1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 5





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  1. #81
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I must just say how much I'm enjoying this thread at the moment. I started the week off a bit depro with all this Covid lockdown and with kids and working from home that is driving me crazy.
    But something like this takes me to my happy place, and makes me sit on the edge of my seat waiting for my next fix to be posted.
    I'm Also learning a lot, thanks guys keep it coming!
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  3. #82
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I have no idea how to use a lathe or what Mygoggie is talking about half the time but I'm loving the narrative.
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  5. #83
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Were did I leave off? Oh yeah, I just removed the compound slide.

    Our time travel time frame of current time has now reached the few threads back's future travel time frame. So, we should be meeting ourselves now! They say that if you meet yourself in the same time frame, do not hug each other as you will remove the time datum and both of you will disappear. How do the scientists know this? Have they tried touching themselves? If so, and they disappeared, it must be the truth, but how can they then be writing about this truth? So they must be serving us a lie as the truth. What about all the other things that these liars then could be serving us as the truth? This theorem of mine therefore proofs that all scientists must be politicians. All politicians cannot be scientists as they already know and orate everything as the holy truth and we have just proven that scientists cannot be truthful. So scientists can be politicians, but politicians cannot be scientists. Food for thought!

    Onto removing the cross slide while keeping one eye out for myself.

    I removed the cross-slide screw's nut's bolt (that is a lot of 's es <-- how do you spell esses?) at the back and removed the cross-slide screw. It is that long thin steel wormy thing that pulls or pushes the cross-slide when you turn da' handle.

    Now the cross-slide must pull off the saddle. OK, let me try again. It is stuck! Trying to find new words as I promised myself I will not swear on the holy Saturday. I cannot find any new words and gave up. That is on trying to remove the cross-slide.... Coffee time. Catch some vitamin D in the sun. The scientists say Antie Corona does not like Vitamin D ... hmmm have they asked her? Refer to my theorem.

    BTW, I have another theorem that is absolutely proven whenever I drive at dusk. It goes as follows: "The darker the colour of the approaching car, the greater the chance that its lights will not be switched on." This is the truth so I cannot be a scientist. OK, also politics can then never be for me...

    So sitting in the sun catching some D's... Brain says: "Make a puller and pull that speed gear off" and off I went to a few posts back in time. And now I am back. Gear pulled, all parts repaired. Warping ahead from back there in time we are here again. Are you still with me? Welcome to mygoggie's world of logic!

    Time to pull the ON/OFF and brake handle. The handle is located on a shaft that protrudes at the back and then bottom of the headstock. On the shaft is an arm which is a bit hidden. In this arm is a grub screw. On this grub screw is a flea and on the flea a bacteria. It is the bacteria on the flea on the grub screw .... ... .. and the tree in the hole and the green grass grows around it ... (With reference to a popular old folk Afrikaans song about the hole in the ground).

    Once the grub screw located in the arm on the shaft as found at the back of the headstock was loosened and removed, I could simply pull on the handle and it came out easily. Unbelievable and an unbelievably long confusing sentence.










    By now Brain has told me how to solve the stuckup cross-slide. Take her down Pappa, take her down with force. So I took two slide clamps, hooked these onto the back of the cross-slide and the front of the apron and put some tension on the cross-slide.





    It took some force, but she came off. The gibs were jammed with gunk and prevented a smooth slide.





    You see, sometimes force does work. But you need to delicately apply it without the person or item you apply it too, realises it. Sounds like Antie Corona's non-scientist friends in the higher escalons of our social levels.

    Next in line was the saddle locking clamp that locks the carriage in place. Looking at the parts list, wrong type of bolt. OK, sigh. The Brutish Butcher was here. Removing the bolt and the locking clamp I could see he truly was here.





    How is this for locating a threaded hole? You measure incorrectly, drill in the wrong place, tap it and then ... it does not fit. Easy fix, simply grind the block of steel away till it fits. The bolt will grip in air. No issues.





    OK, let's try the carriage way now. Still not moving ... So I undid the cap scews holding the apron to the saddle. This should allow the gears on the inside to drop away from the lead screw (the long threaded bar thingy at the top running all along the lathe). The apron dropped a bit and the gears felt loose. Let's try moving the carriage. Aha, it moves something like 2" at a time. Since the lathe is imperial, maybe we should stick to imperial measurements. Nope, I am not British. The carriage moved about 50mm.

    Now, how to get the carriage or maybe only the saddle removed? It will not slide past the tail end of the lathe as the lead screw support is in the way. Secondly we also have the problem that the saddle and apron (bolted together forming the carriage) do not want part ways.

    Back to Mr DuckDuckGo ... and some coffee. Sorry no more D's. It was past sunset.

    The solution it seems is to remove the gap piece in the bed and slide the carriage to the left over the now large gap. The writer states that the saddle gibs should now be free from the underside of the bed top as there is no bed underside in the gap. OK, I get it. A gap by definition is void of anything so the saddle can simply be lifted up through the void.

    Onto removing the two visible bolts I installed when lifting the lathe. Do not ask me where I safely stored the cap screws. I have absolutely no idea.





    OK, it does not move. Aha, two hidden cap screws on the left side of the gap piece.





    With these out, the gap piece moved and I could remove it.

    With 50mm bounces I moved the carriage over the larger gap. Double checked that is as close as possible to the headstock without jamming on it. Lifting the saddle resulted in the left hand side lifting and the right hand side looking at me as to say why should I move? Like my Chow-Chow: "You threw the ball, so go and fetch it yourself!"

    The saddle remains stuck to the underside of the bed. New words were born ...

    Now what now? I 50mm hopped the carriage to the centre of the lead screw to give me a balanced approach in finding a solution to the problem.

    No beer, no coffee ... I had my limit of caffeine ... bring it on Bob Marley.

    Only way out now was to start removing the lead screw and the round bar thingy with the slot in it below. That is called the feedshaft. At the moment it was only feeding my frustration.

    I had enough and it was time to call it a night and give Brain some time to come up with a solution.
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/05/22 at 10:50 PM.

  6. #84
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Were did I leave off? Oh yeah, I just removed the compound slide.

    Our time travel time frame of current time has now reached the few threads back's future travel time frame. So, we should be meeting ourselves now! They say that if you meet yourself in the same time frame, do not hug each other as you will remove the time datum and both of you will disappear. How do the scientists know this? Have they tried touching themselves? If so, and they disappeared, it must be the truth, but how can they then be writing about this truth? So they must be serving us a lie as the truth. What about all the other things that these liars then could be serving us as the truth? This theorem of mine therefore proofs that all scientists must be politicians. All politicians cannot be scientists as they already know and orate everything as the holy truth and we have just proven that scientists cannot be truthful. So scientists can be politicians, but politicians cannot be scientists. Food for thought!

    Onto removing the cross slide while keeping one eye out for myself.

    I removed the cross-slide screw's nut's bolt (that is a lot of 's es <-- how do you spell esses?) at the back and removed the cross-slide screw. It is that long thin steel wormy thing that pulls or pushes the cross-slide when you turn da' handle.

    Now the cross-slide must pull off the saddle. OK, let me try again. It is stuck! Trying to find new words as I promised myself I will not swear on the holy Saturday. I cannot find any new words and gave up. That is on trying to remove the cross-slide.... Coffee time. Catch some vitamin D in the sun. The scientists say Antie Corona does not like Vitamin D ... hmmm have they asked her? Refer to my theorem.

    BTW, I have another theorem that is absolutely proven whenever I drive at dusk. It goes as follows: "The darker the colour of the approaching car, the greater the chance that its lights will not be switched on." This is the truth so I cannot be a scientist. OK, also politics can then never be for me...

    So sitting in the sun catching some D's... Brain says: "Make a puller and pull that speed gear off" and off I went to a few posts back in time. And now I am back. Gear pulled, all parts repaired. Warping ahead from back there in time we are here again. Are you still with me? Welcome to mygoggie's world of logic!

    Time to pull the ON/OFF and brake handle. The handle is located on a shaft that protrudes at the back and then bottom of the headstock. On the shaft is an arm which is a bit hidden. In this arm is a grub screw. On this grub screw is a flea and on the flea a bacteria. It is the bacteria on the flea on the grub screw .... ... .. and the tree in the hole and the green grass grows around it ... (With reference to a popular old folk Afrikaans song about the hole in the ground).

