Defender Rain water as coolant. - Page 2





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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Whatever. Use it or don't use it



  2. #22
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    I use a quality antifreeze with normal tap water.

    My owned previous landy 13 years and the coolant was charged regularly and never did I have any sign of scale or corrosion.

    My current landy gets a coolant change every 4 years and it looks still brand new.

    Don't over complicate it. If your water is of good quality then it's good for your car.
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  3. #23
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    I guarantee you most workshops and agents prob only use tap water with antifreeze
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  5. #24
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Its with 50 50 Anti Freeze with borehole water as the base water. Tap water seemed to have no effect in the early days. We put all our radiator destined water through an RO filter now which seems to have eliminated the problem. The source of water is something one wouldn't ordinarily consider as it still comes from a tap.
    Quote Originally Posted by James Stevenson View Post
    There has been an increase in lost engines in Zim with the use of borehole water in radiators.

    Holes form in wet sleeves and internal corrosion elsewhere. An increase in electrolysis due to the minerals in the water has been muted.

    We've noticed along with this that Ph levels play their part in the corrosion of aluminium and copper components.

    It's akin to cancer, engine cancer as the effects are all internal and unseen until failure occurs.

    Just putting it out there.

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  7. #25
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eTouareg View Post
    Water is not a good coolant.
    Use proper coolant.
    To dilute it to the correct ratio, just about any potable water will do.
    Your statement is incorrect.
    Water is a very good coolant. Antifreeze is a poor coolant.
    Water is corrosive and has poor anti freeze and lubricating properties.
    Therefore antifreeze is added to water, to lower the freezing temperature and increase the lubricating properties. If too much antifreeze is added. It lowers the cooling properties of the water.
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  9. #26
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pieterk View Post
    Your statement is incorrect.
    Water is a very good coolant. Antifreeze is a poor coolant.
    Water is corrosive and has poor anti freeze and lubricating properties.
    Therefore antifreeze is added to water, to lower the freezing temperature and increase the lubricating properties. If too much antifreeze is added. It lowers the cooling properties of the water
    If water was a good coolant, they would not have to add anti-freeze and anti-corrosive additives to it.....

    ..... to make it a good engine coolant.

    Engine coolant needs to
    .
    • Transfer heat
    • Lubricate
    • Prevent corrosion.


    Water has only one of those attributes
    Last edited by 4eTouareg; 2020/05/31 at 03:44 PM.
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  10. #27
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZuluCowboy View Post
    Put the dam water in, will do nothing, one or two litres of water will hardly contain enough of anything to cause a problem, how long does it take a kettle to scale up after boiling thousands of litres.
    Except if you stay in the Northern Cape. High lime and mineral content scale up stuff in no time. Have seen many Aluminium heads, water pump casing and all stuff in contact with coolant eaten away. Not only by the lag of anti freeze but by using wrong spec anti freeze. Safest is to use what the engine manufacturer prescribe for the specific engine.

    The only 4.5efi engine I ever saw failed were run on the wrong anti freeze. Alu head eaten away that led to a blown top gasket.

    In the end not worth saving a few cents on cheap solutions.
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  11. #28
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Thanks to those who mentioned the bad borehole water with lots of metals in. I grew up in a remote area and used mostly rain water. I will agree there was less acid than today. Which colour or anti freeze can be used in most modern engines.

  12. #29
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by ekkekan View Post
    Thanks to those who mentioned the bad borehole water with lots of metals in. I grew up in a remote area and used mostly rain water. I will agree there was less acid than today. Which colour or anti freeze can be used in most modern engines.
    Colors is maybe another thread that needs to be debated on but here is a start to that discussion.

    https://tap.fremontmotors.com/truste...-types-coolant
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  13. #30
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by clivemd View Post
    I guarantee you most workshops and agents prob only use tap water with antifreeze
    Correct, and the same for vehicle manufactures.
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  14. #31
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pieterk View Post
    Your statement is incorrect.
    Water is a very good coolant. Antifreeze is a poor coolant.
    Water is corrosive and has poor anti freeze and lubricating properties.
    Therefore antifreeze is added to water, to lower the freezing temperature and increase the lubricating properties. If too much antifreeze is added. It lowers the cooling properties of the water.
    Nie meer nie.

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  16. #32
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    You should most certainly not put distilled water into the cars cooling system. It is corrosive. pH is below 7. Use the proper coolant. Otherwise nothing wrong with clean rainwater.

  17. #33
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    In a situation where I had to choose between dodgy tap or borehole water and rain water, I'd use rain water.

    And having had lots of issues with cooling systems in my life because I was told to use plain water, please take my advice and run at LEAST a 30% antifreeze mix.
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  19. #34
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by clivemd View Post
    I guarantee you most workshops and agents prob only use tap water with antifreeze
    Because they are skelm, not because it's good.
    On the rigs we NEVER add water add water to the Caterpillar engines. We use Cat ELC for 6000 hours then add Cat ELC Coolant extender which enables the coolant to be used until 12000 hours after which we replace with new coolant. There is no reason to mess around, just use the right stuff and save yourself unnecessary expenses.
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  21. #35
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by rodneykdc View Post
    Because they are skelm, not because it's good.
    On the rigs we NEVER add water add water to the Caterpillar engines. We use Cat ELC for 6000 hours then add Cat ELC Coolant extender which enables the coolant to be used until 12000 hours after which we replace with new coolant. There is no reason to mess around, just use the right stuff and save yourself unnecessary expenses.
    yep

    If my water was dodge I'd fork out for the premix stuff.
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  23. #36
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by rodneykdc View Post
    Because they are skelm, not because it's good.
    On the rigs we NEVER add water add water to the Caterpillar engines. We use Cat ELC for 6000 hours then add Cat ELC Coolant extender which enables the coolant to be used until 12000 hours after which we replace with new coolant. There is no reason to mess around, just use the right stuff and save yourself unnecessary expenses.
    Yes exactly, just buy premix, like the Wurth, Total, Toyota red etc.

    You never need to touch water when a cooling system is concerned.

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  25. #37
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Does different engines nowadays all require different proportions of antifreeze and also different types of antifreeze? I have a 2010 Mercedes with < 100 000 km's and a 2001 Landcruiser VXTD with 260 000 km's. The Mercedes almost never require a drop of water but the LC after some long distance driving about 200ml or so. I always check in the bottle and only open the filler cap of the LC occasionally to make 100% sure. I started thinking about these threads and when my son had problems with overheating in his fairly new Audi A4, apparently because of a wrong coolant refill during a service. I know the answer will be that my mix proportions in the LC change minimally but it seems that it has become very important in modern engines.

  26. #38
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by rob wilson View Post
    You should most certainly not put distilled water into the cars cooling system. It is corrosive. pH is below 7. Use the proper coolant. Otherwise nothing wrong with clean rainwater.
    I didn't know this

    The PH of distilled water immediately after distillation is 7 however within hours of distillation it has absorbed carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and becomes acidic, with a PH of 5.8. This happens in about 2 hours.

    Thanks Rob

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  28. #39
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    A battery consists of two different metals (lead and a lead oxide in car batteries, zinc and carbon in dry cells etc) as electrodes, immersed in a conductive electrolyte (sulphuric acid or whatever). As it delivers electricity, one of the electrodes gets eaten away.

    Modern "water" cooled engines do NOT use water as coolant, for a good reason: they use very different metals for the various engine components (engine block, cylinder head, water pump, radiator etc) which can potentially act as electrodes. All that it needs to act as a battery is a conductive electrolyte, which water (as clean as you can get it) becomes soon after getting in contact with these electrodes. What's more, the electrodes are mostly in direct contact with each other, creating a short circuit for your "battery".

    Therefore, do NOT use water, pure or otherwise. It may be a good coolant (because of water's good heat capacity), and the "battery" it forms is not a good one (so the effects will take some time to become apparent), but in the longer term some components will be eaten away, resulting in the water pump or leaks occurring all over the place. This may take a few years to happen, but happen it will!

    Rather avoid these issues by using only a good coolant from a reputable manufacturer. My present car (a Prado V6) is now 13 years old with absolutely no cooling system problems whatsoever ... no other problems either, but that is irrelevant for this discussion. Had I used water, I am sure that there would have been problems by now ... before I made this discovery I have had many such problems (hole eaten through the thermostat housing on a Chevair, radiator core eaten away on an earlier Toyota, water pump impeller which "disappeared" on a Cortina).

    So, do learn from my experience mixed with a little bit of chemistry! Rather use your distilled water in your screen washer, mixed with a little Sunlight liquid ... but that is another story.

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  30. #40
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    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kobus P Venter View Post
    Does different engines nowadays all require different proportions of antifreeze and also different types of antifreeze? I have a 2010 Mercedes with < 100 000 km's and a 2001 Landcruiser VXTD with 260 000 km's. The Mercedes almost never require a drop of water but the LC after some long distance driving about 200ml or so. I always check in the bottle and only open the filler cap of the LC occasionally to make 100% sure. I started thinking about these threads and when my son had problems with overheating in his fairly new Audi A4, apparently because of a wrong coolant refill during a service. I know the answer will be that my mix proportions in the LC change minimally but it seems that it has become very important in modern engines.
    I have also wondered this. Some cars I have had have needed occasional top ups at the bottle , especially toyotas turbo diesel.

    Others , mostly petrol,never do.

    And I don't mean cars with a blown head or gasket or with any cooling system leaks.

    Maybe some evaporation of H2O occurs at the bottle level, since the bottle is not pressurised and the bottle cap is not hat tight? I assume the commercial premixes available still contain a certain amount of H2O?

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