1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 10





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  1. #181
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    With the apron stripped, Carl and myself decided to split the work tasks.

    He started stripping paint on the stand, bed and headstock and myself ... well, I made coffee ...







    After the cups of Brain energy, I started off by getting the brass machine plaques removed from the headstock, gearbox and apron. What a job as the Brutish Butcher simply drilled new holes into the plaques and then into the cast steel. Once he has made his holes, he used pop-rivets to secure the plaques to the machine. The issue I have is that when you drill pop-rivets out, the hard steel ball bit simply spins around in the hole and refuses to be drilled out. I tried punching it to remain in place, but that only worked on one hole. Any ideas?

    First step was to get the headstock plaque off. That was quick and I only have the one after picture to show for the work.





    Next was the apron's plaques. Notice the pop-rivets and the one on the top plate secured through a new hole? Ai ai.





    Pop-rivet heads removed.





    And plaques removed. Interesting green poking from behind the plaques. That is about 4 layers of paint down!





    The headstock still had the pop-rivet bodies remaining. I was scared to drill these out and wreck the headstock. Alas I had nothing to fear! More later ....






    Carl is making progress.














    And that was the end of easy going for Carl! The first four layers of paint where it was in contact with oil came of fairly easy. The stand's paint was not exposed to oil and the paint simply refused to budge. Secondly it was extremely difficult to work under the apron. So we decided to remove the headstock and the bed from the stand so that we can rotate the stand as required. Working on a flat horisontal surface is so much easier than trying to work on your haunches ducking under a steel apron.

    So off we went on our journey of exploration. Aaaah a secret hole! What treasures await us in here?





    Before we removed the headstock we decided to but a wire brush on it to clean it so that we can see what is what and if there are any hidden bolts or fasteners we need to be aware of.

    All cleaned to the red primer layer. It took quite a few hours to get here!








    We discovered that the headstock had some holes plugged. Was this hole made obsolete by an upgrade in the lathe model design or layout? We also found the four cap screws holding the headstock to the bed.







    We back tracked a bit and removed the electrical motor. This was held in place by the most silly bolts I have ever seen. Who would ever want to use such bolts to secure a heavy motor?





    The motor removed.





    It is a heavy duty induction motor made by GEC Machines in South Africa.





    The name plaque cleaned so that we all can read it clearly now!





    And it was time for some ... ai, coffee and calling it a day. After all we still need to clean the mess we made on the floor and get ready for the heavy lifting tomorrow!

  2. #182
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Is that vfd going to work on that motor? You are going to have fun lining the headstock true to the ways.

  3. #183
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Is that vfd going to work on that motor? You are going to have fun lining the headstock true to the ways.
    I have no idea if it will work and be capable of handling the high frequencies. Let's see.

    The headstock can only fit in one place and in one position from what I could determine. Lining it up should be fairly simple using a laser and a mirror. That is how we normally line things up on site on a larger scale and the same principles will apply on a small scale albeit at smaller order of things.

  4. #184
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    And it was night and the work of our hands was good.
    Time to rest the body, to bring peace to spirit and soul ...
    Dreams of foreign creatures, reluctantly making way for a newborn morrow.
    Time to rise, to create, to rejoice in the work of our hands ...

    -------



    Onto dismantling the major parts of the lathe we go. Out came the block and tackle and a short section of lifting chain. The chain was bolted to the headstock using cap screws screwed into the holes of the top plate securing bolts.





    We were quite concerned that the headstock could be stuck after all the years and while I kept a guarding eye, Carl operated the block and tackle. The headstock took a few taps with a heavy rubber hammer to move and break free. Ahh, a song by my fav band sprung to mind ... bring it on Queen You can make a guess as to which song this would be.









    Safely on its own workbench with the underside looking at the sunlight for a bit.





    I am a firm believer that you clean a part as soon as you removed it. To store dirty parts is simply a nightmare as each time you touch it to find something else your hands are dirty. So I set out cleaning the headstock as far as I could and Carl started cleaning the bed as far as he could.

    First step was to remove the pop-rivets from the headstock. Punching the little round ball end of the pop-rivet only worked on one which I could drill out completely.





    The rest I will remove with your guidance.

    As we worked Carl called me over. Look what he discovered!





    Do you know what this means?

    Carl asked that I remove the oilers in the tailstock end of the bed as he wanted to start removing the paint in that area. So how do I do this? I remembered my faithfull tack nail remover and decided to try it. It worked a treat!




    Once the oilers moved I could use an old and large set of extractor pliers which belonged to my granddad in yonder years.





    The rest of the afternoon was spent removing paint. Me on the headstock and Carl on the lathe bed.








    And once again the day flew past us ... and it was good.


  5. #185
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    My suggestion for removing the pop rivets is as follows. Drill the aluminium with an end mill until the ball stops it. Then you should be able to scratch out the ball with a pick or use a magnet. And can after that, drill out the remainder of the pop rivet aluminium.
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  6. #186
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    My suggestion for removing the pop rivets is as follows. Drill the aluminium with an end mill until the ball stops it. Then you should be able to scratch out the ball with a pick or use a magnet. And can after that, drill out the remainder of the pop rivet aluminium.
    I have tried getting something into the hole but it is only 3,5mm in diameter. Can I fit an end mill to a cordless drill? Each current hole is drilled at a unique angle as these were all obviously done by hand.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I didnt know a rivit would work in a blind hole .I think you have a good chance of breaking an end mill and they are not cheap, . Cant you try screwing in a self tapping screw and see if you can use a sliding hammer to get it out. Or could you not deform it enough that it is peened tight into the hole that a 3,5mm drill will eventually be able to drill it out without it spinning. Are you going to make brass rivits afterwards to put them back on.?

  8. #188
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I did that trick more than 10 years ago. Wasn't a lot of holes, maybe two or so and it did work.
    You can also accomplish a lot with self tapping screws. I searched for and found 2mm x 20mm self tapping screws to use as easy outs for pins etc that move in a straight line.
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  9. #189
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I didnt know a rivit would work in a blind hole .I think you have a good chance of breaking an end mill and they are not cheap, . Cant you try screwing in a self tapping screw and see if you can use a sliding hammer to get it out. Or could you not deform it enough that it is peened tight into the hole that a 3,5mm drill will eventually be able to drill it out without it spinning. Are you going to make brass rivits afterwards to put them back on.?
    Pop-rivets are not supposed to work in a blind hole. But here we are. The holes are at least 10-15mm deep in places. I have tried peening and it only worked in one place. I will try and make a flat end drill bit and see if that will work instead of using an end mill. Otherwise I am going to inject epoxy in the hole and then drill all out once it is set.

    I was thinking of using brass or copper rivets yes and fix these by pre-expanding the ends going into the hole a tiny bit.

  10. #190
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    I did that trick more than 10 years ago. Wasn't a lot of holes, maybe two or so and it did work.
    You can also accomplish a lot with self tapping screws. I searched for and found 2mm x 20mm self tapping screws to use as easy outs for pins etc that move in a straight line.
    Thanks @Spiceman, good to know that it does indeed work.

    Yeah the spline pins I have removed before with self tappers. Great tip.

  11. #191
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    If the holes are deep enough, leave the poprivets and put in the brass rivets in. Although I guess you are like me. If it doesn't belong there, it must be removed. Even if it takes a week.
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    If the holes are deep enough, leave the poprivets and put in the brass rivets in. Although I guess you are like me. If it doesn't belong there, it must be removed. Even if it takes a week.
    Yes I think you have guessed Mygoggie perfectly.Although I noticed his no ten spanner was missing on his wall organiser and his one bobbajaan spanner was hanging off level by at least 2 degrees.

  13. #193
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Yes I think you have guessed Mygoggie perfectly.Although I noticed his no ten spanner was missing on his wall organiser and his one bobbajaan spanner was hanging off level by at least 2 degrees.
    Spot on.....
    Maybe he was busy with the 10 when the photo was taken but that bobbejaan spanner.... eish thats unforgiveable
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  14. #194
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Yes I think you have guessed Mygoggie perfectly.Although I noticed his no ten spanner was missing on his wall organiser and his one bobbajaan spanner was hanging off level by at least 2 degrees.
    Ja ja, daai is eintlik 'n 11/32" AF spanner wat ek nog soek. That is my AF, BSF and BSW spanner rack. The metrics are all in tool trays.

    I will adjust the one bobbejaan ... Sorry about that. I think it is a bit restless as it has not been used on the lathe project... You know, as per the Brutish Butcher ...
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/03 at 01:08 PM.

  15. #195
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    If the holes are deep enough, leave the poprivets and put in the brass rivets in. Although I guess you are like me. If it doesn't belong there, it must be removed. Even if it takes a week.
    Correctly guessed. I want those OUT!! I lay awake and think of plans to get these aliens removed.

  16. #196
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quite a bit of usefull information was proposed above. Thanks guys!

    I managed to get two more pop-rivet ends out by taking the advice and adapting it to what I had on hand. I took a 3mm drill and ground the end square. This cut into the remains of the rivet and with the first one it came out cleanly on its own. The second one locked the square face drill bit and I could put the cordless in reverse and reverse the rivet end out.

    Number three refused to do anything. It did not want to be drilled at all. The metal simply is too hard. So I reverted to using a dentist drill bit. Yes, the one that makes the lovely whistling noise in your skull while the assistant is asking if you are OK. I have no idea how an assistant can ever think that you can answer with your skull vibrating, your mouth full of pipes, a fountain of water spraying down your throat whilst she is trying to suck your uvula out.

    Anyway, on that lovely thought let's get back to the third remaining rivet end. I used the dentist drill bit and my dremel tool and started cutting away at the rivet end. I think I managed to remove about 3/4 of the ball and called it quits. It won ... however the hole is deep enough to fit a brass rivet into it.

    The three pop-rivet ends in the holes on the headstock that gave me grief ...

    Top right - BEFORE





    Top right - AFTER






    Bottom right - BEFORE





    Bottom right - AFTER






    Bottom left - BEFORE






    Bottom left - AFTER spending quite a while with the dentist


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  18. #197
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Back to real space time ...

    Good news! I had a message that all the bronze bushes were checked and new phosphor bronze bushes made by my friend where required. He also made a new LH thread carriage screw nut.

    I am also taking a few panels in for cleaning and cadmium plating. So much easier!

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  20. #198
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    And we're all still watching.
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  22. #199
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Onto stripping the gearbox front plate or as the parts manual states, the Feedbox Cover. I wonder what tiny animals could possibly live in there?

    Unfortunately I did not take a picture of what it looked before I started working on it. The best I can do is this older photo of what the outside looks like.





    It has three levers to be removed. So lets start with the two that are located close together. Almost like twins.







    As you can see each lever has an arm on the inside which is held onto the shaft with a pin. This specific type is what is known as a Mills pin and belongs to the family of groove pins. Sounds almost like a biology class!





    You need to knock the pin out and the arm can be pulled from the shaft and the lever with the shaft can the be pulled from the Feedbox Cover. Hey Farmer Joe, what have you there?

    A quick clean on the wire brush made the lever and arm look almost new. I am still deciding if I must polish these levers.








    The other one of the twins (is that how you say it in Ingelish?) was next to be released.








    Same procedure to follow and there it is. This one has a ball that is suppose to click into a hole in the Feedbox Cover. Alas, no spring was to be found. Oh well, something more to make or find.







    And then it was time for the last lever. The one with the heavy round thinghy at the back that does not go round and round. The one which allows you to select metric, neutral or English thread. I told you this lathe is not called the funny lathe for nothing! Who has ever heard of a neutral thread or an English thread? Which English thread would that be? Johnny's thread?










    Out with the grub screw and the round thinghy still refused to budge. Looking closely I saw there is another Mills pin to be knocked out.






    With the pin out, the round thinghy could be removed from the shaft. It came off quite easily!







    Next in line was the brass plaque. Pop-rivets once again ...





    I drilled the heads off and off came the plaque. Aha, same old green paint!





    I tried to see how the sight glass can be removed, but alas, after reading a lot online it appears that you need to break it to get it out.





    Do you see what I see? The twins both should have a ball and spring that clicks into the holes in the Feedstock plate. Aagh, I mean Feeding place, ok you know what I mean ...


    With only one ball and no springs, the lever twins saga became interesting. OK, lets leave this for later. What else?

    A pin! Aha, what species is this one? It looks like a solid pin.









    I do not like feeding plates laying around on a pin, so I knocked the pin out. Simple as that.

    Then onto stripping the paint from the plate. It took quite a while to get the numerous layers removed and leave only the remnants of the zinc chromate primer in place.





    Then it was time for the wire brush. It came quite clean!







    Onto cleaning the inner face of the Feedbox Cover.






    And .... it was then that I noticed it ....






    Looking closer ....










    Do you see what I saw?

    Someone must have hated oil ...

    The Brutish Butcher drill straight through the Feeding plate to install his pop-rivets. He obviously had a devious plan to ensure that this gearbox will see only a very minute portion of oil in the bottom thereof.

    Bliksem en donder ...

    More fixing work to do.

    On that note Carl asked if I was ready to help him. He has reached the end of his capabilities of cleaning the lathe bed and stand with it standing upright. After a short meeting with coffee and no cake or rusks we decided to remove the bed from the stand. More of this adventure in the next post!

    .... and the Fat Lady still sings beautifully ...

  23. #200
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Exciting times ... time to remove a bed!

    I read a bit online and asked here and there and Phil said that there are only six big cap screws to remove. I must just be careful to ensure that the oil seals between the bed's feet and the top of the stand are replaced correctly.

    Yep, and there the cap screws are.





    I really wish I had a full set of AF hex key sockets. These brutes were not easy to dislodge with the biggest key Uncle Allen could offer us.





    After the six cap screws were removed, we installed the block and tackle to lift from the normal lifting point in the bed. Here Carl is super excited as the heavy bed came away with no effort!





    We lowered the bed onto two trolley workbenches and pushed it to one side.






    Alas no oil seals were to be seen. No wonder the top drawer and the electrical motor cabinet were full of oil!








    With the bed out of the way, Carl could strip the paint from the top of the stand.






    And then it was time for ... ??

    Coffee ...

    And time to think ... and have a meeting and take time to talk a lot of sense. You see, we do not have time to waste. Here we make a quick calculated decision. Unlike our honest politicians (refer to a post far far above in another time).

    As we wanted to clean all the sides of the stand quickly we wanted to work from the top as far as possible. So I got two pallets from the Boss' garden and we laid the stand down on these on its back. We had to support it on car stands and some wood blocks to make it stable. And presto, Carl could start brushing the soft and loose top layers of paint off. Nothing like painting it with old brake fluid (from my Pajero restoration project) and leaving it overnight to make the paint go soft. Cheap and effective!





    First paint layers removed. Now the hard part comes as the next three layers (green, light grey and what appears to be a dark grey body filler) do not want to soften with brake fluid or thinners or acetone.





    While Carl was working on the stand I cleaned the headstock of any remaining grease with a toothbrush. Bring it on Corporal! You taught me well. I also injected windshield cleaner into the little holes of the sight glass to dissolve the grime, grease and oil on the back of the glass.





    And then before we realised it, the day has passed. A goodnight picture telling a good story


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