Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living





Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Prince Albert
    Age
    28
    Posts
    260
    Thanked: 375

    Default Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    When the threat of Covid-19 started to emerge in February we decided to buy a caravan and to live in isolation for the foreseeable future.

    We got this cute Jurgens Magnificent 1978 the day before lockdown came into effect and towed it to Prince Albert to my in-laws' farm.

    We spent some time cleaning it, but wanted to do more restoration/painting, but naturally during Level 5 we couldn't buy anything that was needed.

    Now that online shops are starting to open again for delivery I would like some advice/suggestions.

    Where can I buy solar panels and solar charger with delivery options to Prince Albert? I saw takealot have a few options, but its probably not recommended to buy solar equipment from takealot. Also what brands/models is recommended. We would only need a very basic setup for charging laptops and maybe powering a 12v fridge which also still needs to be bought (have used a Waeco previously which was quite trust worthy, don't know if there are better options for a caravan setup vs 4x4. Is there 12v fridges with front doors instead of the usual 'cooler box' design?). I already have a 100Ah deep cycle battery and 500w inverter. Would thus as far as I understand only need 1 or 2 120W solar panels and a Solar MPPT Charger.

    Then I also need a 12v water pump. The caravan has a tap with a power switch that can be connected to the battery and a pipe leading into a cupboard where presumable a water container can be put. I thus need a simple 12v pump that is placed inside a water container. Something that would fit through a container cap. Where can this be bought and what is it called? An in-line 12v pump?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20200405_182608.jpg 
Views:	533 
Size:	239.3 KB 
ID:	571419   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20200403_173403 (1).jpg 
Views:	552 
Size:	315.4 KB 
ID:	571421   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20200318_102614.jpg 
Views:	581 
Size:	181.5 KB 
ID:	571422  

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to hugmin42 For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Alberton
    Age
    59
    Posts
    622
    Thanked: 1001

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    The pump from caravan shops. Fits in the neck of a 25l container.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    31
    Posts
    3,018
    Thanked: 380

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Apart from the 100 Ah battery and 500W inverter, does the caravan have any other electrics installed, a charging system of some sort or any distrobution panel?

    You'll need a charging system for your battery, you could get only a solar controller or add AC mains charging as well if you plan to camp where 230V mains is available.

    As for online ordering obviously solar panels is quite big so this will influence cost, but you can look at 4x4 Direct, Bushpower and Sinetech.

    Size of your solar panels will all depend what you want to run, you already mentioned a fridge, water pump and then there's the inverter as well, plus I assume some lights.
    It's in pubs where the world's greatest ideas begin.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Prince Albert
    Age
    28
    Posts
    260
    Thanked: 375

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Leigh View Post
    The pump from caravan shops. Fits in the neck of a 25l container.
    Thanks, sounds like the type of thing we're looking for. Do you know any online caravan shops that can deliver?


    Quote Originally Posted by bigboy529 View Post
    Apart from the 100 Ah battery and 500W inverter, does the caravan have any other electrics installed, a charging system of some sort or any distrobution panel?

    You'll need a charging system for your battery, you could get only a solar controller or add AC mains charging as well if you plan to camp where 230V mains is available.

    As for online ordering obviously solar panels is quite big so this will influence cost, but you can look at 4x4 Direct, Bushpower and Sinetech.

    Size of your solar panels will all depend what you want to run, you already mentioned a fridge, water pump and then there's the inverter as well, plus I assume some lights.
    The caravan had a 'caravan-plug' which basically just powers a multi-plug and some lights when connected to mains. We're however not going to be able to connect it to AC mains. For lights we currently have one of those Ellies battery boxes with LED lights and two small 5W solar panels. It provides more than enough light for inside and outside the caravan.

    So the big battery will be mainly for a fridge and charging laptops/camera, etc.

    Thanks for reminding me of 4x4 Direct, have used them before, will have a look at their Solar selection.

    I saw this fridge on takealot: https://www.takealot.com/snomaster-1.../PLID53900338/ The front opening door looks nice for caravan use, but there's no reviews and not sure how it would compare with the traditional camping fridges like this one https://www.takealot.com/snomaster-5...0/PLID56134171 In terms of power use and keeping things cool, etc.

    Also how much more solar panels/batteries would be needed to power a 220v 'normal' bar fridge. Would the price difference between AC fridge and DC fridge (R4000) be able to make up for the cost of extra solar panels/batteries.
    Last edited by hugmin42; 2020/05/15 at 06:20 PM. Reason: typos

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Alberton
    Age
    59
    Posts
    622
    Thanked: 1001

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Whats wrong with the caravan fridge?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bethlehem
    Age
    53
    Posts
    9,210
    Thanked: 4396

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Off Topic...........But this is just SO cool. Julle lucky ######s
    1998 Nissan Patrol 4,5 GRX........................."Olive"
    1997 Land Cruiser HZJ 75..........................."Jack"
    2008 Mercedes Benz CL 500........................"Bullet" (going....going...)
    2006 Mercedes Benz C 180K........................"Sussie"

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Petri Oosthuizen For This Useful Post:


  9. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Prince Albert
    Age
    28
    Posts
    260
    Thanked: 375

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Leigh View Post
    Whats wrong with the caravan fridge?
    It's 42 years old (probably). It's an ice craft caravanner 85. Even if I get it working according to some posts on this forum it is not very efficient. If someone knows more about it I'd be willing to try and give the gas option a shot again, but the last owner didn't use the gas option as it is closed off.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    68
    Posts
    169
    Thanked: 117

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Leigh View Post
    Whats wrong with the caravan fridge?
    The 220V fridges are power hungry. They draw more than 10A when you run it off an invertor where the 12V units should draw about 4A in the hot conditions of the Karroo. A chest design is also more efficient than the front opening caravan fridges. This means you will have to double up on the solar system. (Much more expensive than buying the real thing.) Buy directly from snowmaster, it should be a lot cheaper.

    On the solar system you must overdesign to get out of the hassle zone. Keep in mind that you will get about 4 to 5 hours of charging time on a good day. (No clouds) It will then have to run on batteries for the rest of the 24 hours. Say 20 hours on the batteries. In hot conditions that will translate to about 20 hours at 4A just for the fridge. This means you will need a minimum of 80 Ah. That translate to 2 x 105 Ah at least. The panels must be big enough to run the fridge while charging the batteries when the sun is there. If you work on 4 hours you must generate 4x4 Ah + the 80 Ah = 96 Ah. 96/4 = 24 A minimum from the panels. At 12V that is 300 W panel minimum. Remember panels that low in SA must be installed at 45 degrees or steeper to get any sort of efficiency. If you have a day of clouds you will still run out of power. Install a battery guard to switch off your 12V system if it drops below 12.1 V on lead acid batteries. If you do not you will destroy those batteries in no time. The standard 105Ah is still your best bang for bucks, but then you must protect them.

    All this does not include the pump or laptops and cellphones. Consider having the water on a stand and gravity supply.
    On the 12V side you must not skimp on copper. Thick wires are a must as is very good connections. Either hydraulic crimping or decent solder.

    Sounds like a nice option staying out there.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Pieter de Waal For This Useful Post:


  12. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    31
    Posts
    3,018
    Thanked: 380

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Quote Originally Posted by hugmin42 View Post
    Thanks, sounds like the type of thing we're looking for. Do you know any online caravan shops that can deliver?




    The caravan had a 'caravan-plug' which basically just powers a multi-plug and some lights when connected to mains. We're however not going to be able to connect it to AC mains. For lights we currently have one of those Ellies battery boxes with LED lights and two small 5W solar panels. It provides more than enough light for inside and outside the caravan.

    So the big battery will be mainly for a fridge and charging laptops/camera, etc.

    Thanks for reminding me of 4x4 Direct, have used them before, will have a look at their Solar selection.

    I saw this fridge on takealot: https://www.takealot.com/snomaster-1.../PLID53900338/ The front opening door looks nice for caravan use, but there's no reviews and not sure how it would compare with the traditional camping fridges like this one https://www.takealot.com/snomaster-5...0/PLID56134171 In terms of power use and keeping things cool, etc.

    Also how much more solar panels/batteries would be needed to power a 220v 'normal' bar fridge. Would the price difference between AC fridge and DC fridge (R4000) be able to make up for the cost of extra solar panels/batteries.


    In my opinion if you are not going to be able to plug in to 230V mains, then keep as much as possible to 12V equipment. For that bar fridge you'll need a bigger inverter, at least one extra battery and then a couple of solar panels, so the R4000 difference won't be enough.

    Considering cost
    For now you should be fine with the battery you already have, as long as you use that 500W inverter and the water pump sparingly and switch it off if not needed.
    I would however plan everything around adding a second battery later.

    In terms of solar, start off with 2x 100W - 120W panels, but when sizing your solar controller, make provision to add more panels, you never know what else you want to add in future.

    The Victron MPPT controllers are very flexible in that they can usually handle high voltage, so you always have the option to wire your panels in series, If you look at something like the Victron 75/15 or 75/20 controllers it can handle 75V and 15 or 20 amps.

    Do you have a specific budget in mind for this entire project? You can always look at second hand camping fridges to save a couple bucks, obviously shipping can become a issue then, but some real bargains are to be had if you keep a eye on classifieds pages. Alternatively, nothing wrong with those Snomasters on Takalot, especially if you keep your eye on the daily deals, they have nice specials from time to time.
    It's in pubs where the world's greatest ideas begin.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to bigboy529 For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Stellenbosch
    Age
    65
    Posts
    3,736
    Thanked: 432

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Wrt a fridge, rather opt for a top opening more rugged type than the front opening 12V only model.
    I have a few and the Dometic 50l is good value for money.
    If you dont mind spending a bit more get a fridge/freezer separate combination.
    Enjoy, Im jealous.

    Last edited by Damdan; 2020/05/16 at 12:44 PM.
    If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right. SJ

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Damdan For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oranjemund Namibia
    Age
    59
    Posts
    923
    Thanked: 449

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    On the solar panel thing, my setup ~
    I have mounted my solar panels on my bakkie canopy. They are 2 x 45 Watt panels = 90 watts.
    My 100ah battery, charge controller is mounted in a box in the bakkie.
    I have a jurgens oryx Caravan. I try and park it in shade and position my bakkie to catch sun on the canopy. I feed power directly from the battery in the bakkie into the Caravan battery through the standard connector on the Caravan. I have a 5m lead so it gives me some flexibility.
    I run a 45l national Luna weekender fridge/freezer in the Caravan. I turn the fridge off at night when I sleep mainly because it disturbs me. This also helps on the battery power management. I run the Caravan lights, pump etc. I also run an inverter to charge my camera battery etc. I do only operate the inverter in the day.
    I have camped off grid for a week like this, it works for me.
    My take on it is that if you mount the panels on the Caravan, you will always have to position it in the sun which may not be ideal.
    Kimball R. Pitcher

    Head - 2007 Toyota Fortuner, OME, extra tank, roof rack, bent running boards
    Heart - SFA hilux dcab


  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Posts
    44
    Thanked: 19

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    I have a similar setup with 2 x 100w panels mounted on the roof of my bakkie canopy that charge a deep cycle battery that is stored in high lid ammo box (wolffpak) with the charge controller mounted on the lid of the box - very simple setup. I run my NL 60l fridge/freezer and 2 small LED light bars. Now and again we will charge cell phones and a samsung tablet via the USB ports on the charge controller.

    I didn't want to park my bakkie in the sun while in camp so I used another 2 panels that are hinged together (like a briefcase) with a longish lead that allows me to park the bakkie in the shade and place the 2 free standing panels in the sun.

    The battery box is not permanently mounted in the bakkie so if I want I can remove it from the bakkie and place it under my gazebo etc and can also remove the fridge from the bakkie and put that under the gazebo as well - all running off the 2 free standing panels. Or I can leave everything in the bakkie and just run it from the free standing panels, all depends on my needs and camping requirements.

    I had the panels freely available after we removed a solar installation from my late fathers cottage. The 2 free standing panels that I have hinged together are a bit big and clumsy to cart around and move, but nothing I can't deal with. The whole setup works like a charm and we have camped off the grid for 2 or 3 weeks at a time with no problems at all.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Prince Albert
    Age
    28
    Posts
    260
    Thanked: 375

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    @jelo Yes, the build quality is really good. We towed it to Prince Albert from Hartenbos and it felt really solid. Would have been nice to actually use it as a caravan, but for now and probably the rest of its life it will mostly just stand in one place or at most move around on the farm to test out different locations.

    Thanks @KimballRand and @Mosasa for your inputs. I will probably mount the panels on a pole at 45 degrees which can then be rotated to track the sun (The farm currently have two solar pumps with similar setup). Or while we're still location scouting we can just put the panels on the ground against a crate or something. What I'm however getting from your inputs is that anything from 90 Watts will do. So for a start 2 x 120W would be more than enough. Also good idea about turning off the fridge for the noise, luckily it is quite cold at night so wouldn't even lose that much temperature.

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Honeydew
    Age
    53
    Posts
    79
    Thanked: 79

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Just out of interest, how do you keep yourselves occupied each day being so isolated?

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to Frog For This Useful Post:


  21. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Paarl
    Age
    48
    Posts
    494
    Thanked: 72

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Those old caravan fridges normally worked with ammonia in the pipes sometimes you just have to turn the fridge around on its head for a day and then it will work great again.

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Age
    78
    Posts
    10
    Thanked: 1

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Quote Originally Posted by hugmin42 View Post
    When the threat of Covid-19 started to emerge in February we decided to buy a caravan and to live in isolation for the foreseeable future.

    We got this cute Jurgens Magnificent 1978 the day before lockdown came into effect and towed it to Prince Albert to my in-laws' farm.

    We spent some time cleaning it, but wanted to do more restoration/painting, but naturally during Level 5 we couldn't buy anything that was needed.

    Now that online shops are starting to open again for delivery I would like some advice/suggestions.

    Where can I buy solar panels and solar charger with delivery options to Prince Albert? I saw takealot have a few options, but its probably not recommended to buy solar equipment from takealot. Also what brands/models is recommended. We would only need a very basic setup for charging laptops and maybe powering a 12v fridge which also still needs to be bought (have used a Waeco previously which was quite trust worthy, don't know if there are better options for a caravan setup vs 4x4. Is there 12v fridges with front doors instead of the usual 'cooler box' design?). I already have a 100Ah deep cycle battery and 500w inverter. Would thus as far as I understand only need 1 or 2 120W solar panels and a Solar MPPT Charger.

    Then I also need a 12v water pump. The caravan has a tap with a power switch that can be connected to the battery and a pipe leading into a cupboard where presumable a water container can be put. I thus need a simple 12v pump that is placed inside a water container. Something that would fit through a container cap. Where can this be bought and what is it called? An in-line 12v pump?
    Engel make a nice upright 220v/12v upright fridge which is fitted into the Bac Trax by Kennis Caravans Roodepoort

  23. The Following User Says Thank You to jdavis For This Useful Post:


  24. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bethlehem
    Age
    53
    Posts
    9,210
    Thanked: 4396

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Nog STEEDS nie vir my reg dat Mense sulke Pics post vir al ons Mere Middelklas Mortals om oor te drool nie.

    Dit grens aan Sadisme, veral nou dat daar sulke home made Plaas Eetgoed ook betrokke is.

    Keep them coming PLEASE
    1998 Nissan Patrol 4,5 GRX........................."Olive"
    1997 Land Cruiser HZJ 75..........................."Jack"
    2008 Mercedes Benz CL 500........................"Bullet" (going....going...)
    2006 Mercedes Benz C 180K........................"Sussie"

  25. The Following User Says Thank You to Petri Oosthuizen For This Useful Post:


  26. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Kuilsrivier
    Age
    49
    Posts
    1,958
    Thanked: 135

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Look, even if you get the old fridge working, you would be looking at around 1kg gas per 24 hours.
    If you can live with that, no problem.
    At least you will have some heating for those cold winter nights.

    If you do decide to go for a compressor fridge, go for the chest type one.
    They let out less cold air when you open them.
    A normal bar type fridge could also work, but then you would need much bigger batteries and perhaps also a much bigger inverter.

    You are indeed very lucky to be able to do this!!!

    My current camp set-up is with a 240W solar panel, but with 2 x 200Ah batteries.
    I run lights, 80L Waco, 45L National Luna and my Nespresso machine, no problems


    2007 Nissan Navara 4L Auto - Worshond


  27. The Following User Says Thank You to Wetkit For This Useful Post:


  28. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,506
    Thanked: 2221

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Quote Originally Posted by Wetkit View Post
    Look, even if you get the old fridge working, you would be looking at around 1kg gas per 24 hours.
    If you can live with that, no problem.
    At least you will have some heating for those cold winter nights.


    If you do decide to go for a compressor fridge, go for the chest type one.
    They let out less cold air when you open them.
    A normal bar type fridge could also work, but then you would need much bigger batteries and perhaps also a much bigger inverter.

    You are indeed very lucky to be able to do this!!!

    My current camp set-up is with a 240W solar panel, but with 2 x 200Ah batteries.
    I run lights, 80L Waco, 45L National Luna and my Nespresso machine, no problems
    Where did you get this from a caravan 3 way uses about 180 - 280g of gas per 24hour at 25 deg ambient and that takes the temp down to -15. On a fridge only you have a 75 - 130 w element so work out how much or little gas you need to get this output. As for the heating in winter........wishful thinking you can't feel it in summer what about winter.

    The reason you don't run the 12V side without having back up is because the 130w translates to 11A on the 12v side and that can buckle the battery. If you convert the 12V to 220 the draw on the 12v side stays the same in theory, in practice it is more as you have some loss.

    I have had a few years working on and using these contraptions, serviced my first one when I was 16. Still have one in my workshop keeping cool drinks cold.
    Henk
    Adventure is out there go find it

    Fitment and trailer service. Agent for SnoMaster & Tentco
    Follow us on Facebook

  29. The Following User Says Thank You to hbannink For This Useful Post:


  30. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Cape Town Southern Suburbs
    Posts
    3,115
    Thanked: 1134

    Default Re: Jurgens Magnificent 1978 - remote off-grid living

    Isn't it going to get p##s cold in a caravan in Prince Albert in winter?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •