Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.





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  1. #1
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    Default Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    My mate bought a very beat up southbend 9 lathe. We are going to try get it running again.
    The lathe has many problems. We have had to weld the lathe spindle up and get the gear on the end of the spindle recut and recut a new gear on the end of the headstock spindle.

    We areb going to try run it on a vfd. But the countershaft was so badly worn so we had to linebore it. This is my first attempt at it . The setup felt like twelve hours and was immensely painful and the machining took only twelve minutes.I never got the greatest finish because the setup is cutting through a keyway in the casting and there is just too much resonance and harmonic buildup. Okay and the fact that i dont know what Im doing. But it trued things up and I made some vesconite bushings for this shaft. Vesconite is nice stuff.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmuOiViYawM
    Last edited by plunger; 2020/07/07 at 10:33 PM.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Nice Emco lathe you got there!

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
    Nice Emco lathe you got there!
    Yes shes my baby.The countershaft came out real nice.I made a pulley from some plastic as we had no aluminum. I hope its not too slippery. We are planning to use a old cambelt upside down.I never had a dedicated 6mm broach so I cheated and used my lathe and a
    5mm cutter and just wiggled it up and down to make the keyway.
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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    In the last pic I was hoping to ask one of the machinests if this would work in a lathe. I never had the broach bush for a nineteen mm hole . I wonder why I could not just put the broach in the toolpost and use it as one would with a single tooth cutter. It would save making the bush as well as having to grind a 6mm broach cutter..
    Last edited by plunger; 2020/07/08 at 07:50 AM.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    I think the teeth step up too quickly, and thus the forces are probably too high to use a broach in a lathe. However, it might work for soft materials.
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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Connan View Post
    I think the teeth step up too quickly, and thus the forces are probably too high to use a broach in a lathe. However, it might work for soft materials.
    I think you are right . It would have worked in this application but maybe to much spring in metal.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I think you are right . It would have worked in this application but maybe to much spring in metal.
    You can use it in a bearing press if you can mount the broach cutter onto the press's ram. This is actually the way it was done in the olden days. You have a lot of pressure that can do a lot of work in cutting a slot quickly.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    You can use it in a bearing press if you can mount the broach cutter onto the press's ram. This is actually the way it was done in the olden days. You have a lot of pressure that can do a lot of work in cutting a slot quickly.
    Yes but it needs a dedicated 19 mm slotted bush.And if your hole was 20mm you need a 20mm slotted bush. I was too lazy to machine one so thats why I was tempted to just put the broach in the toolpost and use the lathe as a shaper with the broach.Cutting a keyway in a lathe is a tedious process and thats where a shaper shines. I have actually made a dedicated keyway cutter from the topslide using a set of levers.
    I take the leadscrew out of the topslide and use the topslide for keyway cutting. I cringe using the carriage wheel to cut keyways because its hard on the lathe.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Today I tried finishing the broken pulley. Its bust in a few places and a chunk was missing. I ground a piece of mild steel to fit in place of the lost piece.

    Now this was a good learning curve and I messed up . But I will be cleverer next time. I last brazed about twenty years ago. I brazed this in place in the vertical position. I am not sure of the required gap so assumed tight as possible. What I should have done which is obvious is to chamfer the pulley and the filler piece.
    Next time Im going to tack tig the filler piece in place making sure its well chamfered. Them I m going to lay it flat so gravity is on my side. Now the piece cant fall out cause its tacked and if it is layed flat on a big chunk of steel (acting as a heat sink)then the stuff wont fall off the whole time.
    Well you only learn from mistakes.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by plunger; 2020/07/12 at 07:05 PM.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Brilliant fix. I had to really zoom In to even notice where you fixed it

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiaan Pot View Post
    Brilliant fix. I had to really zoom In to even notice where you fixed it
    I never thought cast pulleys could be brazed.
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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    I picked up a 1940 48 Atlas lathe at the scrappy for R500.00.....

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryFrank View Post
    I picked up a 1940 48 Atlas lathe at the scrappy for R500.00.....
    Thats mos daylight robbery.
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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Ja I never get a luck with stuff like that, .Im still waiting for Karma to reward me for my exceptionally good behaviour.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Ja I never get a luck with stuff like that, .Im still waiting for Karma to reward me for my exceptionally good behaviour.
    When you least expect it, it happens so keep on waiting in anticipation!

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Today I tried finishing the broken pulley. Its bust in a few places and a chunk was missing. I ground a piece of mild steel to fit in place of the lost piece.

    Now this was a good learning curve and I messed up . But I will be cleverer next time. I last brazed about twenty years ago. I brazed this in place in the vertical position. I am not sure of the required gap so assumed tight as possible. What I should have done which is obvious is to chamfer the pulley and the filler piece.
    Next time Im going to tack tig the filler piece in place making sure its well chamfered. Them I m going to lay it flat so gravity is on my side. Now the piece cant fall out cause its tacked and if it is layed flat on a big chunk of steel (acting as a heat sink)then the stuff wont fall off the whole time.
    Well you only learn from mistakes.
    Good job! Chamfered edges, well heated metal before brazing and the brazing metal will simply flow into the chamfer cavity when it is laying on its side and gravity is you friend.

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    Default Re: Fixing a southbend lathe from the late thirtys.

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Today I tried finishing the broken pulley. Its bust in a few places and a chunk was missing. I ground a piece of mild steel to fit in place of the lost piece.

    Now this was a good learning curve and I messed up . But I will be cleverer next time. I last brazed about twenty years ago. I brazed this in place in the vertical position. I am not sure of the required gap so assumed tight as possible. What I should have done which is obvious is to chamfer the pulley and the filler piece.
    Next time Im going to tack tig the filler piece in place making sure its well chamfered. Them I m going to lay it flat so gravity is on my side. Now the piece cant fall out cause its tacked and if it is layed flat on a big chunk of steel (acting as a heat sink)then the stuff wont fall off the whole time.
    Well you only learn from mistakes.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Good job! Chamfered edges, well heated metal before brazing and the brazing metal will simply flow into the chamfer cavity when it is laying on its side and gravity is you friend.
    Cheers,
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