1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 15





View Poll Results: Must mygoggie start making videos of all his projects?

Voters
13. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I love it!

    11 84.62%
  • Nope, its a silly idea.

    2 15.38%
Page 15 of 28 FirstFirst ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ... LastLast
Results 281 to 300 of 554
  1. #281
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The day did not start as I wanted. So as usual I had to adjust to the curved ball, do a skew tripple backflip and one pinky handstand to catch it.

    Where I wanted to spray the stand today, Carl and I ended up cleaning and masking all the parts that must be sprayed. The only item not touched is the bed.

    Between masking, I hanged all the parts in place where they will be hung to dry after being sprayed.










    When I hung the side cover I noticed something weird.





    No, not the fact that it is not plated. Yes, it is aluminium and more importantly ...









    It has been repaired after getting a serious hit. This confirms my theory that the lathe was damaged and repaired as I suspected when I was cleaning the holes on the gearbox side cover.

    Just for interest sake, here is the serial number of the side cover stamped into it.





    Obviously someone removed the smaller British supplier's name plaque and installed the larger South African supplier's name plaque. There are two sets of holes, the larger being those required by the South African name plaque. No, I have no idea what the other holes were for. Maybe to spy on the change gears?





    I also spent some time to clean the external of the headstock and masking it off. I cut some cardboard inserts for the spindle bearings openings to protect the bearings.





    A trick I use to do this easily is to smear the machined face with some oil.







    Then take some cardboard and press it against the oiled face.






    And presto, you have your cutting line!






    Carefull cutting gives you a press fit insert.









    Repeat for the other three openings.







    And onto masking off the inside.





    While Carl was masking off the covers, lids and panels I started cleaning the stand. By the end of the day, everything was masked, the stand vacuumed and waiting on a final clean with a wire brush.

    An early start is required tomorrow to catch up time lost today. All in all, it was a good day. Be flexible these days and all will be good!

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  3. #282
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    This morning was supposed to be a spray painting morning. Windguru said to look out for a beautiful wind free morning. I woke up with gusting storm winds ... not good ...

    Oh well, "be flexible and make a plan" is my motto these days, so I decided to double check everything and start final cleaning. I took my time and worked through all the lathe parts. I wire brushed all the bare metals items again, masked some more items, vacuumed everything and the whole floor, wiped everything down with thinners and then had some Jamaican juice.

    After some Brain energy I started reading on how to use the Parco cleaner and the correct way to spray the strontium chrome etching primer. I could not find anything useful so I asked a friend. After a few valuable telephonic lessons, I was on my way.

    I washed all the parts with the Parco cleaner (as is from the bottle) until no parts were sticky anymore. This took quite a while but at long last everything was ready to be spray painted.






    I arranged the parts to be more accessible and ensured I had some walking room between all the hanging parts and the mobile workbenches.





    And there we were ... all ready for spraying to commence.





    Alas, the wind was still blowing strongly. So I decided to do the lunch thing with the Boss and tackle the work after such delicious endeavors.

    After the food thingy, I sprayed the floor with misted water from a portable decanting device via a pressurised water dispensing tube outfitted with a water misting nozzle.

    Assembling the cleaned spray gun, it leaked air ... tools do not want to stand idle! I spent about an hour to finally discover an O-ring is missing. Fortunately I bought the million gazillion model building stuff, and I knew amongst these were a lot of O-rings. I dug around a bit and low and behold found the correct size O-ring. Spray gun ready, etching primer ready, compressor drained of condensation (which by the way is about 1 liter per day over here), measuring cup (check), rags and thinners (check), stirring device (check), screwdriver (check). All good!

    So onto spraying. The strontium etching primer must just be misted on. Well I have not misted with a spray gun the last few years, so it took some adjustment to get the spray from the gun more or less correct.





    Halfway through painting the stand, I realised there is one unchecked item. My mask!!

    I could not open the doors for ventilation due to the wind and the fumes suddenly reminded to check the unchecked. Anyway onto spraying and after three hours all was done.

























    I was a bit worried that I did not cover the stand enough, but my friend warned me. This is only a binding layer and you need to stop just when you want to cover the surface some more. He was right. After about four hours of curing and a braai, the coverage showed to be a lot more than what it appeared to be just after spraying.









    I am happy with the finish. It is smooth and all areas are covered so as to be just transparent.

    Time for a good night's rest and sweet dreams.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  5. #283
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Vereeniging
    Age
    57
    Posts
    160
    Thanked: 105

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    This will go down in history is THE most detailed resto project for this kind of equipment. Your attention to detail is S T A G G E R I N G ! Your benefit in 2020 is that you can gather info from those before you and work it into this project. It seems that we might be thinking the same (goal)thing when something is restored: Never work on it again. Excluding of course normal maintenance.

  6. #284
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by EtienneB View Post
    This will go down in history is THE most detailed resto project for this kind of equipment. Your attention to detail is S T A G G E R I N G ! Your benefit in 2020 is that you can gather info from those before you and work it into this project. It seems that we might be thinking the same (goal)thing when something is restored: Never work on it again. Excluding of course normal maintenance.
    Thanks @EtiennieB for your positive and supportive comments! Yes, I am a firm believer that you should restore so that the machine is as good as new or better. If you do not follow this route, you will find yourself on the ever downward spiraling maintenance road.

  7. #285
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    JHB
    Age
    66
    Posts
    931
    Thanked: 145

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Had to Google strontium primer
    Interesting stuff
    Thanks for drawing our attention to it

  8. #286
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Woolf View Post
    Had to Google strontium primer
    Interesting stuff
    Thanks for drawing our attention to it
    Yep, it is the only etching primer I could find that can be applied to surfaces that were in contact with oil before. The specific product I used is MILSPEC so it is very good.

    Today is onto doing all the lathe bed and motor cleaning.

  9. #287
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The morning was spent building the water purification sand filter's right hand chamber filter.

    I also received a message that the lockout lever and its bolt as well as the ON/OFF lever arm is ready for collection. Brian sure is quick with his lathe!!

    The remainder of the day Carl and myself spent on getting the lathe bed ready to be sand blasted. First step was to clean all the ways and machined areas with a thinners soak cloth.

    Then onto masking these out with the 3M blue masking tape.





    Then to protect the blue masking tape from the sand blasting I covered the blue tape with some common garden species masking tape.








    And done ....





    I also hunted down the 2K primer tins where they were hiding in storage. The 2K primer will be sprayed over the yellow strontium etching primer as the first primer layer.





    For the areas that will be required to look good, I will spray a layer of 2K MS Superfiller primer.





    On this layer we will the play with the self leveling body filler and get it so smooth as a Ol' Shaken Steven's hair.

    A final layer of 2K MS primer will cover this playing field and be made ready for the final green top coat. At least that is the plan!



    I also had some time to remove the manufacturer's plaque on the coolant pump and clean it. Do not fret, I did remove all the paint from the plaque before spraying it!





    And sprayed black. The one who can spot it win a weekend for two at the Klipplaat railway station.





    Tomorrow is going to be another long day, and the weather looks awful. I will see how and when and where I can do the spraying ...

    Wish me luck ...
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/25 at 08:07 PM.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  11. #288
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Never believe the weatherman ...

    Almost sounds like "Never pay the ferryman" ... bring it on Chris.

    I got up early and started cleaning the garage, vacuumed the floor, wiped all the parts to be sprayed, assembled the spray gun, got everything in place on the paint mixing bench and by 10h00 still no wind. Good, let me get cracking and painting.

    Two hours later, all the parts were done. The back splash plate will get an epoxy coating that is hard wearing so it was not be painted with the MS primer.

















    Then it was onto getting the lathe bed cleaned. We had to move it outside to start the fine sand blasting process. Here Carl is busy with the small gun blasting the gunk and other dark creepy things from the hidden cracks and crannies.





    I will continue with the process tomorrow as by this time the wind did start blowing at gale force and the wind chill index temperature dropped to less than 10C. So we decided to call it a day!

    It was a long day but a fruitful one.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  13. #289
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I was rather tired last night after all the work of the day. So it was an early venture to bed for me and Brain.

    I woke up with the wind howling around the house. Good, at least the weatherman was correct for this morning! I still had a few items to clean with sand blasting, so I decided to tackle the small items first.

    Here we have the electrical switchgear's face plate and the South African distributor's brass plaque. Can you spot the well camouflaged plate?





    Here it is revealed in its hidden place ...






    I stapled it to the wood to prevent it blowing away in the wind.

    After quite a few 15 minute periods, it is cleaned from all the old paint and gunk.





    Then onto the electrical face plate. I have cleaned the lettering somewhere in the past. I cannot remember when and my time traveling enthusiasm to check is at a rather low level, so leave the past in the past. If you know how to calculate time from shadow length you can work out how long this took to get cleaned up!








    And the last tiny bit.





    Done






    Onto the back side.






    Almost done, happy times!






    Done, the remaining bits in the casting holes can remain. They look quite serene in their little holes, so I am not too worried.





    And that was the activity over quite a few hours. I now feel like a sand monster and really a bit windblown.
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/27 at 02:30 PM.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  15. #290
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    486
    Thanked: 444

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    First of all. RESPECT. You have lots of guts.
    You said some time ago you picked up extra fine sand for the sand blasting exersize. Did you perhaps considered soda blasting? Not to damage the old cast iron parts.
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  16. #291
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    First of all. RESPECT. You have lots of guts.
    You said some time ago you picked up extra fine sand for the sand blasting exersize. Did you perhaps considered soda blasting? Not to damage the old cast iron parts.
    Thanks @Spiceman, munch appreciated ;-)

    Yep, I first tried soda blasting, but the paint is too hard for the soda to be effectively removed. So, the next step up from that is wind blown dune sand. It works a treat and best is the fact that it is for free.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  18. #292
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    57
    Posts
    159
    Thanked: 197

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Yip, Sardinia Bay dune has awesome clean sand for blasting. I collected 3 large 25kg chlorine buckets full a few weeks ago.

