1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 17





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  1. #321
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    The guy in the video restoring his hand wheels had it wrong. It is not four hours per wheel. It is four hours per side ....

    So yeah, not a lot to show today except really filthy carbonated hands. OK, OK, I know you are now thinking of champers, beer and such. I am talking about black carbon ...

    Let the movie begin ...
















    And that was three hours of work. Then onto polishing on the buffing wheel.

    First buffing with the white compund, Aluminium Oxide





    Then a final buff with the green compound. No, I cannot remember what the heck it is.






    And that was four hours.

    Onto masking the wheel out for painting.







    Then onto slide hammering the masking tape to get the edges done.









    And a final wrap with some cheap masking tape to protect the edge. Wonderful carbonated hands ... I think when I go and do domestic house cleaning tonight it will clean my hands as well ...





    Tomorrow, the weather should be good and I can finally spray. I will also do a video of the second wheel's cleaning. Till then, happy
    I have to say: Bliksem. Sorry.
    After finishing you probably wouldn't want to use it. It will look like a show piece.
    Respect!!!
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    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  2. #322
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Brilliant!

    Works for me, the search for "excellence".
    It would work in it's un-polished state, but you turned it into a thing of beauty.

    "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity" - Martin Luther king Jr

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  3. #323
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Thanks guys, much appreciated.

  4. #324
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Duplicate
    Last edited by 4eTouareg; 2020/07/03 at 05:02 PM.
    "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity" - Martin Luther king Jr

    2006 VW Touareg V10 TDi
    (currently done more than 407 000 km)

  5. #325
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Let the movie begin
    If I squint my eyes and scroll the whole series of photos real quick, you can actually see the wheel sort of keeping still, become shinier all the time, the sandpaper grade flicking over from coarse to fine, and BOOM, in the end, the wheel is masked with a final rush of speed. Well done Walt! (Disney) ;0

  6. #326
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by EtienneB View Post
    If I squint my eyes and scroll the whole series of photos real quick, you can actually see the wheel sort of keeping still, become shinier all the time, the sandpaper grade flicking over from coarse to fine, and BOOM, in the end, the wheel is masked with a final rush of speed. Well done Walt! (Disney) ;0
    I will do that slowmo in the video!

  7. #327
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I was real lazy this morning. Two nights in a row of gardening and doing domestic cleaning and getting paid on the Dop stelsel, does take its toll.

    So after a nice brunch I tackled cleaning the garage to get it ready for spraying. It was a lovely morning and I would rather have been on the beach ...

    Last night I asked the owner of the house we cleaned if he does not perhaps have some red Rustoleum paint. Low and behold he just finished spraying his daughter's doll house and had some left over! The can became part of payment ...

    First thing done this morning was to spray the headstock oil filler nut's plaque a bright red.





    In 48 hours I will give it another coating and then wait another 48 hours before I give it the blue inner coating.

    All the parts set out and hung. Cleaned with Parco cleaner and then wiped down with a lint free rag soaked in thinners. Ready for some spraying of yellow strontium etching primer.







    A quick fast forward and there we are!









    Then onto waiting four hours before I could apply the MS primer coating. Fast forward again and all done.











    The mess of my painting mix area ... looks like the Boss' studio!





    Waiting for paint to dry is interesting. You get some time to make plans. Here is the first part of a small project I need to do tomorrow.





    And with that I will leave you to have a brilliant Saturday evening.

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  9. #328
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Mygoggie, we're you in any way tempted to open up the electric motor. I might have missed your musings on that earlier but can't recall reading you say anything.

  10. #329
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by B Murr View Post
    Mygoggie, we're you in any way tempted to open up the electric motor. I might have missed your musings on that earlier but can't recall reading you say anything.
    Yes, I was. However the bearings are still very good so I have no need to do much except clean it now. I will open the end caps and clean it out to ensure there is no sand or gunk in the motor.

  11. #330
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Onto using the fibreglass channel ...

    I need a clamp for my smartphone so as to mount it on a tripod. I can buy one that will maybe work and will take forever to get here or I can make one.

    I therefore set out to make two clamps. The first step was to measure the width require so as to not interfere with the phone's side buttons. Looks like 60mm or what do you say?





    Measure out and lines scribed.






    Onto cutting with a diamond wheel on the cut-off machine.





    There we are ... two clamp bodies waiting to start working!





    This plate must fit onto the clamp. Note the pin to the one side of the central mounting screw.





    Measured out and pilot holes drilled.





    The hole for the pin drilled.





    Then it was onto finding the correct tap to match the thread of the mounting screw. Mrs Google says it is a 1/4"-20 UNC thread. Fortunately I have bought the million gazillion model building tools. In this lot was quite a few drawers of taps and dies. In this one I found the correct tap set.





    The tap works fine in my old camera's mounting hole!





    The drill bit size for the 1/4" tap is a #7. And there it is!





    Since I do not have access to a lathe at the moment, I could not turn a bush to fit into the fibreglass clamp. From previous projects I know that the fibreglass can take a thread very well if you are careful when tapping, so this is the option I went for. There we are. Looking fine and working quite well.







    Next was to make a wooden slot for the bottom in which the phone can fit. I used a piece of scrap meranti to make this from. Planed, routered, cut to height and then varnished.













    What a mess, the workbench was at this stage!




    And then my phone's storage space was full without me realising it! So all the next photos are somewhere in space time ...

    Oh well, let me revert to writing then. For the top I used a small wooden plate with a groove, swiveling in place at the back from two cap screws. You can see the little wooden plate to the right hand of the blue handled chisel in the above photo. A larger cap screw then screws down through another hole drilled and tapped in the top flange of the clamp and forces the little wooden plate downwards. This plate then puts pressure on the phone keeping it in place clamped between the two grooves.

    Here you can see the complete clamp.







    It works great and I am happy. Once I have the lathe up and running I will see if I want to make two bushes for the threaded holes. Now I can start filming!

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  13. #331
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Today was spent doing preparation work. I started off with giving the headstock oil filler nut's plaque a second coat.






    What junk paint this is ... I did wait 48 hours ...






    So I cleaned it again and sprayed it again. Me, not impressed ...

    Next step was to start repairs of the switch handle which I broke. As advised, I coated the porous surfaces with the superglue.







    Alas, after the glue has dried, the parts do not fit together. It appears the glue has bridged the sharp edges. So I will have to grind the glue back.

    Carl started sanding all the primed parts so that I can start spray painting these.





    The back plate received its first layer of hard wearing epoxy.





    After cleaning the gun and discovering that my 2K clear coat is disappeared, I postponed painting the "to be orange" parts. Onto trying my hand at doing the impossible. The rough black finish of the electrical switchgear panel.

    I have given this a lot of thought and decided to do the impossible my way. I bought some black etching primer to match the original paint. Setting the air pressure to very high and the paint volume to as little as possible things started to come together. First coats looked good.











    Final coat matches the original finish well enough in my opinion to pass.







    This method makes a lot of cobwebs and bridged the corners. I think I need to reduce the air pressure slightly.





    The lettering were all bridged by the paint. I need to figure out what to do here. In hindsight the front should be as smooth as possible to wipe any oil clean. I think I will wire brush the face clean again and I think then spray normal coatings. I also need to fill the two holes in the middle of the panel before spraying. So we learn, so we learn!





    Tomorrow I will buy the 2K clear coat and the signal red (RAL 3001) 2K or the internal areas. I will also try and get a small volume of Glyptal to do the inside faces of the gearbox and headstock.

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  15. #332
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The morning was shopping time

    I spent more than an hour buying two tins of 2K MS primer and the last 2K thinners container at the paint shop. Seems like many people are sick with Antie Corona and large stock deficits exists.

    I then went to the art shop to buy some masking fluid to mask out the areas not to be painted on all the plaques. A job for when the heavy weather forecasted arrives.





    After a quick tour through a number of shops and then some coffee at my friend's coffee shop, I felt a bit better...

    I also received a call last night from another friend who owns Rimrite (they fix rims). He is sponsoring quite a few tins of paint and hardener. Basically all I need to complete the painting of the lathe. My last stop of the day in town was to collect the paint. Big was my surprise when I saw the quality and quantity of the stash! That is a LOT of money standing here. Thanks Cronjé ! So if you want a rim fixed, he is your man!





    This afternoon I had two hours to kill ... interesting concept. How to you kill an hour? Does it run pass you and you shoot from the hip with your time distortion ray gun?

    I have given the repairs of the holes in the headstock and gearbox lid (OK side panel) a lot of thought. My biggest concern was the holes that were not drilled through. I was leaning towards reaming these out or scaring the inside to allow some friction to be created when I install the rivets. Standing looking at the gearbox side panel, it dawned on me that I do not have to use rivets. I can thread the holes and screw a machine screw in there and once in place, rivet the ends into the countersunk recesses.

    I found the ideal soft iron screws that already had countersunk heads. The diameter of 5mm is thread the holes and allow the screws to be locked in place. First step was to clean the countersunk portions of the holes.








    Then onto drilling the holes to size. According to Mrs Google or Mr Duck Duck Go, the drill size for a 5mm tap is 4,3mm. I did not have that size but I do have an 11/64" drill bit which is as close to 4,3mm as you will get.






    First hole tapped and screw inserted for testing.





    It was protruding on the other side so I cut it down to size ...







    All four holes drilled, threaded and screws installed for testing.











    My idea is to lock the machine screws in place with epoxy and once cured rivet the inner exposed ends and grind the heads down. So first step was to clean the holes with some Sika Cleaner-205 soaked into earbutts. This cleaner is magic stuff!







    Then I mixed some Sikadur-AP two part epoxy and coated the inner faces of the holes as well as the thread of the screws.







    Can you see the epoxy in the holes? Neither can I





    Then I screwed the screws in and torqued them a bit.





    Onto cleaning the inside of the holes and protruding with a water soaked rag. I do not want any of the epoxy remaining when I start riveting.





    There we are. Now these must be left alone to cure over the next few hours. Nothing like a good night's rest to cure epoxy!





  16. #333
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I had some epoxy left over and then I remembered .... the two little holes that someone (guess who?) drilled. Hint:- His name starts with a B which is repeated.

    Yes, the two holes in the switchgear panel that was drilled to directly mount the contactor on the inside of the panel with self taping screws.

    I wire brushed the new paint away from the two holes.





    Filled the holes with some of the epoxy and leveled it off to a slightly raised surface.





    There we are. The handiwork of the afternoon.






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  18. #334
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    A bit of a "shut the door after the horse bolts" case, but I recommend A4 Metalset for sticking things together.
    Cheers,
    John Kilfoil

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  19. #335
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    This morning was COLD for us. A full 7°C which is unheard of!

    The garage was even colder as it has this aptitude of making a fridge of itself ... I therefore decided to postpone my spray painting until the day has heated up a bit. I therefore tackled the switchgear panel.

    Not many photos this time as most of the time the phone was on video. Yeah, I am making videos.

    I cleaned all the paint from the lettering with a wire brush on the Dremel tool and then took out the dentist drill bits. Time to get that smoothing whining skull penetrating sound reverberating through the garage!





    I even removed some 50 year old casting sand from between the letters! Looking much better now. I just need to figure out how to do the lettering and the paint effect.





    By this time the temperature has risen enough so that I could remove my jersey. That is always a sign that you can spray paint now.

    Today was the day of the Dutch. All orange.

    Parts set out and ready for spraying.





    My first time ever spraying 2K base and then clear coat. Not perfect but good enough for an electrical motor and electrical equipment.









    After the two hours it took to do this, I cleaned the gun and had some time before lunch to kill. This time I was ready and I could draw my time warping ray gun quick enough!

    I asked Carl to sand the back splash panel and clean it for me while I was doing the Dutchy orange thing. Here he is blowing the last bit of moisture away.





    Then it was my turn to spray it another thick coat of self leveling epoxy.





    After four hours you can see the surface is a lot smoother. Great!





    After lunch it was onto sanding the stand and masking it off. Tomorrow I want to do the inner British thing. Inner red. Carl set out sanding the stand and then masking it off. It is a real big job as there are a never ending number of edges where the inner red meets the outer green. Jumping ahead in time here is how far he got today.





    While he was sanding and masking, I tackled the gearbox side panel. The lid. The side lid that is.

    I peened the two screws on the inside of the panel.





    Then I used a grinding bit on the Dremel tool to shape and smooth the ends down. Final touch with a small drum sander on the Dremel tool.







    The external heads were patiently waiting their turn. I sanded these down with a flap disk in the small angle grinder. Yes, I did take turns on each one, moving to the next when the screw being sanded became hot. Here we are. No heads and flush with the surface. I also sanded the poorly finished welding repair a bit so that it is a much better finish.











    With that done, it was onto fixing the mounting holes for the plaque. The one was too large and I knew I had to install a screw there as well. Travel the well trodden screwed road.

    I first wanted to use 2,5mm machine screws to screw the plaque down but all the holes were too big for these tiny screws.




    Calculating backwards from the existing 2,5mm diameter holes I found that I have to use 3mm machines screws. I however have cheese head cap screws which will look much better! Look how cheesy they look.





    Checking the larger hole diameter against tap drill sizes, I found that installing a 4mm bolt would be the perfect solution. In my ice cream holder full of small bolts I found what I was looking for. A soft steel machine screw.









    The drill size of 3,4mm I once again I did not have in my arsenal, but a 1/8" drill is close enough for this purpose.





    Drilled, tapped, cleaned, epoxied and installed!





    I tapped the three other holes to 3mm, but alas the one hole was a tad too large and the cap screw did not want to tighten to torque. So I installed the other two cap screws while I asked Brain to come up with a solution.





    Brain said: "It is simple. Bring me coffee!" OK, coffee break it is.

    After sitting in the sun, Brain came up with a plan. Install another 4mm machine screw as you did a short little time in the past. And that is what I did.





    Tomorrow, while I will be watching the British paint drying I will cut the two 4mm screw heads off, sand these down to height, peen them a tiny bit to get a smooth interface with the surface and then drill and tap for the two 3mm cap screws.

    This was a LONG day and I must say we made some real visible progress for a change!
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/07/08 at 07:28 PM.

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  21. #336
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnoK View Post
    A bit of a "shut the door after the horse bolts" case, but I recommend A4 Metalset for sticking things together.
    The Sika products are as good and the AP I have used has proven itself in construction time and again. We normally use it to cement aluminium to concrete where we do not want to drill holes.

    Thanks for the head's up. I will take note!

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  23. #337
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    We normally use it to cement aluminium to concrete where we do not want to drill holes.
    In that case, I think it will be adequate....
    Cheers,
    John Kilfoil

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  24. #338
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnoK View Post
    A bit of a "shut the door after the horse bolts" case, but I recommend A4 Metalset for sticking things together.
    I was going to say that smooth on makes good stuff but you need to sit down when you get a price.Why bother for a machine screw ,just use locktite .Its probably better suited and much easier.

    But then a 50ml bottle only costs about 450 bucks

  25. #339
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Well, well, the day turned out completely different to what I envisaged.

    I was busy taping up the stand when I reached a river with a bridge to cross or not. The door and the drawer. There is simply no way that these can be covered effectively and still allow half a decent job of spray painting.

    As I was pondering on what to do, there was a knock on the door. There stood my friend that knows all about spray painting. He was in the area and wanted to see how I am progressing.

    He gave me a few lessons and recommendations to improve the Dutch job. I will do such after I have cleaned the motor as I will damage the paint job. As part of the touch up job I can just as well redo the clear coat layer as he recommended. All due to being sold the incorrect 2K thinners. So we learn, so we learn.

    We then discussed the drawer and door issue and he agreed that I should remove the bridge. So, onto cutting the hinges loose ...

    The door has two hinges welded to the body.







    The drawer only one! What a bad design ... no wonder it was always moving vertically a lot.





    I spent a few minutes with a thin cutting blade on the small grinder and the door was loose.







    A little bit longer for the drawer, but she turned loose as well ... nothing more dangerous than a loose drawer!





    Replacing the cutting blade with a flap disk I sanded the welded areas on the stand smooth. No photos, but some good videos of sparks flying. You will have to wait for the sparky fun we had.

    Then it was time for coffee. And planning and another sip of Ethiopian.

    Carl and I decided to tackle the hinges and getting these all smoothed and looking good again.








    The inside of the drawer handle opening had a weld that remained as I could not get to it with the stand lying upside down. That was promptly sanded away.






    The door and the drawer were also addressed by the panel beater hammer. Nothing like seeing a crooked door turned straight ...

    With the body work done, I tackled the electrical drive motor. I was concerned that sand was to be found inside the motor. Cutting through the new paint on the joint between the body and the end caps took a while.





    Then I tried to get the end caps off. No way ... they were very happy to remain stuck in their location. Onto getting the puller out.

    Finally the one end came off.





    Other end cap removed.






    "Not much sand" was the words of Sandkriek ...





    The bearings were STUCK solid to the spindle. The grease was black and both bearings were worn. The one tried to imitate a song about something going clickety clack in the dark ... Hmmm, this makes for a good entry to a movie.

    Onto Mr Godzilla puller ...





    Nope, said bearing, I am staying here. This is my territory. OK, then we will use a show of force, or as we call it in Afrikaans, "geweld". With "geweld" you can achieve anything.





    See, geweld cures all problems.





    That sure is ooooooooold grease ... I ordered two new bearings and Carl cleaned the motor insides and the rotor of all sand, grease and any hidden bugs and germs and dark lurking things.

    And then it was garage cleaning time.

    ... and very good news time


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  27. #340
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Good news time.

    While my friend was here, he received a message. BASF will sponsor the paintwork of the lathe. They have read the thread and wanted to support the project!

    I will surely put their name everywhere and also on the backplate of the lathe where all the sponsors will be listed.

    Thanks again BASF! So very munch appreciated.


    In addition I received another message around noon, that someone part sponsored a R8k audio interface. I only have to pay R2,8k for the brand new unit! This will allow me to start putting audio to the videos and loading these onto the channel. I was so looking for a quality audio interface and this Zoom UAC-2 is much more than I ever expected. I am really thankful.




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