Defender Rain water as coolant. - Page 4





Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4
Results 61 to 71 of 71
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    77
    Posts
    27
    Thanked: 4

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    jeeves, you wrote "I have yet to come across a vehicle which requires 100 percent coolant". My Prado requires that. I buy it from the local Toyota agent (can't remember the price, but not all that expensive). Did it last year when I replaced all the cooling system hoses as part of my preventative maintenance plan. Since then I have been to Kgalagadi and Richtersveld where, despite a combination of 45 degrees. low range, low speed and sand there was absolutely no sign of overheating.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Windhoek
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,241
    Thanked: 296

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    What about this product. Aqua Clear radiator additive for rust inhibition ?.
    They demonstrate a before and after bottle containing aqua clear with a nail in. No rust visible compared
    to a control bottle with clear water moertoe contaminated.
    I would venture that this will carry some weight to neutralize tap water.
    But!! allover they warn not to mix antifreeze products ?

    Jelo kom in ...
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by janseekat; 2020/06/02 at 07:55 AM.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Durban or Centurion
    Posts
    1,340
    Thanked: 1268

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by janseekat View Post
    What about this product. Aqua Clear radiator additive for rust inhibition ?.
    They demonstrate a before and after bottle containing aqua clear with a nail in. No rust visible compared
    to a control bottle with clear water moertoe contaminated.
    I would venture that this will carry some weight to neutralize tap water.
    But!! allover they warn not to mix antifreeze products ?

    Jelo kom in ...
    I can't comment on the aqua clear, as I have no idea what is in there. Regarding mixing of collant additives, the issues comes in when Inorganic (IAT types) is mixed with Organic (OAT types). Any (modern) car under about 20 years of age will use OAT additives.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to SAND For This Useful Post:


  5. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Warmbad
    Age
    77
    Posts
    80
    Thanked: 14

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Rain water will be better than most tap water sources PROVIDED that you apply common sense. It will be disastrous to use rain water from first downpours, especially after dry periods but after some extended rain the water will be fine.

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    De Wildt
    Age
    57
    Posts
    37,478
    Thanked: 13664

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Quote Originally Posted by SAND View Post

    Others (like Toyota) use a non-pressurized overflow bottle that is open to the environment. These tend to vent and loose some fluid over time.
    correct

    The problem here is the coolant gets pushed out of the system when hot, this means that it will have a higher propensity to evaporate. When the system cools and sucks coolant back into the system, there is in effect less volume available.

    Hence why you need to maintain the minimum level of fluid in the expansion bottle.

    Have exactly this issue with the Wrangler during a hot summer.
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to jelo For This Useful Post:


  8. #66
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Knysna
    Posts
    44
    Thanked: 17

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Coolant types can be peculiar to the vehicle make and even the model. In all cases, it is a good starting point to follow the manufacturer guidelines, although that is not as simple as it may sound.

    For the TD5 Land Rover, the specification is as follows:
    Use only ethylene glycol based anti freeze (containing no methanol) with only organic acid technology (OAT) corrosion inhibitors to protect the cooling system. Important: No other anti-freeze should be used with anti-freeze containing OAT corrosion inhibitors. Coolant solution must not fall below 50% anti-freeze otherwise damage is liable to occur. Maximum concentration is 60%.

    The manual goes on to say that the coolant capacity for the Defender TD5 is 13 liters.

    So off you go to your local motor supply where you find a product like Holts Antifreeze & Summer Coolant. It says on the 5 liter bottle that it "Protects against corrosion, Protects against freezing and retards overheating". That sounds splendid, but is it ethylene glycol based with OAT corrosion inhibitors? Some bottles are day-glow yellow, and some bottles are red? What is in it and what is the difference between the yellow and the red cooling fluid? The oke behind the counter has no idea. But there is a telephone number on the bottle. I call and someone answers - during lockdown. Not only that, but he seems to know exactly what I am talking about when I mention ethylene glycol and OAT corrosion inhibitors.

    Here is the interesting part.
    On the bottle, it says that for winter protection you should use 50% Antifreeze and 50% water. For summer, use 25% Antifreeze and 75% water - it also mentions that this 25/75 ratio is good for all year round protection.

    The agent I speak with also tells me that this product is already a 50/50 concentration and that if Land Rover specifies 50% antifreeze as they do, then I should use it UNDILUTED.

    As for the colour - no difference, just a different pigment added.

    So unless anyone out there has better guidance than the Defender Workshop Manual, or a Holts representative, I plan to use this fluid undiluted and will report back.

    Some other bits and pieces:
    Dont mix antifreeze products, depending on the composition, they can turn to a jelly like substance if mixed.

    The proper cooling of the vehicle is dependent upon the proper functioning of the cooling system and all its components, rather than the fluid alone. So don't overlook things like radiator or reservoir caps, thermostats etc.

    The main benefit of antifreeze/summer coolant products in our climate concerns the anti-foaming agents and rust inhibitors. (Apart from the obvious anti freezing properties if you live somewhere like Sutherland, that regularly is below zero degrees)

    These fluids "wear out". Replace them every 2 to 3 years.

    As for the original question, if I did need to put water in the system, I would probably buy the best distilled stuff I could find. You can never be sure what is coming from the tap or water tank.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to QuintinC For This Useful Post:


  10. #67
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    De Wildt
    Age
    57
    Posts
    37,478
    Thanked: 13664

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    And another thing to be careful of with pure water (as espoused by one of the sages earlier in the thread) that claims he has only used water and never had issues:

    ALGAE. Yes, the stuff that grows in your pool.

    Algae has many species, some of which even survive in hot water vents in volcanoes.

    Algae dies, and creates a very dense sludge.

    Glycol stops the growth of algae in your overflow tanks.
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to jelo For This Useful Post:


  12. #68
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Tshwanetoria
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,937
    Thanked: 751

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    And now all is clear as muddy water - and you can even use that in the cooling system!



  13. #69
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Somerset West
    Age
    67
    Posts
    555
    Thanked: 174

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    How is string long a piece?
    Thys de Wet
    Jimny 2009

    Ek het nou klaar gewerk, maar ek weet nie of die bank daarvan gaan hou nie...

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to dewets For This Useful Post:


  15. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Jhb East Rand
    Age
    49
    Posts
    343
    Thanked: 19

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    Thanks for bringing it to my attention!
    After some google research it seems the big problem is the water hardness which will reduce the efficiency of (and possibly clog up) your cooling system over time. I understand the comments about distilled water containing ions, but I suspect the anti-corrosives in anti-freeze would render distilled water completely safe, which is why its what is recommended on some of the bottles.
    I must admit I have always just used clean tap water, and no problems so far, but I too will start collecting rain water (which is soft because it is naturally distilled) to use in future. I use concentrated antifreeze in 1:3 ratio to make 25% concentration. I stay in Gauteng, so primarily for anti-corrosion and just a little bit of anti-freezing properties.

  16. #71
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Struisbaai
    Age
    54
    Posts
    28
    Thanked: 3

    Default Re: Rain water as coolant.

    I see nobody mentioning the ice from your fridge/freezer that can be used? Have read that the water should not be in contact with metals for it to be distilled.
    When boiling the water does the water not touch the element or nowadays the metal bottom of ketel?
    Maybe I'm overthinking these things.
    The ice from fridge/freezer has not been contaminated with bird poo, no metals was in contact,no chemicals from the atmosphere!
    Bottom line for me. Ice ice baby.
    This is my 2c.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •