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  1. #21
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    I'm mostly doing Botswana and Zimbabwe..
    I have the cruiser 80 series (petrol)
    I'm sure it's going to serve me well
    Quote Originally Posted by tashtego9 View Post
    I am a big fan of the Patrols, allof them, however it depends where exactly you are going with this tour.

    The Nissan network is not great outside SA, and when you find a franchise (usually a multibrand franchise), they hardly have any stock and they look at you as if you are some kind of alien. Parts will be twice the real price.

    I would say, drive the same hilux (or LC) that your clients are driving, if you are venturing outside of SA.

    If you are staying within SA with your group, then you have more choice.

    Good luck!

  2. #22
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Quote Originally Posted by RichisAfrika View Post
    I'm mostly doing Botswana and Zimbabwe..
    I have the cruiser 80 series (petrol)
    I'm sure it's going to serve me well
    You're good to go.🚗

  3. #23
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Connan View Post
    Rich, South Africa is unfortunately besotted with Toyota. To the point that it's almost a religion. There is a thriving Patrol owners group here, and we have more than enough backup when it comes to spares from a couple of independent operators.

    As for running costs, the Diesel is significantly cheaper right up until the moment you have to open the engine. it is CRITICAL to find a good engine, and to keep it happy. A re-build on a TD42 will cost you over R70 000. The TB45 will cost less than half that to re-build.

    But the diesel's fuel consumption is about 60% that of the petrol, although the services are more frequent.

    As for diff lock, take note that the Y60 diesel did not have one, only limited slip diff in the rear axle. Y61's do have factory diff lock in the rear axle.

    That car you show looks tidy from outside, but if the price is R85k, I think that's a bit much (although if the engine is in perfect condition it might be worth the money).
    There is another one. It has done 220.000 but does not have full service history but looks good on pics.
    It's at Webuycars and the price is 61.000
    What caught my attention with was the full dealer service history and it looks extremely good also insideName:  Crop800x600%20(1).jpeg
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  4. #24
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Quote Originally Posted by RichisAfrika View Post
    There is another one. It has done 220.000 but does not have full service history but looks good on pics.
    It's at Webuycars and the price is 61.000
    What caught my attention with was the full dealer service history and it looks extremely good also inside
    Petrol. You're not winning anything. Use your Cruiser.
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  6. #25
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    Petrol. You're not winning anything. Use your Cruiser.
    +1

    you already have it and you already know it. Rather spend that cash on your cruiser to sort out any issues it might have.

  7. #26
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Well...I dont REALLY know it since its still new to me...
    Haven't done a trip yet...
    My plan then is to find a reliable mechanic with cruiser experience (I'm in Hoedspruit) and have it "ground zero'ed)
    Engine is fine
    Gearbox is fine
    It has a slack to the rear diff (I think it's diff problem. If it is I'll have it overhauled and might as well have a lock put In place.
    Then comes the fun (and expensive ) part.
    Outfitting it..
    But ill stick to the bare necessities to start with and find my nedt as I go.
    Its SOOOO easy to go o. A spending spree and find everything necessary.
    The fuel consumption I guess I'll have to learn to love...
    I must just charge more..
    Quote Originally Posted by AboutAfrica View Post
    +1

    you already have it and you already know it. Rather spend that cash on your cruiser to sort out any issues it might have.

  8. #27
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Keep your kit basic, most people tend to go overboard and add a whole bunch of stuff they dont need. IMO if you would run a diesel or a petrol over a few trips there would not be much cost difference, especially when it comes to repairs and maintenance. My 105 gives me 5.5km/l loaded for a 7 day kaokoland/damaraland wild camping trip, my friends puma landy gives him 6.5km/l also loaded, so no huge difference there.

    Like you say, start with the basics and after a trip or two you will have a better idea of what you need/dont need.

    My setup very basic, fridge, water tanks, RTT and a few ammo boxes. Works for me.

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  10. #28
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Quote Originally Posted by AboutAfrica View Post
    Keep your kit basic, most people tend to go overboard and add a whole bunch of stuff they dont need. IMO if you would run a diesel or a petrol over a few trips there would not be much cost difference, especially when it comes to repairs and maintenance. My 105 gives me 5.5km/l loaded for a 7 day kaokoland/damaraland wild camping trip, my friends puma landy gives him 6.5km/l also loaded, so no huge difference there.

    Like you say, start with the basics and after a trip or two you will have a better idea of what you need/dont need.

    My setup very basic, fridge, water tanks, RTT and a few ammo boxes. Works for me.
    agree

    Africa isn't that wild any more, a good satellite phone is probably the best investment anyway. And leading a bunch of European guests in rental 4x4s means you shouldn't be driving anywhere too risky anyway.
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  12. #29
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Oooo,but I do...they have to learn the ins and out of recovery
    I have max group of 10 people..The main issue is that I do the cooking.
    So I do have to carry a bit of equipment.
    But the longest we stay (Maun-Kasane) in the bush is 6 days..
    But still nedt pots and pans(blody scottle )
    I'll just throw it all in the back for a few test runs.
    And then I'll probably build my own rack on the back to soothe my nedt.
    I'm thinking about making a "lego" (being Danish and all) version so I can have the back kittet and then drop half or all the rear seat if/when required
    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    agree

    Africa isn't that wild any more, a good satellite phone is probably the best investment anyway. And leading a bunch of European guests in rental 4x4s means you shouldn't be driving anywhere too risky anyway.

  13. #30
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    I hear what you say about the recoveries etc, it's all part of the experience, but just remember, what we know as normal off-roading is to them something very different. I drive divorce pass without batting a eye but german friends who were with thought they were going to die.

    I have been in the tourism industry for most of my life and have guided quite a few self-drive trips/4x4 trails with european clients and like Jelo say's you have to be very careful how far you push them, not just for their sake but for the safety of their vehicle as well, most of them are freaked out enough just on the gravel road.

    For the cooking don't get too many pots etc, a decent size potjie pot and two flat bottom pots usualy do the trick. And like you say the skottel. But am sure you have that covered. If you dont have a roofrack then invest in one of those, comes in very handy.

    I see you mention Botswana, just be sure to have all your registrations etc in order, they have become very strict, which I can totally understand.
    Same with Nam. But am sure you have looked into all of this as well.

  14. #31
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Thanks for the feedback.
    Roof rack and tent definitely.
    And with the pots just what I'm doing.
    Ofcourse I I dont "break them" but break them in.
    I have traveled them both extensively so I mostly know what to expect.
    I've done Capetown to Copenhagen in an old series so the 80 is a pleasure
    Quote Originally Posted by AboutAfrica View Post
    I hear what you say about the recoveries etc, it's all part of the experience, but just remember, what we know as normal off-roading is to them something very different. I drive divorce pass without batting a eye but german friends who were with thought they were going to die.

    I have been in the tourism industry for most of my life and have guided quite a few self-drive trips/4x4 trails with european clients and like Jelo say's you have to be very careful how far you push them, not just for their sake but for the safety of their vehicle as well, most of them are freaked out enough just on the gravel road.

    For the cooking don't get too many pots etc, a decent size potjie pot and two flat bottom pots usualy do the trick. And like you say the skottel. But am sure you have that covered. If you dont have a roofrack then invest in one of those, comes in very handy.

    I see you mention Botswana, just be sure to have all your registrations etc in order, they have become very strict, which I can totally understand.
    Same with Nam. But am sure you have looked into all of this as well.

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  16. #32
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Hmm: I don't agree that the LC is a better bet because of spares availability. When we drove 45,000 Km through Southern and Eastern Africa in 2017 (Series 80 LC) we found that most Toyota dealers were not interested in doing anything on a vehicle which was not in their current /recent range (with a few honourable exceptions). We learned to go to independent mechanics. Getting spares was not as easy as the myths would have you believe. The Toyota dealers had little other than filters, and would tell us that they would need to order parts from Japan, which would take 6-8 weeks to arrive (!). Sometimes we could find spares at local dealers, however often would have to get them shipped to us - amayama.com was our saviour.

    There's no doubt that Toyota has a big share of the market in Southern Africa, however in Central Africa my experience was that Patrols were in use at least as much as LCs.

    "I already have this 80 series (petrol)"

    Then I would do a complete rebuild and replace everything which might fail (especially suspension, transmission, and also do a complete engine overhaul) and then use it.

    "I have this idea that diesel is cheaper (it is) and that I can run my trips cheaper if i get a diesel."

    Yes, unless you find yourself somewhere where diesel is not available (!) - obviously you can carry more diesel (long range tank/fuel cans) however this adds weight (and perhaps lifts the CoG) and this increases fuel consumption.

    As noted, if you need to fix a diesel it's expensive.

    "I know I know....buy a new defender or cruiser....."


    There's a very good reason you see very few Defenders in the more remote areas of Africa!
    Last edited by alannymarce; 2020/04/24 at 06:38 PM.

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  18. #33
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    One more thought, albeit slightly off topic: if you are going to be working as a tour guide you'll need work permits for the countries involved. I assume you have a plan to get these?

    To get a work permit you'll almost certainly need to have a residence permit in at least one of the countries in which you'll be working - where do you plan to establish residence?

    As a resident, you'll need to register the vehicle (you cannot run it on a carnet as a resident). Do you have a plan for this?

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  20. #34
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Yep, you need to be a certified tour guide as far as I know.
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  21. #35
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Probably a redundant comment as the OP has already got himself a LC, but I've heard that Botswana is really good for Patrol spares as they use them as their main military light truck?

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  23. #36
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    Default Re: What would you buy and why

    Quote Originally Posted by jelo View Post
    Yep, you need to be a certified tour guide as far as I know.
    100% correct.

    I am a qualifiedand registered Adventure Tourist Guide (4x4 Overland & Trails Guide) and to take people on tours in Southern Africa you have to be qualified, registered and if you guide in the SADC country where you not registered, you have to apply for a work permit. You will only get such work permit if you can prove that no local guides are available to guide the tour. That is near impossible to prove....

    If you are qualified as a cultural guide, that is all you are allowed to guide, not 4x4 Overland tours, or hiking or mountaineering or anything else.

    Illegal guiding or leading tours without qualifications and registration can earn you a big fine! A second offence will very possibly see your vehicle confiscated and more than likely also lead to a R100k fine or a jail sentence.

    If you will take even one paying passenger in your vehicle, it has to have a Public Carrier Permit, only issued in Pretoria at the Department of transport. Only Black owned Touring companies seem to get them these days, some guys bought new vehicles (mini busses) for which they have been waiting for permits for two years, paying monthly finance costs for parked vehicles...

    The same penalties apply as for unregistered guides. Then, being a vehicle used for paying passengers, it requires to go through a roadworthy test every 6 months.
    Last edited by mvcoller; 2020/05/07 at 09:07 PM.
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