    Once the grub screw located in the arm on the shaft as found at the back of the headstock was loosened and removed, I could simply pull on the handle and it came out easily. Unbelievable and an unbelievably long confusing sentence.










    By now Brain has told me how to solve the stuckup cross-slide. Take her down Pappa, take her down with force. So I took two slide clamps, hooked these onto the back of the cross-slide and the front of the apron and put some tension on the cross-slide.





    It took some force, but she came off. The gibs were jammed with gunk and prevented a smooth slide.





    You see, sometimes force does work. But you need to delicately apply it without the person or item you apply it too, realises it. Sounds like Antie Corona's non-scientist friends in the higher escalons of our social levels.

    Next in line was the saddle locking clamp that locks the carriage in place. Looking at the parts list, wrong type of bolt. OK, sigh. The Brutish Butcher was here. Removing the bolt and the locking clamp I could see he truly was here.





    How is this for locating a threaded hole? You measure incorrectly, drill in the wrong place, tap it and then ... it does not fit. Easy fix, simply grind the block of steel away till it fits. The bolt will grip in air. No issues.





    OK, let's try the carriage way now. Still not moving ... So I undid the cap scews holding the apron to the saddle. This should allow the gears on the inside to drop away from the lead screw (the long threaded bar thingy at the top running all along the lathe). The apron dropped a bit and the gears felt loose. Let's try moving the carriage. Aha, it moves something like 2" at a time. Since the lathe is imperial, maybe we should stick to imperial measurements. Nope, I am not British. The carriage moved about 50mm.

    Now, how to get the carriage or maybe only the saddle removed? It will not slide past the tail end of the lathe as the lead screw support is in the way. Secondly we also have the problem that the saddle and apron (bolted together forming the carriage) do not want part ways.

    Back to Mr DuckDuckGo ... and some coffee. Sorry no more D's. It was past sunset.

    The solution it seems is to remove the gap piece in the bed and slide the carriage to the left over the now large gap. The writer states that the saddle gibs should now be free from the underside of the bed top as there is no bed underside in the gap. OK, I get it. A gap by definition is void of anything so the saddle can simply be lifted up through the void.

    Onto removing the two visible bolts I installed when lifting the lathe. Do not ask me where I safely stored the cap screws. I have absolutely no idea.





    OK, it does not move. Aha, two hidden cap screws on the left side of the gap piece.





    With these out, the gap piece moved and I could remove it.

    With 50mm bounces I moved the carriage over the larger gap. Double checked that is as close as possible to the headstock without jamming on it. Lifting the saddle resulted in the left hand side lifting and the right hand side looking at me as to say why should I move? Like my Chow-Chow: "You threw the ball, so go and fetch it yourself!"

    The saddle remains stuck to the underside of the bed. New words were born ...

    Now what now? I 50mm hopped the carriage to the centre of the lead screw to give me a balanced approach in finding a solution to the problem.

    No beer, no coffee ... I had my limit of caffeine ... bring it on Bob Marley.

    Only way out now was to start removing the lead screw and the round bar thingy with the slot in it below. That is called the feedshaft. At the moment it was only feeding my frustration.

    I had enough and it was time to call it a night and give Brain some time to come up with a solution.
    Im chomping at the bit to make comments to help cause Ive done this a couple of times. My problem is I can do it and forget a week later.But because I dont have a timewarp machine I guess I just have to wait for you to return to our time dimension.
    Last edited by plunger; 2020/05/26 at 08:52 PM.

  7. #85
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Im chomping at the bit to make comments to help cause Ive done this a couple of times. My problem is I can do it and forget a week later.But because I dont have a timewarp machine I guess I just have to wait for you to return to our time dimension.
    Your comments and knowledge are bits of gold. Keep on adding valuable info as we all need to learn. Thanks so far!!

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  9. #86
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Some pics of a gear cutting setup as promised - this is a mockup using gears and flycutter bits already made.

    The flycutting toolbit is rough ground to form 2 hollows, bigger than the gap in the gear. A tapered grinding point is fixed into the lathe collet chuck, with the required equivalent circle diameter marked on it in pencil. The toolbit is fixed into a quick change toolholder, spaced so that it can be brought in both above and below the grinding point using the toolholder height adjustment screw. It is then positioned so that the front (cutting) edge is level with the pencil mark and the lathe carriage is locked. Toolbit is then set either above or below and moved very slowly into the grinding point. When one side is nice and cleanly ground, note the cross slide setting, move either up or down to the other face and come in to the same crossfeed setting, starting too low or too high depending. Then the tool holder can be inched up or down with the toolholder height adjusting screw and brought in to the same cross feed setting every time to keep the form symmetrical. As the toolholder locks to the same position every time, it can be removed and the toolbit shape compared to your gauge or template. I used an existing gear as a template. When the volute faces are good, finish off the end and the root radii by hand. It's much easier in practice than it sounds. You now have your fly cutter toolbit.

    On the mill, the gear blank is fixed onto a concentric mandrel which should be a firm push fit and this is fixed into the indexer. A tailstock is used on the centre drilled fastening bolt to hold everything firm. The mandrel and gear blank must be clocked parallel with the mill bed travel. A slitting saw set to shaft centre height is then used to rough gash out the teeth. Not necessary for nylon or brass gears but helps hugely with steel gears. Then the flycutter is set to shaft centre height and the teeth are cleaned out to profile - I would typically take 4-5 passes at least to get to final depth. Finally I take 2-3 finishing passes on the same setting to get a nice smooth finish on the teeth. A bit of cleaning up with a needle file and the job is done. It is a tedious method, but avoids buying a set of extremely expensive gear cutters and with a bit of patience and care will give an excellent result.

    Note the fly cutter - shown aso in a previous post. This was made specifically for cutting gears. It has a square slot the same width as the toolbit and pulls the toolbit in very tight and absolutely square to the axis of revolution.
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  10. #87
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by John Lindsay View Post
    Some pics of a gear cutting setup as promised - this is a mockup using gears and flycutter bits already made
    Thanks for this detailed photo story @John. It makes a lot of sense now. I will try this for sure!

  11. #88
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Onto trying to get the feedshaft and the leadscrew removed.

    I did not have the correct C-spanner to remove the lock nuts at the left hand side of the leadscrew. I dug around in my toolbox and found that the piston ring compressor's key fits perfectly in the slot.





    I will rather punch against this key before I hit the slotted nut. It has already been damaged quite severely so I did not want to cause more damage. Two very sharp punches and she was loose. The key to hitting something to get it loose is not to use force. Do not try to hit hard as you will create flying spanners and bent stuff and most probably blood flowing. Simply hit it with a very sharp motion. Not a good looking "sharp" but a very quick flick of the arm. You want momentum to loosen the item. Not force.

    On this topic. Momentum is the product of the mass of the hammer times the velocity it is traveling at. The formula is as follows:




    And the force applied to the object that you hit is the differential of the momentum with regards to the period of time during which the force is applied.




    This means a sharp blow will apply a lot more force in a short period of time than when you hit slower and try to hit hard. A simple applied mathematics lesson!

    The other nut of the locking pair then simply can be unscrewed as well.

    OK, the lead screw is now loose. How to remove it remains the question? Tugging on it did nothing. Pulling it with the 50mm jumping carriage did nothing. Another peek showed another collar on the inner side of the gearbox wall. It has a grub screw on it so time to loosen that and see what happens.





    Nothing ...





    I double checked the support on the tailstock end if there is maybe a locking something there. Nope, nothing. Just an empty hole. Something is missing from the hole, but nothing in there for now is good. Anyone knows what must be in the hole? There is nothing on the parts lists to indicate what goes into the hole.

    At this time Brain spoke up and said: "Leave it be". So I left it to be.

    Moving to the feedshaft. At the tailstock end there are two collars.





    I loosened the grub screws in each and removed the external one. I must remember this is the external one, so I took a photo thereof.





    Back to the gearbox end of the shaft. I cannot find anything holding it in place. Looking closer I could see "someone" damaged the edge of the feedshaft trying to force a screwdrive or similar inappropriate tool into the minute slot. Maybe this "somebody" had a point ... So I put the external end collar back onto the feedshaft, but left enough room between it and the support to allow me to insert an aluminium bar in the gap. Applying a bit of leverage made the feedshaft move to the right.





    The screwdriver is just to show the gap ...

    A tug on the shaft and out it popped and "clink" I heard. I hate that sound! Something dropped and I have no idea what. Can you see it??





    Turns out there are two balls located at the gearbox end of the feedshaft that locks the shaft into the gearbox shaft. Alas no springs behind the balls, so I wonder how these balls could ensure a decent lock. Appears our friendly Brutish Butcher decided to dispose of the springs ... Anyway I will sort that out when I assemble the shaft again.





    I read somewhere that you need to support the apron on blocks of wood when you pull the feedshaft as the carraige will now only hang from the leadscrew and will tilt suddenly forward. So I promptly did that. Hmmm ... remember the maths above. Sudden movement creates a lot of energy that needs to go somewhere. In this case towards bending the leadscrew.





    Righty ho, and out she came. And promptly stuck to the underside of the shelf of the adjacent wood rack. Out came the crowbar and I moved the lathe back towards the wall to allow the feedshaft to be extracted. I carefully pulled the feedshaft and checking that it will not hit the shelf again I gave it a last pull to free it from the carriage way. It came free with a bit of effort and I hear a load "clunk" ...

    Turning my head back to the carriage this greeted me ...





    Apparently this thinghy is called a wormbox. It is not mentioned anywhere and nobody online has ever seen one on a Colchester Student before. So a new name was given to my lathe. It is now called the "Funny Student" ... I do not think it is funny ...

    An interesting last tidbit. What is the origin of the word "tidbit"? As I laid the two feedshaft collars next to each other to take a photo, I saw something very interesting.





    Can you see it? Look closer and if you see it post the answer!

  12. #89
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6&quot; gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Onto trying to get the feedshaft and the leadscrew removed.

    I did not have the correct C-spanner to remove the lock nuts at the left hand side of the leadscrew. I dug around in my toolbox and found that the piston ring compressor's key fits perfectly in the slot.





    I will rather punch against this key before I hit the slotted nut. It has already been damaged quite severely so I did not want to cause more damage. Two very sharp punches and she was loose. The key to hitting something to get it loose is not to use force. Do not try to hit hard as you will create flying spanners and bent stuff and most probably blood flowing. Simply hit it with a very sharp motion. Not a good looking "sharp" but a very quick flick of the arm. You want momentum to loosen the item. Not force.

    On this topic. Momentum is the product of the mass of the hammer times the velocity it is traveling at. The formula is as follows:




    And the force applied to the object that you hit is the differential of the momentum with regards to the period of time during which the force is applied.




    This means a sharp blow will apply a lot more force in a short period of time than when you hit slower and try to hit hard. A simple applied mathematics lesson!

    The other nut of the locking pair then simply can be unscrewed as well.

    OK, the lead screw is now loose. How to remove it remains the question? Tugging on it did nothing. Pulling it with the 50mm jumping carriage did nothing. Another peek showed another collar on the inner side of the gearbox wall. It has a grub screw on it so time to loosen that and see what happens.





    Nothing ...





    I double checked the support on the tailstock end if there is maybe a locking something there. Nope, nothing. Just an empty hole. Something is missing from the hole, but nothing in there for now is good. Anyone knows what must be in the hole? There is nothing on the parts lists to indicate what goes into the hole.

    At this time Brain spoke up and said: "Leave it be". So I left it to be.

    Moving to the feedshaft. At the tailstock end there are two collars.





    I loosened the grub screws in each and removed the external one. I must remember this is the external one, so I took a photo thereof.





    Back to the gearbox end of the shaft. I cannot find anything holding it in place. Looking closer I could see "someone" damaged the edge of the feedshaft trying to force a screwdrive or similar inappropriate tool into the minute slot. Maybe this "somebody" had a point ... So I put the external end collar back onto the feedshaft, but left enough room between it and the support to allow me to insert an aluminium bar in the gap. Applying a bit of leverage made the feedshaft move to the right.





    The screwdriver is just to show the gap ...

    A tug on the shaft and out it popped and "clink" I heard. I hate that sound! Something dropped and I have no idea what. Can you see it??





    Turns out there are two balls located at the gearbox end of the feedshaft that locks the shaft into the gearbox shaft. Alas no springs behind the balls, so I wonder how these balls could ensure a decent lock. Appears our friendly Brutish Butcher decided to dispose of the springs ... Anyway I will sort that out when I assemble the shaft again.





    I read somewhere that you need to support the apron on blocks of wood when you pull the feedshaft as the carraige will now only hang from the leadscrew and will tilt suddenly forward. So I promptly did that. Hmmm ... remember the maths above. Sudden movement creates a lot of energy that needs to go somewhere. In this case towards bending the leadscrew.





    Righty ho, and out she came. And promptly stuck to the underside of the shelf of the adjacent wood rack. Out came the crowbar and I moved the lathe back towards the wall to allow the feedshaft to be extracted. I carefully pulled the feedshaft and checking that it will not hit the shelf again I gave it a last pull to free it from the carriage way. It came free with a bit of effort and I hear a load "clunk" ...

    Turning my head back to the carriage this greeted me ...





    Apparently this thinghy is called a wormbox. It is not mentioned anywhere and nobody online has ever seen one on a Colchester Student before. So a new name was given to my lathe. It is now called the "Funny Student" ... I do not think it is funny ...

    An interesting last tidbit. What is the origin of the word "tidbit"? As I laid the two feedshaft collars next to each other to take a photo, I saw something very interesting.





    Can you see it? Look closer and if you see it post the answer!
    One grub screw is painted red inside and the other is painted green inside.
    Last edited by Spiceman; 2020/05/25 at 07:50 AM.
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The grubscrews are painted port and starboard. Whats that wormscrew thing do. Is it where the thread dial normally would be . Whats the front look like. Some colchesters have a threading dial that is automatically kicks out . Its called an ainjest . I found this out on another forum when I asked about your colchester. But that doesnt look bulky enough .

    I see why I struggle with my projects. I cant do maths.
    Last edited by plunger; 2020/05/25 at 09:22 AM.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Before I start restoring, I wanted to understand why the headstock was filled with grease and why at high speed it was so noisy. Maybe something expensive needs to be replaced which will make this whole exercise fruitless and not worth the money.

    So ... bring it on grease monkey.

    First step normally is to remove the side cover. Check. Did that a few days back and battled to get it off as the standoffs it is fastened to are bent. Remember it is cast something so no hammering!

    Then onto removing the drive belts. These must be a matched set. The belts are the same size, but that does not help anything in this type of installation.








    I could not find any markings stating that the two V-belts are a matched pair so that explains the vibration in the drive train. In non-matched pairs one belt is always longer than the other and will hunt will turning causing a vibration. For this reason I always use Nu-T belts. A lot more expensive but lasts forever and does not care about the condition of the pulley's groove.





    OK, this is turning into a nightmare ... the belts cannot be replaces without removing the drive pulley ...





    This means I need to get to the electrical motor and get that slacked off and then remove the drive pulley. First step is to move the lathe away from the wall. Now ... because I threw or gave away all my odds and ends with the planned move to NZ, this included my roller set. OK, I managed to find three short pieces of 3/4" pipes and with two wedges and a crowbar I managed to move the lathe enough so that I could get to the electrical motor.





    Now for the motor experience ...
    I had no idea belts came in matched sets. Or that a Colchester was so complex, or could be so thoroughly messed up. They were too expensive when I wanted a small lathe , which is just as well. I don't have these skll levels. I bought a semi antique ML 4 Myford instead

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by fannerpaulgraham View Post
    I had no idea belts came in matched sets. Or that a Colchester was so complex, or could be so thoroughly messed up. They were too expensive when I wanted a small lathe , which is just as well. I don't have these skll levels. I bought a semi antique ML 4 Myford instead
    Nor did I . Google makes you clever. Apparently you are sopposed to put a chalk line on both belts and start it. If the chalk lines dont match when stopped they are not balanced. So then you must buy a dozen belts and choose the best out of the dozen you try.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Nor did I . Google makes you clever. Apparently you are sopposed to put a chalk line on both belts and start it. If the chalk lines dont match when stopped they are not balanced. So then you must buy a dozen belts and choose the best out of the dozen you try.
    No, you buy a matched set. If your pulleys are seven grooved, you buy a matched set of seven belts. If two grooves, then two belts. These belts are made to precise length and matched under tension.

    Next time go to an engineering supplier and ask for a matched set of belts. Otherwise do as I do and just buy Nu-T Link belting and make your own belt up. If it breaks, simply replace the broken links.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    The grubscrews are painted port and starboard. Whats that wormscrew thing do. Is it where the thread dial normally would be . Whats the front look like. Some colchesters have a threading dial that is automatically kicks out . Its called an ainjest . I found this out on another forum when I asked about your colchester. But that doesnt look bulky enough .

    I see why I struggle with my projects. I cant do maths.
    The tread dial indicator on this lathe sits on the left hand side of the carriage. Also unheard of ...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The wormbox has a few functions. I found an unknown of manual on a google drive which best describes the function of the wormbox.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    So jy het 'n Frakenstein beet daar.
    Last edited by ViperR; 2020/05/25 at 11:34 AM.
    4.0 XJ Jeep Cherokee - Go anywhere
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by ViperR View Post
    So jy het 'n Frakenstein beet daar.
    Ag nee wat, ek dink sy maar soos enige vrou ... as jy haar verwaarloos gaan sy jou hap.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    No, you buy a matched set. If your pulleys are seven grooved, you buy a matched set of seven belts. If two grooves, then two belts. These belts are made to precise length and matched under tension.

    Next time go to an engineering supplier and ask for a matched set of belts. Otherwise do as I do and just buy Nu-T Link belting and make your own belt up. If it breaks, simply replace the broken links.
    My comment refers to if you cant get a matched set.This is from www.Lathes.co .uk .An amazing site for info.


    . Mounted on a large adjustable plate inside the headstock end of the stand, the motor pulley was arranged to take either a wide flat belt or double V-belts. Although efficient, the twin V-belt drive can cause problems and, should the geared headstock on any V-belt drive Colchester make a knocking, rattling or rumbling sound, the cause may not be worn gears or bearings but unequal-length drive belts "fighting" each other. To check, try running on one belt to see if the headstock runs more smoothly; if it does, fit a second belt, run a chalk line across the two, start the machine for a few seconds and check that the belts are still in line; it's almost certain that they will not. Should it prove impossible to buy a pair of genuine "matched" belts, either buy a dozen standard ones (and find the two closest in length) or, even better, use a modern T-link belts. A further point on V-belt drives (and relevant to all applications) is the effect of belts with sections worn thin: as the worn sections fall into the pulleys and the thicker sections ride up them this effectively varies the gear ratio and causes the drive to speed up and slow down.



    How much wear do you have in critical things like the topslide ,cross slide and quill etc.?

    Ive done a lathe to the point of grinding the bed and putting engineering material under the carriage. This was done by the biggest crook Ive ever come across . Its still a project. I will tell you my unpleasant experience if interested. I hope you dont have to go this route. Mine was a chinese lathe, yours has some pedigree.
    Last edited by plunger; 2020/05/25 at 12:50 PM.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    My comment refers to if you cant get a matched set.This is from www.Lathes.co .uk .An amazing site for info.


    . Mounted on a large adjustable plate inside the headstock end of the stand, the motor pulley was arranged to take either a wide flat belt or double V-belts. Although efficient, the twin V-belt drive can cause problems and, should the geared headstock on any V-belt drive Colchester make a knocking, rattling or rumbling sound, the cause may not be worn gears or bearings but unequal-length drive belts "fighting" each other. To check, try running on one belt to see if the headstock runs more smoothly; if it does, fit a second belt, run a chalk line across the two, start the machine for a few seconds and check that the belts are still in line; it's almost certain that they will not. Should it prove impossible to buy a pair of genuine "matched" belts, either buy a dozen standard ones (and find the two closest in length) or, even better, use a modern T-link belts. A further point on V-belt drives (and relevant to all applications) is the effect of belts with sections worn thin: as the worn sections fall into the pulleys and the thicker sections ride up them this effectively varies the gear ratio and causes the drive to speed up and slow down.



    How much wear do you have in critical things like the topslide ,cross slide and quill etc.?

    Ive done a lathe to the point of grinding the bed and putting engineering material under the carriage. This was done by the biggest crook Ive ever come across . Its still a project. I will tell you my unpleasant experience if interested. I hope you dont have to go this route. Mine was a chinese lathe, yours has some pedigree.
    Yep, the chalk or a dot of paint on each belt is how I learned to test when I was 18 years old. I have not come across the need to buy more than a matched set. Even in the smallest of town, the Kooperasie oom will only sell you a matched set if you say it is for a multi-groove pulley. Maybe in the cities where no industries are common, you can step in to the hole of not buying matched sets. The last matches set I bought had lettering in yellow on it stating the matching serial number.

    I have not measured any wear. Simply because the lathe has really not been levelled correctly as I do not have an engineering level. I finally got one as part of a bulk purchase of tools I have done.

    I most probably will have to go the Turcite (or Multifil of Roulon) route on the apron and cross slide and maybe the sole of the tailstock. Will see ... I wanted to measure the saddle the weekend and because the weather was so nice outside, decided to spend some time on the water purification project.

    If you look at Vintage Machinery there is a whole series of videos on how Keith restores his Monarch lathe. Of importance to me is where he installs the Turcite and scrape it. It starts at Part 13. You can easily do it yourself if someone can mill down the worn faces.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Yep, the chalk or a dot of paint on each belt is how I learned to test when I was 18 years old. I have not come across the need to buy more than a matched set. Even in the smallest of town, the Kooperasie oom will only sell you a matched set if you say it is for a multi-groove pulley. Maybe in the cities where no industries are common, you can step in to the hole of not buying matched sets. The last matches set I bought had lettering in yellow on it stating the matching serial number.

    I have not measured any wear. Simply because the lathe has really not been levelled correctly as I do not have an engineering level. I finally got one as part of a bulk purchase of tools I have done.

    I most probably will have to go the Turcite (or Multifil of Roulon) route on the apron and cross slide and maybe the sole of the tailstock. Will see ... I wanted to measure the saddle the weekend and because the weather was so nice outside, decided to spend some time on the water purification project.

    If you look at Vintage Machinery there is a whole series of videos on how Keith restores his Monarch lathe. Of importance to me is where he installs the Turcite and scrape it. It starts at Part 13. You can easily do it yourself if someone can mill down the worn faces.
    Often just moving the carriage from the headstock to the tailstock with the carriage clamp snugged can give you an indication if you have excessive wear or not. If the gib plates bind you may have some wear..
    I also dont have an engineering level or any true measuring equipment like a surface plate.I dropped my lathe off with some guy who promised it would take three weeks to do my lathe.
    Six months later I had to forcibly fetch my lathe in pieces and still pay a grand extra.I still have to scrape the topslide and crosslide in but the biggest ctch is making a new tapered gib strip.I have turcite under mine but if he machined the pockets correctly is something I still need to check. Otherwise the leadscrew will not be true to the half nuts.

    This guy did a lathe of six meters for a company in Nelspruit. I found out later that because his planer/grinder was to small for a six meter bed he did half of it and then turned the lathe around and did the other half and blended it in by polishing. They couldnt work out why they couldnt get an accurate cut.
    I think it would need some considerable wear to warrant a grind. You can get alot done on a worn lathe.

    My other lathe (I have three )is an EMCO MAXIMAT V!13. Its always cut a taper but I dont have a accurate level to work with.I tried levelling it but I spent hours and I suspect I would actually have to rawl bolt it to the floor to get the twist out. It cuts 0.05mm over a hundred mm.You have to know how to work with it.

    I dont want to loosen the headstock because it would be futile untill I get the bed twist out.

    I am still on the hunt for a level,scraper and some accurate straight edges.Then I will tackle my chinese lathe. Ive already scraped the tailstock in.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Guys, please stick to English
    We can't change the wind but we can set our sails

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