the bonnet plus a vehicle loaded with over 10 days of water, food, supplies, camping and overlanding gear.

    Attachment 583676

    At no time do you have to put your hands in a wheel well when changing a wheel. You cannot grip a wheel above the lower half. Especially a heavy wheel. Hydraulic trolley jacks don't suddenly fail and drop. A blown O Ring will cause it to lower slowly. You will hear it too. Just stand back if it happens. The vehicle has three more wheels on the ground that aren't going to let it go anywhere while it lowers slowly. My jack is over 20 years old and has survived thousands of km of rough road. I carry a screw and hydraulic bottle jack as well but have never used them because they and the folding axle stands are in the Landy's toolbox which is always under some camping gear. I keep the trolley jack and wheel spanner right inside the tailgate.

    If I require emergency or repair jacking, I carry two folding axle stands. Light, take up very little space and stable under an axle.

    If screw jacks are so much safer, why do all garages use trolley jacks instead?
    You clearly didn't read what I posted in your hurry to pat yourself on the back.

    As an emergency jacking device, especially if it's all you have, I see a screw jack as a more appropriate tool.

    Hydraulic is certainly the more efficient lifting device and probably cheaper to manufacturer for the heavy duty cycle application in a garage but used as an unsupported vehicle stand as a spare wheel jack is I personally would choose a screw jack.

    When my trolley jack failed I didn't hear anything it just dropped, relatively slowly but it was still an eerie experience, fortunately the jack stand was already in place so it caught the vehicle but it still made me think about what could have happened.

    If you are going to bring half your workshop and jack stands along for the ride then yes obviously use whatever jack you please.

    If you aren't putting your hands into the wheel well or to be more precise under the wheel well at any stage when changing a wheel then you have some very special skills.

    Changing a heavy wheel after a long hard day, drained and tired, stressed, overheated, parked in a difficult location you sometimes have to man handle that tyre off and on, you would definitely be exposed to injury if the vehicle dropped at that point, even slowly things can happen all to quickly.

  18. #34
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
    No sht but good luck changing a wheel without putting various body parts in the wheel well at times, I wouldn't want a car to fall or start falling whilst manoeuvring a tyre on or off. It can be especially difficult doing it alone with a heavy off road wheel. And the location where the tyre change is being done can at times not be optimal, adding further difficulty.

    Emergency jacking of a vehicle isn't always just to change the wheel, wheel bearings seize, brakes lose the plot. Sometimes the vehicle may need to be supported by the jack for hours at a time, a situation which hydraulic is not designed for.

    I see a screw jack as the most appropriate tool for the job vs hydraulic, not that hydraulic can't do it, just potentially more risky.
    Nothing wrong with the hydraulic jacks - car manufacturers would not include them as car jacks if they would not, and garages would not use them in bottle or trolley format. I bought my little 2t trolley jack in 1982, and it still does not drop. The other bigger trolley jack and 2 bottle jacks, are also still fine - they are 20-25 years old. I carried a small 2T cheapy from Adendorffs for many years in my Defender, upright, to compliment my HiLift jack, and that never leaked either, and was still working fine when I sold it.

    I had to change seals on one bottle jack which I inherited when I bought my Disco. It was stored on it's side. But, it was one of the cheap Midas type ones.

    You are right in that a vehicle stand should be used ideally in all situations when jacking up a vehicle. But, I have never seen this being done, ever, when a wheel was changed. I have never done this either. Nor have I had the need to place any of my body parts into the falling danger zone when doing this, even on my camper with big oversized tyres.
    Mike Lauterbach

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  20. #35
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Just stick the spare under the car while removing wheel, at least if the worst happens it will land on the spare rim.
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  22. #36
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Last year on the Wild Cost 4x4 Eco Route a heavy laden Hilux D-4D cut a tire down in a ditch. This Hilux had a suspension lift and had slightly bigger tires than standard.

    Try the High lift jack from a Landy in the party, but no go as the megenism were stuck.

    Right then another guy offered an airjack. Could not get it to inflate.

    Out came the standard Hilux mechanical bottle jack which did the job quickly and efficiently. No problem.

    Just saying.

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  24. #37
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Placing a jack stand under an axle, a common place, is in itself dangerous, although it can be pushed or slid there on hard paving.

    Off road and on a track? Not sure.

    I use a Toyota screw jack if I can. Easy, but then do not try to get under vehicle.

    Sometimes drive up ramps at home and then place stands and the hi lift.

    I also have hi lift buddy for rescue but never used at home.

    When changing wheels or looking at brakes, have to take care not to risk head or shoulders in wheel well, must be risky if jack fails or slips. The head is not big and flat or cupped, like a trolley jack. Just think and go slow IMO.

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  26. #38
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by ed rouillard View Post
    Placing a jack stand under an axle, a common place, is in itself dangerous, although it can be pushed or slid there on hard paving.

    Off road and on a track? Not sure.

    I use a Toyota screw jack if I can. Easy, but then do not try to get under vehicle.

    Sometimes drive up ramps at home and then place stands and the hi lift.

    I also have hi lift buddy for rescue but never used at home.

    When changing wheels or looking at brakes, have to take care not to risk head or shoulders in wheel well, must be risky if jack fails or slips. The head is not big and flat or cupped, like a trolley jack. Just think and go slow IMO.
    ^^^ That

    Still need to weld a cup or V to the top of my bottle jacks.
    Mike Lauterbach

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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    All very well, but I need a lifting device to get the 285:75:16 spare wheel off the mounting bracket on the rear LUB door on the cruiser.
    I can't see the Swambo & me doing this and replacing the flat one in our 60's very easily!
    I was thinking of designing a fitting for the high-lift jack to do this.
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    Default Re: Which tyre jack.

    Quote Originally Posted by steamer View Post
    All very well, but I need a lifting device to get the 285:75:16 spare wheel off the mounting bracket on the rear LUB door on the cruiser.
    I can't see the Swambo & me doing this and replacing the flat one in our 60's very easily!
    I was thinking of designing a fitting for the high-lift jack to do this.
    If you have a roofrack, build a hinged lifting arm with a boat winch.
    Mike Lauterbach

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