    Mygoggie, would it be possible to come and have a look at your project firsthand?
    Guy B. Vergoes Houwens
    2014 LC76 4.5 V8

  19. #293
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by ghouwens View Post
    Yip, Sardinia Bay dune has awesome clean sand for blasting. I collected 3 large 25kg chlorine buckets full a few weeks ago.

    Mygoggie, would it be possible to come and have a look at your project firsthand?
    Please phone my secretary and schedule an appointment. Viewing openings are severely limited due to popular demand!





    Yeah, you are most welcome.

  20. #294
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    57
    Posts
    159
    Thanked: 197

    Wink Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Please phone my secretary and schedule an appointment. Viewing openings are severely limited due to popular demand!





    Yeah, you are most welcome.
    Thanks. Will send you a PM.
    Guy B. Vergoes Houwens
    2014 LC76 4.5 V8

  21. #295
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Aaaaah, Sunday morning, sleep in time! Especially with a howling wind driving the cold and wet all over the show.

    I had a late start this morning, simply because I can. Who said you need to get up early every morning like a robot?

    I unhooked all the sprayed parts from the little wire hangers and sorted the parts by colour to be. I also checked each part for quality of my work. In the hazy conditions I did not spray the MS primer on one part and on two parts the coating is not adequate! Not good ... Fortunately I need to do a few additional parts and also the top side of the stand, so the mistakes can be rectified then.

    I then moved the mobile workbenches to one side so that I can get the Pajero back into its sleeping quarters. All the parts checked and moved together.





    The parts of the lamp that will be sprayed light machine grey.






    The electrical switchgear cabinet will be done in black. The old paint was a kind of fluffy raised surface that almost look like sandpaper with spikey points. Any idea what this paint is called? Of course yes, the drawer and cabinet's handle domes are here again. Maybe they want to be part of the party?






    The electrical components I will do in orange. The motor still needs to be sand blasted, so it is not in the picture.






    And not to let them feel inferior, a picture of all the faithful hookers.





    Onto the SA distributor's name plaque. I scrubbed it with some thinners to get rid of the stubborn paint remnants in the little corners.





    Then a wire brush with a brass cup brush in the Dremel tool. There are a few tiny spots with old paint, but I am not going to spend more time on this.






    Ready for painting. Laid onto a wooden board and two toothpicks to raise it from the board so that the paint will not run in between the plaque bottom and the wooden board and join the two together.





    And first coat done. The raised points of the background is causing low coverage. Is this intentional or will a second coat cover these as well? Who knows?





    I must really remember - 48 hours till second coat!


    Time to rest and start working on getting the videos organised. I must get used to setting up a camera, do something, move and setup the camera, do something, repeat et al ... crazy. This morning I was halfway through organizing the parts and only remembered then that I am suppose to shoot a video for you folks.

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


  23. #296
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    East London
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,432
    Thanked: 3097

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The old paint was a kind of fluffy raised surface that almost look like sandpaper with spikey points. Any idea what this paint is called?
    Crackle Paint?
    "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity" - Martin Luther king Jr

    2006 VW Touareg V10 TDi
    (currently done more than 407 000 km)

  24. #297
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eTouareg View Post
    Crackle Paint?
    Unfortunately it is not crackle paint. If you look at this photo you will see what I mean. It looks like sandpaper with spiky points.


  25. #298
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    486
    Thanked: 444

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Unfortunately it is not crackle paint. If you look at this photo you will see what I mean. It looks like sandpaper with spiky points.

    Was that the original paint? I would have thought a smooth paint would accumulate a lot less dust etc. Black sounds also like a bad colour choice wrt visibility etc.
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  26. #299
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    Was that the original paint? I would have thought a smooth paint would accumulate a lot less dust etc. Black sounds also like a bad colour choice wrt visibility etc.
    Yep, original single coat direct on aluminium. It must be some kind of etching primer that forms the little hills when drying. Or painted using a lot of air through the nozzle. I have never seen this before. As far as dust gathering goes it works great. It also does work great at grating your skin!

  27. #300
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    486
    Thanked: 444

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Yep, original single coat direct on aluminium. It must be some kind of etching primer that forms the little hills when drying. Or painted using a lot of air through the nozzle. I have never seen this before. As far as dust gathering goes it works great. It also does work great at grating your skin!
    I think sticking to originality also has its limits. Consider to maybe change this specific paint for something more practical.
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

Page 15 of 28 FirstFirst ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •