1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 12





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  1. #221
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I am a happy time traveling coffee drinking chappy.

    In the lot of model making tools, fittings and millions of gazillion rivets, nuts and thingies, was an Engineering Level. Something I always wanted and never had the money to buy.

    Now I can level my machines!


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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    You drink far too much coffee.

  3. #223
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    You drink far too much coffee.
    Either that or nothing ... remember, no alcohol ... sigh ..

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Either that or nothing ... remember, no alcohol ... sigh ..
    ja the time travelling is confusing
    Jakes Louw
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
    Percivamus

  5. #225
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    No its easy Jelo.Its called a series. You know like Bold and Beautiful.Buts its the mens version.
    You just have to be patient ,and have some coffee.

    That lathe is showroom new with shiny knobs ,a sparkling paintjob and beautiful plaques.

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  7. #226
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    After a good nights sleep to let Brain rest and get very intelligent again, I tackled the damaged larger gear selection plaque.

    On the left hand side the top hole goes through two edges, a recess and the "S". Yes "S" stands for sigh ...

    The bottom hole touches an edge and is located in the recess.





    On the right hand side, the top hole was through the "/" of the mm/mm, two edges and the recess.

    The bottom hole touched the edge and was mainly located in the recess.





    I decided to take it slowly and with care as, based on my experience, a lot of work lay ahead.

    First step was to ream the holes.










    Testing the rivets for size and fitment. The holes were a bit larger in diameter compared to the previous plaques I did. So I decided to allow a bit more rivet length.






    All four rivets cut to length. Yes, the one has a larger flange. Well spotted!






    It took a while to rivet all four into position. I took care to make sure the portions of the rivets located in the recesses were tightly riveted down. For this I used a flat punch to hit the rivet in these areas.





    The left hand side was the most problematic so I tackled these first. Amongst the many model building stuff was a whole bank coin bag full of dental drill bits. I used these to make the initial cuts.






    Bottom left more or less shaped.






    The right hand side took quite while to get to the rough final stage. I decided to leave the "/" a bit shorter and just smooth the end of it neatly.






    And after two hours and a nice lunch made by the Boss (thank you ) I finalised and polished the left hand side. The repair came out much better than I expected and when painted in all likelihood will not be noticed.





    I brass wired the plaque clean and degreased it with acetone. Onto painting!

    And disaster struck ...

    I gave the plaques I painted the day before another coat of paint and within five minutes the paint was all blistered! What the heck? I did leave 24h between coats

    Carefully reading the minute print on the can, I saw that this specific Rustoleum needs 48h between coats! What the heck Time for coffee ...

    After a cuppa of Ethiopia I rubbed the blistered paint off, and scrubbed the plaques clean. Wire brushed each one again and degreased each with acetone. Then all four got their new first layer of paint.

    And here the happy five golden ladies lay, tanning in the sun.





    After allowing the paint to dry for 72 hours I gave the plaques a good wipe down with a lint free cloth and gave them another coat of paint.

    Now I need to figure out how to do the red parts. Painting red over black makes the red dull. So I am thinking of first doing a very thin layer of white primer over the black and then do the red layers. First I need to figure out how to do the masking. I think I will get some artist liquid lycra to paint over the areas that needs to remain black. I can then simply rub this off when all is dry.

    Onto other exciting lathe things! The journey awaits!
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/10 at 09:22 PM.

  8. #227
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Those plaques are truelly beautiful. I would love to see how they did them from scratch.Very few speed and feed charts are done like that. It must have been quite an expense initially to make a stamp like that. Im still trying to scratch my head to figure out how you paint the embossed plate with different colours.

  9. #228
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    On the Woodhaven2 website there's a guy by the name of Wallace who does the most amazing restorations of old Wadkin woodworking machines.
    Somewhere in here he described how to paint the tags.
    http://www.thewoodhaven2.co.uk/searc...&author_id=192

    You'll have to register to open this link.
    Unfortunately I can't remember exactly where the description is but it is worth reading through all his restorations. They are works of art and there is a mine of information there about restoring old machinery

  10. #229
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Amongst the things and tools I wanted to buy I spotted an old lamp.






    I knew what the original Colchester machine lamp looks like and the chance to find one will be severely low in good ole SA. This lamp look almost identical to the Colchester one and for me that is good enough.





    So, I asked the gentleman if I can buy the lamp as well even though it was not on the list of stuff that was for sale. He said that if my purchase was big enough he will consider giving it to me. So when I collected the items, there the lamp was! I am ever so grateful as the lamp is of the same era as the lathe and will go well with the lathe!

    As I was taking all the plates and metal parts I did not want to clean to be plated, I decided to to the same with the lamp. Onto stripping the lamp then.












    Notice the cup!






    All the parts were packed into a box ready to be plated. I asked that the cup be powder coated as the original was enameled and that is way too expensive for me.

  11. #230
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Monday arrived and Carl ask what he must do as he has finished the front of the lathe stand to a shiny metal finish. The only problem he had was the door to the coolant sump. He simply could not get this clean.

    So we sat down and had a look see if we can remove it. The hinges on this funny lathe are not machine screwed, but welded to the stand. I was not keen to cut the welding as this would damage the plating. The other issue was to knock the splines of the two hinges out. The splines were however kept in place by the door's bottom edge to which the hinges were welded. So I decided we will bend the edges to get the splines out and bend these back before painting. I still need to figure out how we will assemble the hinges again after everything has been painted.






    I cleaned the door with some phosphoric acid to prevent it rusting while waiting to be plated.





    With the door removed, Carl could finalise cleaning the front panel of the stand. Then it was onto turning the stand onto its front so that the back could be cleaned.

  12. #231
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    With the block and tackle it was a quick job to turn the stand onto its front.

    Here Carl is quick to wire brush the inside of the stands drip tray while waiting for me to decide how we must proceed.





    We had a brief meeting over some ... beer? Nope, but you are almost correct. Some coffee machine juice

    It was decided that we will clean the whole backside, sides and motor chamber and spray these areas with primer in one go before moving onto the front and top. Before turning the stand, I will spray the motor chamber signal red. This will ensure we have good access and can do a good job of spray painting. Due to the confined space, I think I will use my small spray gun I bought in China during one of my traveling trips through that beautiful and friendly country.

    Onto stripping everything remaining from the lathe. That would be the electrical isolation switch and the motor mounting plate and hinge.





    The isolation box was quick to remove.





    It simply screws to the stand with three brass machine screws. Taking care not to damage the porcelain connecting blocks we removed all the wires.





    Next was the motor plate. From other posts on the net, it appears that the shaft is fastened to the collars at each end with grub screws. Not to be. No grub screws for Uncle Allen to address on this funny lathe.

    So we sat down and looked at how the shaft could be removed. It only can be removed from the side of the lathe. We tried shifting it by hand, but had no joy. It was stuck in place. No grub screws, no other locking nuts or bolts, so only option left was friction to keep in place. Looking closer I saw that the end of the shaft had a hole with thread in.





    Brain said something about screw this. I think I did not hear him correctly ... Maybe he did, but I heard: "Screw a bolt in and pull the shaft out."

    So we cleaned the thread that had many layers of paint on.






    Yes, it is a 3/8"-16 thread.






    I made another puller up from parts of a bearing puller and some bolts and nuts.







    Do not make the same mistake as I did and think you can pull the shaft out by tightening the bolt that screws into the shaft. The shaft's metal is so soft that tightening the bolt simply stretched the tread. I had to clean it again with the tap.

    I then used the method of screwing the centre bolt into the shaft as deep as it would go and then tightening the two nuts on the puller's bolt stands. Little by little the shaft came out. After repeating the cycle of adjusting the puller bolt and tightening the nuts again for what felt like ages, the shaft finally pulled from the bushes. By this time an hour has passed! Time flies as you know.





    See, no grub screws.








    The motor chamber awaits cleaning!





    Another experience in its own right ...

  13. #232
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Woolf View Post
    On the Woodhaven2 website there's a guy by the name of Wallace who does the most amazing restorations of old Wadkin woodworking machines.
    Somewhere in here he described how to paint the tags.
    http://www.thewoodhaven2.co.uk/searc...&author_id=192

    You'll have to register to open this link.
    Unfortunately I can't remember exactly where the description is but it is worth reading through all his restorations. They are works of art and there is a mine of information there about restoring old machinery
    Thanks @Woolf. As woodwork is my passion, I will register for sure!

  14. #233
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Those plaques are truelly beautiful. I would love to see how they did them from scratch.Very few speed and feed charts are done like that. It must have been quite an expense initially to make a stamp like that. Im still trying to scratch my head to figure out how you paint the embossed plate with different colours.
    These plates were etched out @plunger. The same method as making a PCB. There are quite a few videos as how the process works. It is fairly easy once you have the artwork done. I could see that the artwork for these plaques were done by hand, albeit on a larger scale and then scaled down most obviously using photography or something similar.

  15. #234
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    These plates were etched out @plunger. The same method as making a PCB. There are quite a few videos as how the process works. It is fairly easy once you have the artwork done. I could see that the artwork for these plaques were done by hand, albeit on a larger scale and then scaled down most obviously using photography or something similar.
    Would love to have seen the process. I guess the original die would have been a reverse plate done laboriously on a pantagragh.

    I got my head around it I think .It must be challenging to hold those plaques if Im right .Yes ,if you look at the back of the plaque they are flat.So no stamping.Although I guess they could be rolled .?Im dying to know how.
    Last edited by plunger; 2020/06/11 at 07:23 AM.

  16. #235
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    While Carl kept himself busy with cleaning the back of the lathe stand, I got back to cleaning the various items that came out of the "To be cleaned" boxes.

    The first thing to bling was the handle of the wormbox handle. Yes, I have showed this before. I love bling so here goes twice overs.

    The before picture.





    After a few hours of sanding with a non-woven abrasive wheel and then polishing, I love the bling look.





    As I was now into handles, the next was the tailstock spindle locking lever. It has been banged about a lot so it is going to take some time cleaning.





    Just for some more bling kick I laid it down next to the polished wormbox handle so that it can know it will be well taken care of while it will go through a difficult, sore and heated path. Sounds like what many of us are going through at the moment. Be assured, each of you that find yourself on this path, you will come out all shiny and blingy!






    I had to change my plans a little. I could not polish only one item at a time. It becomes too hot to handle ..

    So ... I got most of the handles and wheels together and started taking polishing turns on each item. When it became warm, I would put it down and continue with the next.

    The toolpost lever, the tailstock and carriage wheels and the topslide ball handle are all currently being polished when I find a bit of time to kill.










    During mid-morning Carl called me over. He has finished with the back of the stand. Wow! That sure was good news.







    So we took a Jamaican break. And discussed how we can clean the motor chamber. The only way was to wash it with thinners and then sand it. Fortunately I have one of the second most useful tools in my aresenal! A Fein oscillating tool. Next to a Dremel, this is a money saver even though it costs a small fortune. Onto removing the diamond cutter and installing a corner sanding foot on the Fein.

    It took a lot of sweat and more washing and sanding to get all the oil and loose paint removed. At last the chamber looked clean.





    We then got out the pneumatic orbital sander and sanded all the accessible faces of the stand to 200 grit. A LOT of putty came off and we spent the rest of the day just washing, sanding and washing till all looked clean and sparkling.












    Once we have cleaned the area and washed up, the day was gone. Time flies remember? The last step was to wash the cleaned surfaces with some phosphoric acid to prevent any surface rust forming. And it was a good day and we could stand back and admire the work of our hands.

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  18. #236
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    And it is yesterday's tomorrow and tomorrow's yesterday ... after all time is relative.

    First thing to do was remove the red rear cowling of the electrical motor to send it in for plating. It was rusted in a few places and I want some new metal on it. That was an easy job as it basically just twists from the motor body.






    After our morning "tea" break we decided the motor needs to be painted. It simply had too much exposed aluminium for the corrosive conditions where I live.

    Removing the fan should be a simple job. There is only one of Uncle Allen's screws that is securing it! Nope ... it is a roll pin!






    Knocking it out was simple.





    And then we hit the wall. The fan was painted fast onto the shaft. OK, time for a puller. Alas, I do not own a small puller (nudge, nudge and onto my wishlist it goes).

    Time to make a plan. Carl saw that I will be busy for a while so he got onto cleaning the apron. Me? I dug in my puller toolbox and pulled out an old puller I made when I restored a Honda MT50 for my kids and had to pull bearings from the aluminium cased gearbox. I made two hooks from threaded hooks I had in a storage box and presto!






    Once the fan was removed, Carl started off by cleaning the electrical motor. As usual he did an outstanding job. He sure knows how to clean! Many years of cleaning steam locomotives teaches you cleaning techniques with a cloth I can only stand in awe of! That cleaning can be so mesmerising?







    Onto removing the name plaque. By now I know how to use my tack removing tool on the hammer drive rivets.





    By the time I had the fan pulled and the machine plaque removed, Carl had the apron cleaned, brushed and sanded!







    And ... look at that! What do you see? I see that plaques were installed in two separate set of positions. Look closely and you will see these were firstly on the centreline of the apron and the top. Later it was removed and moved to the bottom.





    Remember?





    Closer inspection showed various holes drilled by the Brutish Butcher. I wonder what he was up to moving the plaques?






    I will have to spend some time to check where the plaques should actually be located for this model lathe. Another story for another time frame in our lovely time free zone of space-time continuum.

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  20. #237
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Would love to have seen the process. I guess the original die would have been a reverse plate done laboriously on a pantagragh.

    I got my head around it I think .It must be challenging to hold those plaques if Im right .Yes ,if you look at the back of the plaque they are flat.So no stamping.Although I guess they could be rolled .?Im dying to know how.
    @Plunger, just search YouTube! for example https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uccECgJ2X4o

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  22. #238
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I spent a bit of time this morning on the net and found the original locations of the plaques on the apron.







    I think that because the plaques are a bit hidden, they were moved to a more visible location. Me thinks that because this was a machine marked "RSA" on the door, the plaques had to be more visible. You know why?

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  24. #239
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    Me thinks that because this was a machine marked "RSA" on the door, the plaques had to be more visible. You know why?
    Can be because every 'Appy' had a mullet back in the day...and because SA gentlemen are a bit bigger than the average guy out there, they had to bend down to read the plaques, presenting an all new injury hazard (with the mullet falling over the shoulders and into the moving parts of the lathe), thus they were moved to an easier location to read...

    Keep going please, this is my favourite thread in years!
    Last edited by Dewald Posthumus; 2020/06/12 at 10:52 AM.

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  26. #240
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Looking at those plaques I suspect they are cast.Those letters are quite pronounced and high. Can etching eat that deep.?

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