1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 6





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  1. #101
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois Theron View Post
    Guys, please stick to English
    Jammer Oom ... ons sal try.

  2. #102
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    The grubscrews are painted port and starboard.
    Well spotted @plunger and @spiceman! Yes, someone marked the collars port and starboard to indicate which one is the right hand and which one is the left hand collar. That someone must have had a sailing or aviation background. I find that very interesting.

    BTW if you do not know which colour indicates which side the rhyme goes as follows: "There is no more red port left."
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/05/25 at 10:48 PM.

  3. #103
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    So the feedshaft is removed and I still have no idea as to how the leadscrew is to be removed.

    I watched the video again and the only real guidance there was how to remove the tumbler locating strip. It is that black metal strip full of holes I tried to loosen a few days back. The guy in the video showed he undid the cap screw by inserting the long side of Uncle Allen's key into it and turning it loose with the short side. He must be very very very strong ...

    OK, let me show my strength...

    If it breaks, it breaks is my motto now. So I took the longest ring spanner I had, and hooked it onto the long side (yes I am chicken Chuck) of Uncle Allen's key.





    I took a deep breath and pulled the spanner. Nothing. I turned it until the key was bowing like a bow, ready to shoot an arrow into the wide yonder. Nothing. Stuff this I said and I pulled it some more and with a loud snap sound the spanner came free. What broke? Spanner is fine, Uncle Allen's key is fine and the cap screw looked like it turned!!

    Its mate got the same treatment after cleaning the cap screw hole carefully. It tried to beat it's mate's releasing cry and came loose with an almighty snap sound.

    The strip was still laying solidly in place. A tad lazy I if you ask me, so I gave it a bit of a tap with the dead blow hammer. It woke from it slumber with a slight sliding motion.





    And out it came ...





    The two spacers did not move, so I let them be as they could be part of the casing. A bit of time datum advancing proved that they are actually loose, but were just gummed into location. More later when this time meets future time.

    What next? Nothing ... I simply had to find a way to get the leadscrew loose from the gearbox. I took a very strong light and looked carefully. On the left of the gearbox wall on the shaft that forms part of the leadscrew line is a slotted coller. It looked more or less the same as the two that were on the feedshaft and allowed me to gave you a practical mathematics lesson.

    OK, my friend, if you are slotted, you must be able to turn. I took out a very goog quality screwdriver and gave it a firm sharp tap. Yeah, OK ...





    Low and behold, it moved! Tap, tap and more tap and then some more. Slowly the leadscrew moved towards the right until the nut unscrewed completely.






    Once the nut was removed I could start moving the leadscrew towards the tailstock end.





    It was a wiggle of the apron, the leadscrew, the apron, the leadscrew, the apron ... OK, you get the drift. A fine dance it was without stepping on each other's toes. When the fat lady sang, the apron was resting on the blocks, and the leadscrew was laying in a ditch at the back of the bed. What a night it was!

    Finally I could start stripping the gearbox!

    Watching a few more videos on YouTube! I saw that there are grub screws in the vertical support sections of the gearbox. These hold the bushes in place. To remove the bushes, you need to remove the grub screws.

    Can you see the grub screws?





    No, neither can I. Seems like our Brutish Butcher was here ... "Hey, there are some grub screws left over!" ... "Well the lathe is working, so chuck them". Sounds familiar someone??

    Moving onto the central vertical support. Yeah, there are the beauties!





    And the left most support? Yebo yes!





    Off we go to Uncle Allen to find one of his keys that will fit. Out came the grub screws.





    There the sad family lies. Sorely missing two of their kind. The collars are the two end ones for the feedshaft. The ones with the nautical or aviation connection.





    Next step. I want the bushes removed, so lets do that. Taking my aluminium rod I first tapped the central one out. It came out quite easily.





    Then the right hand one.









    Here they are. All strung up djou Honour.





    Onto getting the middle shaft and gears off. This shaft is called the coneshaft. On the left is a collar with a grub screw which I promptly undid with the help of Uncle Allen.





    I stuck a screwdriver between the collar and the edge of the shoulder of the shaft and gave it some leverage. It moved, no it did not! Looking closely I could see some thread! Aha, got you you sneaky Turning the collar with the Allen key







    I could then simply pull the shaft to the right by hand. Weird feeling not to have to tap a shaft out!




    Three shafts left!





    Onto getting the left hand bottom one out. Hang on, looking at the parts list this appears to be one shaft that runs the length of the gearbox!





    I moved the gears to the left and hello! A circlip appears.





    And promptly breaks ... ai toggie.





    OK, what now?





    Watching the video it appears that you need to tap the shaft to the left hand side and it will take the bush with it, both moving together. So I started tapping and with almost no effort the bush started moving.





    And promptly made a solid noise and refused to move. Hmmm ... time for some coffee ...

    With some wisdom added to Brain, it seems like the small gear in the red shafty thingy is stuck on the shaft. So I knocked the shaft back a tiny bit and the gear could move. OK, time to remove you Mr Gear. No, not you Richard!





    Thanks Mr Allen! Ooops not so fast. That is a pin and not a grub screw! Let's tap you out Mr Pin.





    With the gear removed, the red shafty thingy was free to allow the shaft to slide. Or is that now the other way round? The shaft free to slide?





    Yes, purple gloves and grease do not go together? So why does the Doc put one on when he uses Vaseline ...

    And out came the red shafty thingy. You need to move it as far to the left as possible and it will swivel enough in the right hand bush to be pulled forward on the left end.





    That left the left middle shaft. This is called the intershaft with 14 teeth. What a weird name.





    Coffee time ... Ha, Brain was well energised and I spotted the gear's secret quickly. An angled grub screw in the gear's collar. Uncle Allen helped us out quickly.





    By now I was used to tapping shafts to shift bushes. Tap it to the left, tap it to the left ... sounds like a kid's song.







    And suddenly the gearbox was void and empty and the smell of old oil was all that remains ...

    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/05/25 at 11:22 PM.

  4. #104
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Luckily you're taking all the photos. Would love to see you put this all back together in 6 months without them.
    Jakes Louw
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  5. #105
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Fascinating thread!
    Respect!

    The designer was a genius (or not!). Imagine detailing all that without the help of CAD!!

    I trust your catalog of parts and photos make re-assembly possible / easy.
    (show us how you store the removed parts)

    Even at a conservative hourly rate, your time-cost would have bought a very fancy lathe and milling machine!
    Last edited by 4eTouareg; 2020/05/26 at 09:03 AM.
    "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity" - Martin Luther king Jr

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  6. #106
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eTouareg View Post
    Fascinating thread!
    Respect!

    The designer was a genius (or not!). Imagine detailing all that without the help of CAD!!

    I trust your catalog of parts and photos make re-assembly possible / easy.
    (show us how you store the removed parts)

    Even at a conservative hourly rate, your time-cost would have bought a very fancy lathe and milling machine!
    Thanks @4eToureg. It does take a lot of time to write each post up, but that it is like you said required for record keeping as well as to assist others in the world. There is a very limited source of knowledge on the repair of these lathes.

    Looking from an engineering point of view you can see how the designers solved issues using emperical methods. I just discovered blanking plugs in the headstock casing which shows that an earlier design was changed to a more workable one. You can see that they used slide rulers and logarithm tables.

    Good idea on a storage post. Effective storage is key to any restoration project. Will do so.

    Time I have plenty of ... just heard today that New Zealand will not accept any migrant skills for quite a while. That means my job there is lost as is a LOT of money I spent on visas etc etc. Anyway, life goes on and we need to adjust to the new way of doing business. It is how you stand up after you fell that counts. Not the fact that you have fallen which is very easy to do.
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/05/26 at 09:51 AM.

  7. #107
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    Luckily you're taking all the photos. Would love to see you put this all back together in 6 months without them.
    I will not be able to do assembling without reference to photos. Just simply too big a Meccano set this one!

  8. #108
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Jammer Oom ... ons sal try.
    Ek het nie van die letterlike taal gepraat nie

    Party van die terminologie is net vir my onbekend. Ek voel net dom!

    Very nice and interesting thread though. I had about 6 months worth of fitting and turning training many years ago and never realised a lathe had so many parts!
    We can't change the wind but we can set our sails

  9. #109
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Excellent thread! Thanks for taking the time to take photos and post, it really is time consuming to do so!

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois Theron View Post
    Ek het nie van die letterlike taal gepraat nie

    Party van die terminologie is net vir my onbekend. Ek voel net dom!

    Very nice and interesting thread though. I had about 6 months worth of fitting and turning training many years ago and never realised a lathe had so many parts!
    Ek weet, dis maar net fyn spot na jou kant toe.

    Vra as jy nie verstaan nie, dan maak ek 'n punt om dit te verduidelik.
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/05/26 at 05:58 PM.

  11. #111
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Commander View Post
    Excellent thread! Thanks for taking the time to take photos and post, it really is time consuming to do so!
    Only a pleasure @Commander. Thanks for the positive comment! It helps to keep the motivation level high!

  12. #112
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I have learnt at least one thing from this thread - Don't ever tackle the refurbishment of such a monster!
    "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity" - Martin Luther king Jr

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  13. #113
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eTouareg View Post
    I have learnt at least one thing from this thread - Don't ever tackle the refurbishment of such a monster!
    I've learnt something else: always look for the grub screw.
    Jakes Louw
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  14. #114
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    I've learnt something else: always look for the grub screw.
    .. or the dreaded threaded collar!

  15. #115
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I have to echo what Commander said. I enjoy this thread emmensely. Although my head is spinning like Jelo's and Francois Theron's heads from all the (foreign) terms.
    Keep up the good work. We want to see it working again soon.
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    I have to echo what Commander said. I enjoy this thread emmensely. Although my head is spinning like Jelo's and Francois Theron's heads from all the (foreign) terms.
    Keep up the good work. We want to see it working again soon.
    Thanks @Spiceman. How did Yolanda from Orkey Snorkey put it? "I love when you speak foreign .."

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    With the leadscrew removed I could finally slide the saddle off the bed at the tailstock end.

    And there the saddle suddenly found itself upside down. Can you see the saddle front strip that made things a tiny tad difficult?





    Time to remove the two cap screws that hold the saddle front strip down.





    The saddle found itself stripped of the last part and it was time to store it for cleaning.

    Onto attending to the two lonely gear shifting levers in the headstock. Carl has been cleaning and removing grease over a few days using a whole bale of rags and 3 liters of paraffin in the process. At long last we could see how to disassemble these. On this funny lathe, there is a nut on the underside of the vertical spindle that needs to be undone.







    The spanner to use is a 13/16" AF and you will need a lot of patience to get the nut removed. There is not a lot of space to work with and you ideally need an offset spanner. Remember that as the nut nears the end of the thread, you need to lift the handle assembly so that the nut is lifted away from the headstock bottom, allowing the spanner better turning room.





    And there the headstock was ... void and empty and the smell of old oil, aaagh, I mean grease, was all that remains ...

    Since I am now a wonder at removing bushes, I tackled the tailstock end support for the leadscrew and feedshaft.




    Checking for grub screws that holds the bushes fast, I found nothing .... strange.

    Check again Brain said. If it is too easy you have overlooked the obvious. Murphey's Law #8 if I remember correctly. So what I thought earlier to be an empty hole in the support, in fact was hiding a grub screw.





    Using my phone's camera, we spotted the bottom one as well! Took a bit of cleaning by feel, but we got the hole cleared for Uncle Allen's to do the removal.





    A quick knock with the aluminium bar and there the rascals lay. Like two sweet little sleeping kids.







    Just to make sure they behave Carl tied them up ... he was not taking any chances! The grub screws went into the rag pocket to keep them company. Almost like a rag doll, come to think of it.





    Finally .... There she stands. Stripped of all parts except the electrical motor. Time to reflect on what we have done!


  18. #118
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    This is a mesmerizing thread to follow, thank you for taking the time and effort to post.

    I trained (and qualified via a train trip to Oliphantsfontien) as a Fitter & Turner in the late 80's and we did all our turning on a slightly newer model of this lathe. The one with the conical speed selectors. One of my fellow Apprentices totally messed up (read destroyed) some of the drive gears in the carriage which we had to strip and rebuild, what a great learning curve when you are a raw Appy!!

    Great machines these and made to last.

  19. #119
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Thank you for this thread, it makes for very interesting reading and great entertainment, I cannot wait to read the next chapter every morning. How I wished I had a beer whilst reading this thread, I can just imagine how you must feel....coffee is nice, but beer is betterrer...

  20. #120
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Dankie baie @PaulWW en @Dewald Posthumus!

    @PaulWW is will be good if you can travel back in time and grab some memories on the quirks of these lathes and jot them down here. Always good info for others.

    Yes, @Dewald, beer is the betterderste! :dop:

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