1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 13





View Poll Results: Must mygoggie start making videos of all his projects?

Voters
13. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I love it!

    11 84.62%
  • Nope, its a silly idea.

    2 15.38%
Page 13 of 28 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... LastLast
Results 241 to 260 of 554
  1. #241
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    And it was time to gather the harvest ...

    Almost true, but gather I did. All the parts I did not want to strip and clean, but which had to be derusted and plated, I gathered together.

    First was the electrical switchgear box.





    And off came the name plaque. I am a pro now!






    The drive side cover. It is cast steel, so I was a bit concerned, but the plating guy assured me he can do it.





    Plaques removed and a last cap screw to remove.





    So I loaded the lamp (most important!), the left hand drive side cover, the electrical panel box, the door, the back splash plate, the right hand side cover (not shown), the motor's fan cover, the motor mounting plate and shaft and I cannot remember what else into the car and off I went to the plater.


    In the meantime Carl tackled the headstock cover, the gearbox cover, the coolant pipe and the cut-off swith box.





    When I came back from the plater, I started stripping the tailstock.





    The hollow stud nut took a while to work loose as the last bit of thread was damaged and I could not get to the thread with any kind of file.





    And it came off and I could remove the clamp plate. Years of gunk lurking in there!





    Next was the base. Uncle Allen helped me out with one of his keys and I could undo the cap screw on each side of the tailstock's foot.







    More gunk and shavings and oily jucky stuff of years gone by gathered in there to discuss dark things ... sound familiar? Yeah, like honest politicians.






    Then it was onto removing the Morse taper live spindle. Fortunately in the bunch of model building stuff I bought I remembered seeing Morse taper wedges. I chose one and inserted it in the slot, grabbed the spindle, hit the wedge a firm blow and knocked it straight into my hand ... holy words followed ...





    After I have finished donating blood and had some "tea" with Carl, I removed the handwheel. Take note there is a washer lurking there!






    Next to come free was the screw.






    Do not loose this small part named the "Spindle Tee Key". It falls out and then darts off on its own. It can only be fitted one way, as I show here.








    And then I got stuck. In the tailstock is a bush held in place with a grub screw.






    I removed the grub screw and then no way Josť. The bush is stuck. I looked and looked like Lucky Look (who remembers him?) and in the end, it seems that the oiler was knocked down into the hole and is locking the bush in place. I decided this is another exercise for when Brain has rested a bit and formulated another plan!






    So I handed the tailstock body to the master cleaner for getting the paint removed.

    I then cleaned and polished the live spindle. The bearing feels like it needs some oil or grease. Alas I cannot find any way to disassemble it. There is no nut in the tail end, no locking mechanism on the spindle or any joint I can see. The only joint visible is where the live front part rotates relative to the body.

    If you know how to open the live spindle please let me know.

















    OK, maybe you had enough bling, but like I said, bring the bling! Let me know if you have any idea how the live spindle comes apart.

  2. #242
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Looking at those plaques I suspect they are cast.Those letters are quite pronounced and high. Can etching eat that deep.?
    It is not deep at all. Maybe 0,8mm max. So yes etching it is IMHO.

  3. #243
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Between Carl and myself we tackled the smaller items to clean.

    Here Carl just finished wire brushing and sanding the gap piece, the tailstock and the headstock swing arm.





    I decided to clean the door and drawer handle pins and polish these.






    After carefully studying the many old photos and brochures I found that the handle's back domes were painted a very dark colour, which I deduct could only be black. Make sense?

    Back of each dome primed.






    Next day, the front of each dome was primed.






    Sanded and second coat of primer sprayed on.






    Black layer went on after waiting 24h for the primer to set and cure completely.





    48 hours later I did the backside of each dome. I learned my lesson!!






    Carl in the meantime cleaned the apron half nut. Before







    And after. He brass wire brushed each groove and checked for damage. I was glad when he reported that he could not find any damage!








    By this time it was time to clean the work area. Cleaning is important if you do not want to loose your sanity. It also helps to find lost parts ...

    Always good to put some groovy music on whilst cleaning. Heyo, onto cleaning!

  4. #244
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Whilst cleaning, I found the one 1/4" ball we lost a while ago. It was stuck between two fire bricks!

    I also found another ball that we did not know was lost!


    Once the area was clean enough to eat some dinner from the floor, I started to sort out all the parts. I wanted to determine which parts must be painted and put these to one side. I hate spraying one or two components, clean the gun and repeat the process the next day. What a waste of time!

    The rest of the parts I sorted. Each component's parts go into zip lock bags with the part name and location written on the outside of the bag. Each lathe component has its own box and this box is filled with the labeled and sealed bags belonging to that component. For example the headstock box has only labeled bags with headstock parts in it. For large items I prefer to use old ice cream tubs. For that reason I need to eat a lot of ice cream each evening. It is important to have enough empty ice cream tubs each day!

    Here is the lathe stand with all the parts in the stack of boxes.





    All the parts and components that must be painted are on the workbenches.







    This process took most of the next day, but was time well spent as everything is sorted and easy to find. Carl sharpened the scrapers, cleaned all the tools, leads and machines and put these back in their places. I hate to work with dirty and blunt tools.

    A clean and ordered work space allows creative minds to work well.


  5. #245
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Thumbs up Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I have had various requests to get my backside in line and start doing all these projects of mine on video as well.

    So please give the poll at the top of this page ^^^ (yes, up there!) a vote so that I can motivate myself!

  6. #246
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    486
    Thanked: 444

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I don't see it
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  7. #247
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    I don't see it
    It should be at the very top of this page. Just below the 4x4 banner ...

  8. #248
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Disaster day. You know those days where anything you touch gets broken or turns into an utter disaster.

    I wanted to give the two handle domes a second coat of paint as it was really nice weather for spraying. I sat down and sanded the insides of the dome to smooth it down. Then I noticed a chip on the one edge and in the centre paint that puddled there and dried with wrinkles.

    I promptly sanded these out and washed and prepped the two domes.






    And then the show started. The one with the least damage decided to become a dust collector while I was spraying. I tried the trick where you over spray, remove the dust particle and move the wet paint around until it stops flowing. All I achieved was to create more dust trapped. So I need to sand this dome again and respray.

    The other dome I coated with a layer of primer and low and behold the primer dissolved the Rustoleum paint. I silently worded some obscure words on the holy Sunday but alas two did slip out.






    I will let the insides dry till tomorrow and then wire brush the insides clean and start from scratch. Third time lucky, hey Lucky Look? Who can remember the names of his horse and dog?

  9. #249
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    486
    Thanked: 444

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    It should be at the very top of this page. Just below the 4x4 banner ...
    I will try the pc. It seems that the Smart phone/tapatalk is not the ideal solution.
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  10. #250
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Klerksdorp
    Age
    75
    Posts
    5,240
    Thanked: 477

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Must mygoggie start making videos of all his projects?
    Yes, get on with it. Reassemble everything and start from scratch, detailing it all on video!


    -F_D
    Eric Skeen is the Family Dog
    White Fang:
    1999 2700i DC Raider 4x4
    Bull Dog: 1987 4Y-EFI 2200 DC 4x4
    Pra Dog: 1998 Prado VX 3.4 V6
    Hound Dog: 2000 2700i SC 4x4

  11. #251
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    486
    Thanked: 444

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Family_Dog View Post
    Yes, get on with it. Reassemble everything and start from scratch, detailing it all on video!


    -F_D
    It might be difficult to reinstall all the mug and grime although the grease will not be too difficult .
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  12. #252
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Vereeniging
    Age
    57
    Posts
    160
    Thanked: 105

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Jolly JumperRin Tin Can

  13. #253
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by EtienneB View Post
    Jolly JumperRin Tin Can
    Almost correct! Yes, the horse was called Jolly Jumper. Almost there with the dog's name ...

  14. #254
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Family_Dog View Post
    Yes, get on with it. Reassemble everything and start from scratch, detailing it all on video!


    -F_D
    Had a good laugh now. Yeah @Family_dog, as @Spiceman said ...

  15. #255
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Vereeniging
    Age
    57
    Posts
    160
    Thanked: 105

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Apologies. Rantanplan

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to EtienneB For This Useful Post:

    JJJ

  17. #256
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by EtienneB View Post
    Apologies. Rantanplan
    Yeah! Congrats. Rantanplan, the stupidest dog in the whole wide world. Wonder if in all of time?

  18. #257
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    This little handle decided to hide away!





    The leadscrew reverse handle needs to be painted so it should be with the other parts on the workbench! Not hiding away in a box.

    It is important to note that it has a leather washer that serves as an oil seal.





    As I will have to make a new one, I made a note of the seal's outside diameter which is 28.77mm or 11/8"as can be seen.





    All the parts of the handle were wire brushed till clean and the Bakelite knob polished.

    I also decided I wanted to bling the domed washer. Why? Because I can ...





    With all the parts sorted and located the stand is ready to be painted.






    Unfortunately the weather is not and with severe storm winds blowing 50+ knots there is no hope to achieve a sand and dust free environment. No, I do not have a spray booth with air quality control!

    So onto other smaller things to be done as well.

  19. #258
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Onto smaller and little tasks.

    The gearbox' lid, no, not the lid on top, the lid facing you when you work, needed some anti Brutish Butcher love and care. It has four pop-rivet and three hammer drive rivets remains stuck in the holes.





    If you look at the holes you will agree with me that the one hole with no adjacent small hammer drive rivet hole must be located over the earlier rivet hole.





    Looking closely at things and it was with a great sigh of relief that I found that the top two holes were drilled through the lid. OK, you win, the side cover. As was the original rivet holes! So, I tapped the remains of the pop-rivets and the hammer drive rivets out the other side.







    The hammer drive rivets used were fairly large as can be seen from the remains of the shank of one of the two I could tap out.





    Then it was time to tackle the other three holes. Using my well practiced trick of grinding a normal drill down to be a square flat end I could remove most of the pop-rivet remains. The rest of the pop-rivet ball in each hole I attacked with my stash of dentist drill bits and Dremel tool. After about four hours the two pop-rivet balls were completely removed.

    What a waste of time!

    And then it was time to remove the remains of the hammer drive rivet in the last hole. After about two hours and a number of dentist drill bits I managed to drill a small hole down the core of the rivet.





    As these rivets turn loose quite easily, I tapped a jeweller's screwdriver into the hole and applied some LH torque on the screwdriver to turn the rivet remainder loose. The screwdriver decided to simply snap ....

    If you thought these hammer drive rivets are hard, then you have not tried to drill or remove the remains of such a rivet in combination with a broken jeweller's screwdriver. Off I went ... onto drilling. You can see the stream of tiny metal drillings to the right of the drill bit.





    Eight hours of drilling I finally managed to remove the remains of the rivet and screwdriver.





    The soldiers who gave their lives to drive the evil ones from a hole ...






    And then it was time for coffee, a good dinner. Time for Brain to rest and for me to relax.

  20. #259
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    And a new day was born and it was good.

    And time to do good things.

    I therefore decided to see how the plaque fits to determine how I should fix the holes.





    Hmmm, and hmmmm, the one hole that was only one hole did not show itself behind the plate! What the heck? OK the word I used did not start with an "h".






    Neither did any of the other holes line up with the holes of the plaque. The plaque was touching the one shafts' housing as can be seen indicated by the pencil in the above picture. Onto grinding away the casting residue that was squatting illegally here. Sounds familiar? I wonder what the residue's reason was?





    And now the plaque could line up with three of the hammer drive rivet holes. The fourth one was still not showing.

    Looking closer at the area I could not see and proof that such a hole was made. I therefore sanded the surface a bit and still no proof that such a hole ever existed.





    I could however see that a large area was repaired by welding ... So obviously the lathe was bashed somewhere in its past life and this lid (cover plate ) was repaired. Maybe for that reason the pop-rivets were used?

    The only thing left to do was to drill a new hole matching the position of the hole in the plaque. This took quite bit of time to drill in the beginning. Typical of drilling welding. Then suddenly I could see from the cuttings that I was drilling into cast iron. So my theory of a welded repair appears to be proven.

    There we are! Two days later and we can show four holes matching the hole locations of a plaque and four other holes to be closed.





    What a process this was ... ai ai

  21. #260
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,018
    Thanked: 359

    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The last two days of the exact current space-time continuum was spent restoring a lathe. Huh?

    Yes, not this one, but another one. Quite a while ago I bought an Eclipse wood lathe and never had the time to clean and assemble it. In the past few days on another forum I asked Richard how he cut the leather washers on his lathe while he was replacing the washers ... his answer? He was doing it on his wood lathe.

    I remembered I had one as well, albeit in parts and sometimes visible when I cleared the one workbench. As I need leather washers, I had to get the lathe (the wood one that is) working.

    But before we start on that allow, me to share the tale of the Eclipse. I bought it from a chappie somewhere where they still wear veldskoene and some form of self defense on their hip. Maybe a kettie? I think it is called a slingshot in British English. So this chappie with his kaki clothes boxed the Eclipse as I requested securely in a wooden box. However, he made the shape almost identical to a casket. On the upper facing panel he wrote in stenciled lettering: "RIP Johnny".

    I arranged for the courier to collect. The courier confirmed collection the next morning as it was in a lonely small town and a bit off the normal track. You know, one of those towns where everyone knows everyone and that you are ill even when you are still healthy. Something like seeing into the future in the present. I am digressing ...

    So next afternoon, no confirmation email, no tracking number from the courier. I phoned. He said they were there, but they are not allowed to courier dead people. So I explained that it is a box with a lathe inside. OK, he will send someone else. The next guy apparently refused to come to work again ... After four days, I managed to get the courier to finally get the box on a bakkie and down to Bloemfontein. And then it got stuck there. It was delivered and everyone refused to come close to the box. In the end I had some very nice words with the depot manager. He proposed that he smash the lid open where the face must be so that everyone can see there is no grey face in the box. After another five day, the box was finally delivered. Front lid smashed to pieces ...

    The tale of the Eclipse. We will drink in respect to that.

    First day and we set out to complete the workbench. I installed adjustable feet to the workbench and Carl sealed it once more with varnish. All of these bought about two years ago. The varnish we had to add a lot of thinners to get it brushable again. Apparently wood varnish does age with time as well.





    This morning I sanded the top to get rid of two years of marks and all sort of paint and fibreglass and glue droplets. Looking good once again!





    I used the open workbench space to sand the underside of the lids of the sandfilter project while I had the sander connected.





    Onto cleaning and restoring the Eclipse. Carl is busy cleaning while I was derusting the handles and nuts in some phosporic acid. I told you it is mesmerising to watch Carl clean.





    After working the whole day, the workbench is assembled. The two bench grinders fitted on the front side of the workbench and the Eclipse lathe on the rear side. The lathe looks all renewed and alive. Resurrected you might say ...


  22. The Following User Says Thank You to mygoggie For This Useful Post:


Page 13 of 28 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •