1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project - Page 11





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  1. #201
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Any idea for filling the Brutish hole(s)?
    Current - 2009 Mazda BT50 3.0CRDi 4x4 d/c
    Previous - 2005 Ranger 2.5 tdi 4x2 d/c (277 422km)

  2. #202
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiceman View Post
    Any idea for filling the Brutish hole(s)?
    TIG weld? Less heat than arc and potentially a better bond? Then grind flat.
    Jakes Louw
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  4. #203
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I am aiming for a two pack epoxy that can bond to oily surfaces. Sika has a very good such product I normally specify.

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  6. #204
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    I wouldnt touch that with a weld. Yes epoxy or peen a brass or copper dowel in it from the back if possible.
    Many ways . Drill and tap a plug and locktite it in is another way.

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  8. #205
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I wouldnt touch that with a weld. Yes epoxy or peen a brass or copper dowel in it from the back if possible.
    Many ways . Drill and tap a plug and locktite it in is another way.
    Will this not be a problem for the guy who is going to restore it in the year 2148?

  9. #206
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I wouldnt touch that with a weld. Yes epoxy or peen a brass or copper dowel in it from the back if possible.
    Many ways . Drill and tap a plug and locktite it in is another way.
    Drill, tap, lock tight and a grubscrew should be the safest way.

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  11. #207
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by EtienneB View Post
    Will this not be a problem for the guy who is going to restore it in the year 2148?
    I doubt you would have to worry about it.

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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiaan Pot View Post
    Drill, tap, lock tight and a grubscrew should be the safest way.
    This is cast iron. No peening, no tapping is allowed. I will epoxy a brass pin in there.

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  14. #209
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by EtienneB View Post
    Will this not be a problem for the guy who is going to restore it in the year 2148?
    He can blame it on Jan van Riebeeck as well.

  15. #210
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by mygoggie View Post
    This is cast iron. No peening, no tapping is allowed. I will epoxy a brass pin in there.
    A copper dowel peened in will never crack that casting if the dowel is annealed first. Dont forget cracked cast iron blocks and heads are repaired with the stitching method of drilling and peening in special dowel stitches. This is a preferred way over welding.

    Drilling cast iron is easy . If you have to put the plate back into the same position you need to consider what substrate your new brass or copper rivits are going to fix into.I would do what you feel most comfortable with. My gut feel is pratleys putty would be the simplest way to do this.
    I would just ask the rep from pratleys if it will stand up to oil.


    Alot of those old castings were imperfect and repaired with Bondo fill .Hell when I took my 13x40 chinese lathe apart I even found sand in the headstock when I poked a bit deeper. (Yes I stripped it down even more than yours)
    The idiot who ground it put the bed on a one meter high table balancing like yours and bumped it with a block and tackle and it fell on the floor ,just after coming off the grinder.

    I had to strip all the paint off to bare metal and take it to get magnetic flux x rayed to see if there were any hidden cracks.
    I had a nice gash in the newly ground ways.

    With regards to using a brass pin .That should be safe and work well but I would also consider using locktite instead of epoxy.I think epoxy needs a bit of meat to work properly whereas the locktites are comfortable with closer tolerances in an anaroebic environment.

    You work very fast and that one lever you polished? . I think this lathe is going to have to stay in a meuseum after you finish.

    One thing I found interesting is that I see under your headstock it is also veed. Many lathes under the headstock are flat.Then you have jacking screws used to alighn your lathe to the ways.With yours it would seem there is no way to do any adjustment.
    When I took mine off I was horrified to see angle grinder marks .It was scraped in with an angle grinder.
    Talk about your brutish friend. Hes an amateur compared to this chinese dude .

    Can you tell us about your phospher treatment of the ways. What product is it and was there much rust to deal with. ? Would you say it darkened or shined up the ways.Not that its important but your ways for an old lathe look quite good considering its age. Are those flaking marks or just day to day wear and tear marks.

  16. #211
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    A few readers on other forums wanted to know how the feet on my funny lathe works and what they actually look like and where they are located. It appears my lathe is the only Student with feet known. Told you it is a funny lathe!

    So I took a few photos of the feet. If you have a Student without feet, this is what the feet looks like. Basically a 1/2" bolt with the end thread turned down to allow a bearing to fit over the end of the bolt. A nut is welded to the bottom plate of the stand. The bolt is the screwed through the nut, the bearing fitted to the bolt end and the end then peened at two places to lock the bearing in place.


















    And with that, the feet show is over! You can now make your own lathe feet!


  17. #212
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post

    Drilling cast iron is easy.
    How do you do this as a normal drill bit makes no headway?


    One thing I found interesting is that I see under your headstock it is also veed. Many lathes under the headstock are flat.Then you have jacking screws used to alighn your lathe to the ways.With yours it would seem there is no way to do any adjustment.
    Yep, that is why I said somewhere above I doubt if the alignment will have to be redone. I will check it in any case.

    Can you tell us about your phospher treatment of the ways. What product is it and was there much rust to deal with. ? Would you say it darkened or shined up the ways.
    Just buy some phosphoric acid at any chemical place (it is used to make Cola drinks and soap and toothpaste) and dilute it to a 40% strength. Rub it on the steel and it will turn the rust into black hard stuff. Basically it turns iron oxide (rust) into iron phosphate. I normally wipe a newly cleaned bare steel surface with a rag soaked in the phosphoric acid to prevent it rusting again in the next few days. It will darken the steel if left alone. If you add copper sulphate to the phosphoric acid it makes a very good cold blueing agent.

    Are those flaking marks or just day to day wear and tear marks.
    Marks from the scraper AFAIK. Close to the chuck there are a few wear and tear marks. The rest looks almost brand new.
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/05 at 09:00 PM.

  18. #213
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    While Carl was in paint stripping heaven, I started cleaning smaller parts. Why? Because I can.

    First was the bag full of parts from the cross-slide.





    The swivel slide clamp bolts are not original and appears to be quite badly made. Sloppy machining with a lot of cutting marks. No ways I am going to waste time on cleaning these. I will make new ones.





    How do you damage the thread on an HT cap screw?? I will replace the damaged cap screws and clean the hole's thread.





    There is a bolty kinda of thing numbered as part number 8573 and named a "Swivel Slide Spigot". A Tripple S! Brings a lot of memories back when my uncle came to show my Dad his brand new Datsun SSS! That was a real fast car!

    This spigot was damaged and because I am apparently turning a funny lathe into a museum piece, I simply had to get it into shape.





    I rubbed it a bit on the diamond plate.





    Looking much better!






    I also cleaned the six giant cap screws holding the bed down onto the stand. Now that will sound real funny in a bedroom. "Hey lovey, please help me to hold down the bed on the picture stand ..." As I said, I have a funny lathe and I live in a funny time traveling space-time world.





    As I always do, cleaned and closed in a tagged bag.






    Time for some coffee and getting ready for the next task.


  19. #214
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Carl was happy to keep scraping away at the paint, so I decided to do some paint removing of my own.

    The past few days I have read a lot about restoring machine plaques. From the absolute absurd videos (why do time wasters make videos and then go as far as to post them to show everyone they have no freaking idea as to what they are doing?) to two videos that made me nod my head in absolute respect.

    First step was to gather the plaques. I sorted them in a specific order. Can you guess what it was?





    Now that the photo session is all done, I went into the garden. Not to drink some coffee in the sunshine. Nope, simply to gather some dune sand and put the sand through a very fine sieve.

    Yes, one of my fav pastimes! Low pressure sandblasting. I love the sand in my ears and in my shoes. Almost feels like being on the beach when the wind is blowing! Maybe this lockdown is really getting to me!

    The smaller plaques was simply to small to be blasted as is, so I stapled them to some scrap plywood.







    Onto blasting. Aha, very interesting! Can you see that the black painting was done over the whole surface of the plaque and then the red painted sections were done afterwards?





    Cleaned and ready for inspection.






    As you can see there is quite a bit of damage. Extra drilled holes drilled through letters and border edging. Damaged corners etc etc. As always when I do not know what to do, I put things aside, give Brain some caffeine and sleep on it.

    Onto that then ....

  20. #215
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Next lady for a shave ...

    I grabbed a gear shifting lever from the box of "To be cleaned parts". Aha, many layers of paint to remove. Fun stuff!





    The collar or spacer ring was painted in-situ. A big no no as the paint will get in between the ring and the surfaces on either side and form a nice grinding paste in the long run. Naughty Brutish Butcher!





    All done and looking good. Not shown is that I also cleaned the tread, the Woodruff key and its slot and masked the shaft off ready for painting of the handle.


  21. #216
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The next item I pulled from the "To clean and fix box" was the ON/OFF/BRAKE handle and related arms.







    As you can see the arm is bent and welded to the shaft. I spent some time on looking at what needs to be done to the arm. This had to receive some panel beating and a good cleaning up.

    Arm back end BEFORE





    Arm back end AFTER





    Arm with brake actuator hole BEFORE







    Arm with brake actuator hole AFTER







    The lever I decided to cut from the shaft and get the welding cut away on a lathe. A thin blade on an angle grinder made quick work of the task.











    I gave the shaft and the lever arm to a friend to clean up. Let's hope he does quick work on it so that I can get a new lever arm made up.

  22. #217
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    At this time Carl called me over. He was having serious issues with the door and the drawer handle recess cups. He simply could not get the paint removed.

    We had a look at the back of the cups and it appears that the cup is held in the door and drawer's front plate with a bar that acts as a locking pin.

    The handle that acts as the locking pin in the door was not welded in place, so I knocked this out with a punch. Once the handle was removed the cup could be knocked loose quite easily and removed.





    The drawer was another issue. The handle was welded to the back of the drawer. I tried to cut the welding with my small angle grinder, but that could not fit into the available space.





    Onto my most valuable tool, the Dremel. It made short work of the welding.






    And out came the cup and handle.








    With the handles and cups removed, Carl was smiling again and off he went with the heat gun and the wire brush.





    And it was time for? Coffee!!

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  24. #218
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    Unfortunately I did not have time to write anything about this project last night. Not that it really makes a difference in our space-time continuum as we can just move forward or backward to suit our own time reference datum so as to continue in our own time. Make sense??

    It was evening and I had some spare time to clean a few small items. The first was the saddle's front strip. The $%$&^[email protected]%21!&^%@ one that kept me from pulling the saddle from the gap at the chuck end.







    Then I did the thread indicator as I previously showed and discussed. But heck, let's do it again. Why not? Life is too short to worry about being absolutely consistent in your approach.

    Smoothing out the dinged surface on the drill press with a diamond plate.





    Sanded to 1200 grit. The photo is lying ...





    Polished and ready for the numbers to be painted. The photo is lying again ...





    First coat of black paint is on.





    And the second coat is painted.






    Rubbing the polished surface clean leaves the paint in the grooves.





    Working with a very fine brush the red paint was painted in and trimmed with a toothpick and then the surfaces was rubbed clean again. Whala and she is all ready to dance!





    Onto the cross-slide screw keep. Also shown above, but we are on a roll so why not?

    Cleaned and polished and the photo is lying once again. Maybe I had a wrong setting set on the camera app?





    Painted





    Done. The stamped grooves are VERY shallow so it was quite difficult to make it look like something.






    To the box I went and dipped my roaming hand into the dark unknown ... and what do we have here?

    The gearbox's tumbler bearing flanged bush with O-ring. The O-ring was soft in years yonder and I had a battle to get it to let go. One more item to find and replace.






    The groove took a while to get clean but there she is, all polished and ready for a new O-ring.






    I forgot to take a picture of the cleaned and taped up saddle rear strip. Here are the before pictures.








    Next was the switch operating lever. Again no after photos available. I will take photos after it has been painted.















    Next to clean was the tumbler shifting arm. It cleaned up nicely.





    However looking at the slot, there was to be found many years of debris and dust and creepy things.





    A few sawcuts and she was clean as a whistle.







    It was getting late and I wanted to clean the arm's tumbler handle. Yes, I do know I have shown this before. So what? I want to do it again. I love shiny things!

    The yucky ugly lady




    After about an hour, she looks like a princess.







    And I thought why not complete the tumbler family and polish the wacked and beaten tumbler bearing plug. OK, OK, yes I have shown this before to impress @Family_Dog. This took more than an hour of smoothing and polishing.







    By this time it was time for bedtime ... so I cleaned up, made some dearly required coffee and called it a successful day!
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/08 at 09:50 PM.

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  26. #219
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    The next morning Carl has cleaned the splash plate that fits onto the back of the lathe as far as he could. I then proceeded to help him in getting the red paint removed by brushing loads of thinners into the paint so as to dissolve it and him wiping it off with rags. This took almost two hours to get both sides clean!





    The plate was in some kind of accident and the side plate was all bent.







    Onto panel beating we went. I stopped midway as I had no idea what it actually should look like in its original shape. So I asked on another forum and friendly Phil sent me pictures of his cover.




    It was not identical to mine it seems, but I could get the general idea of what it should look like. So onto hammering, and I mean real hammering I proceeded.





    It took another morning of hammering all the edges and dings out but in the end she was all straightened out.






    And that is that with this splash plate ... More later about its other adventures!
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/08 at 11:34 PM.

  27. #220
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    Default Re: 1953 Colchester Student Mk1 6" gap bed - A restoration project

    As stated before I have spent considerable time learning how to restore brass plaques.

    And here the family of plaques are ready for further care.




    Following the lead of the two guys who impressed me, I set out to start getting the plaques back into some decent shape. I heated most of them and taking my time hammered these with a dead blow hammer against a hardwood block. The corners with the expanded hole edges I managed to get back into shape by heating and softly hammering, heating some more and repeating the process until it was looking as original as I could get these old golden ladies.

    Time for coffee as time flies while hammering metal.

    After reading and reading and some more reading I was tired. Huh, you are asking ... Let me explain.

    I was trying to find a way to repair the damaged brass plaques and more specifically closing the extra larger holes that the Brutish Butcher drilled.








    I could find nothing that made me want to feel excited about. Then .... in some obscure forum in which watchmakers share their long lost trade I found what I was after. A poster (is there such a word for someone posting in a thread?) mentioned that his grandfather repaired damaged brass components as used in clocks.

    Brain said: "Read further" and low and behold this interested me. The poster's grandad drilled a hole in the damaged area, reamed both sides and inserted a brass rod and riveted it flat on both ends. Ha, there is my solution!

    So I scratched in my recent purchase of mini-drawers filled with whatever you want in model building and I found some rivets that matched the colour of the plaque's brass.





    This will work! Brain interrupted my state of excitement and said: "Tackle the small plaque with only the one damaged hole as a starter". Thanks Brain! You remembered that I have never done this before.

    First step was to ream the hole on both sides of the plate.







    This is going to work!







    I then cut the rivet to length using my Dremel tool.





    Front face riveting in process.





    And done.







    Onto infinity and beyond! I had no idea as to what would be the most effective way of flattening the rivet without damaging the surrounding edges. I prepared for the worst and wrapped the plaques in three layers of masking tape.





    And started filing the front face of the rivet.






    And the back.





    Then the difficult part came. The rivet was located in such a way that half of the front face of the rivet is raised and the other half recessed. I took out a very small Dremel grinding stone and ... made some coffee ... My nerves were getting to me.

    After the soothing effect of some Jamaican beans on Brain, I put some good Blues music on. Yeah, my garage workshop has its own good quality Hi-Fi system.

    Taking my time I lowered the one half of the rivet face to match the recessed portion. Finishing the edge with a very sharp needle Dremel reamer, I was done. Whichever way you want it; done.





    Next step was to get rid of my filing and sanding marks, so onto polishing with some AluOxide polishing soap. I was very happy with the result.

    Can you see where the hole was?




    Look again.





    No, it is not on the photo's top side! That mark is a deep scratch and I left it to show some patina.

    I brass brush cleaned the now fixed plaques and sprayed them black with some Rustoleum paint.






    Aha, you noticed. Only four painted plaques! The fifth plaque I left for later. With the knowledge gained I realised that it simply has too much work on it to be done in part of a day. The repair of No5 I will cover in a following thread.

    Onto ...
    Last edited by mygoggie; 2020/06/09 at 10:01 PM.

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