Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands





Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Good morning,

    I have been to Zambia a number of times, but in July/August I go with a specific mission.

    We are travelling with a proper twitcher who wants to see the Shoebill Stork. Consequently we are travelling to both Bangweulu Swamps and Kasanka (on the way to Bangweulu).

    For those of you who have been to those destinations, are both conducive to spending 4-5 days and exploring the areas?

    We are not box-tickers, nor adrenaline junkies and are quite happy to spend time relaxing and reading. But it would also be wonderful if both Kasanka and Bangweulu allow for some driving around and exploring.

    I would really appreciate your feedback - thank you.


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Ljubljana, Slovenia
    Age
    56
    Posts
    884
    Thanked: 780

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Yes, 4 to 5 days in each of Kasanka and Bangweulu will be just right. This would allow for relaxing stay, as well as extensive exploring of the parks. If in August, prepare for possibly quite long and exhaustive trek in searching for shoebill.
    24 hours in a day.... 24 beer in a case.... Coincidence?
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    My blog: Our African Ramblings (https://safaribug.wordpress.com/)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by ortelius View Post
    Yes, 4 to 5 days in each of Kasanka and Bangweulu will be just right. This would allow for relaxing stay, as well as extensive exploring of the parks. If in August, prepare for possibly quite long and exhaustive trek in searching for shoebill.

    Thanks for your response Ortelius. I feel that it is a long way to travel for Kasanka and Bangweulu, but I want to give those two places our proper attention if 5 days each is worth it, instead of trying to cover too much ground like South Luangwa etc.


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Age
    50
    Posts
    274
    Thanked: 142

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    We have been to Kasanka in November 2019, for the bat migration.

    I wouldn´t spend several days there outside the bat season.

    We did not encounter a lot of animals beside a few antelopes and birds. It is a nice park but game is very skittish.

    What about Mutinondo? I have not been there yet, but it seems to offer at least some hiking opportunities.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Ljubljana, Slovenia
    Age
    56
    Posts
    884
    Thanked: 780

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Partly agree with Mabe regarding the length of stay in Kasanka. Five days might be a bit long, but only if you want to constantly drive around, looking for animals. On the other hand, if you would like to have couple of days of just relaxing, Kasanka is an excellent choice.

    We have been there in August, so outside of bat season. Have been camping at Pontoon campsite, with main wish to see sitatungas. And indeed, they came out in the open just in front of our campsite both evenings. Have spent only two nights there, but that was certainly too short period. If I'd have ample time, I'd certainly stay at least 4 nights. Climbing to tree platforms and having that fantastic views over the reeds in the morning mist and evening golden lights is something that stays with you forever. And to properly cover most of the tracks in the park, two days already gone. Then two days of just lazing around at the campsite, lurking for sitatungas and other bucks right from your camping chair, plus occasional visit to Wasa Lodge for a cold one - that would just be the cherry on the top.

    But yes, I agree with Mutinondo suggestion. Haven't been there yet, but it's certainly on our bucket list.

    Blog entry from our visit to Kasanka in 2016: https://safaribug.wordpress.com/2018...-2016-kasanka/
    24 hours in a day.... 24 beer in a case.... Coincidence?
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    My blog: Our African Ramblings (https://safaribug.wordpress.com/)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,524
    Thanked: 1008

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    I haven’t been to Kasanka, but Mutinondo would be a lovely place to spend five nights. Especially if you camped at the large site which has its own banda and gorgeous views (inevitably this site is more expensive). The birding is excellent at Mutinondo: plus great walks, swimming in the pools and waterfalls, and sundowners on rocks. It would be an excellent place to catch up on things like laundry plus reading and relaxing. Then you can take the easier route to Bangweulu which goes through Lavushi Manda NP.

    Bangweulu is an awesome place. Camping on the huge open floodplain is one of the best places we have camped throughout Africa. There is enough to do there to keep everyone very happy.

    There is an excellent Zambian trip report by some serious birders on the Safaritalk forum. They didn’t camp, but stayed at Mutinondo and at Kasanka. They regretted only doing a day trip to Bangweulu from Kasanka - and seriously regretted the intrepid route they took there via Lake Wakawaka.
    Last edited by Wazungu Wawili; 2020/02/05 at 06:37 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Ljubljana, Slovenia
    Age
    56
    Posts
    884
    Thanked: 780

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    I belive this is the trip report that WW had in mind: https://www.safaritalk.net/topic/205...s-and-mammals/
    24 hours in a day.... 24 beer in a case.... Coincidence?
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    My blog: Our African Ramblings (https://safaribug.wordpress.com/)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Lisbon
    Age
    55
    Posts
    347
    Thanked: 208

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    I agree with all the above. We have been at both Kasanka and Bangweulu, on separate trips but both in October. At Kasanka we witnessed the Bat migration, indeed a must see. Kasanka is a beautiful park but with a tight vegetation becoming hard to spot any wildlife. But please do not take this a deterrent to visit Kasanka. My opinion is 3 full days would be enough.

    You can easily spend 5 days at Bangweulu. Indeed a magical place with plenty to see and explore. Beware that you would probably need the help of a guide to explore the park as navigation can be tricky and troublesome. Certainly Godfrey will be there to assist you. As WW mentioned, the approach through the Lavushi Manda NP Road will be the easiest and fastest.

    Although we have not been (yet) at Mutinondo, it surely sits hight on our priorities on a future Zambian trip, and afaik birding is spectacular.

    Happy planning!

    AP
    Last edited by apfac; 2020/02/06 at 12:43 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by Mabe View Post
    We have been to Kasanka in November 2019, for the bat migration.

    I wouldn´t spend several days there outside the bat season.

    We did not encounter a lot of animals beside a few antelopes and birds. It is a nice park but game is very skittish.

    What about Mutinondo? I have not been there yet, but it seems to offer at least some hiking opportunities.

    Great suggestion Mabe, thank you very much. I will research this immediately


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by ortelius View Post
    I belive this is the trip report that WW had in mind: https://www.safaritalk.net/topic/205...s-and-mammals/



    Great!! Thanks for the link.


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    I haven’t been to Kasanka, but Mutinondo would be a lovely place to spend five nights. Especially if you camped at the large site which has its own banda and gorgeous views (inevitably this site is more expensive). The birding is excellent at Mutinondo: plus great walks, swimming in the pools and waterfalls, and sundowners on rocks. It would be an excellent place to catch up on things like laundry plus reading and relaxing. Then you can take the easier route to Bangweulu which goes through Lavushi Manda NP.

    Bangweulu is an awesome place. Camping on the huge open floodplain is one of the best places we have camped throughout Africa. There is enough to do there to keep everyone very happy.

    There is an excellent Zambian trip report by some serious birders on the Safaritalk forum. They didn’t camp, but stayed at Mutinondo and at Kasanka. They regretted only doing a day trip to Bangweulu from Kasanka - and seriously regretted the intrepid route they took there via Lake Wakawaka.


    Wonderful feedback WW - and especially as we have a really serious birder coming with on the trip, I will most certainly follow through on Mutinondo. Thank you!


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by apfac View Post
    I agree with all the above. We have been at both Kasanka and Bangweulu, on separate trips but both in October. At Kasanka we witnessed the Bat migration, indeed a must see. Kasanka is a beautiful park but with a tight vegetation becoming hard to spot any wildlife. But please do not take this a deterrent to visit Kasanka. My opinion is 3 full days would be enough.

    You can easily spend 5 days at Bangweulu. Indeed a magical place with plenty to see and explore. Beware that you would probably need the help of a guide to explore the park as navigation can be tricky and troublesome. Certainly Godfrey will be there to assist you. As WW mentioned, the approach through the Lavushi Manda NP Road will be the easiest and fastest.

    Although we have not been (yet) at Mutinondo, it surely sits hight on our priorities on a future Zambian trip, and afaik birding is spectacular.

    Happy planning!

    AP


    Thank you Apfac! I am grateful for the positive feedback on Bangweulu. We are going in August for the Shoebill and your recommendation is appreciated.


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    East London
    Age
    66
    Posts
    4,685
    Thanked: 3737

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Ysterhout, I must share that I would try to time a visit to this attractive region of Zambia, closer to early July than later in August, if at all possible.

    For your birder companion, seeing a shoebill in the Bangweulu Wetlands will be more likely and less of a schlep closer to the end of the rainy season, owing to the receding water levels later in the year. Other than the shoebill there is great birding during a dug-out canoe outing on the swamps. In Bangweulu the impressive herds of black lechwe are wonderful to see in their numbers on the exposed and drier flood plains. We stayed at Nsobe Community campsite there, extremely friendly and helpful staff at this rustic campsite. To the extent that they cart hot water for your showers, at the requested time daily; also flush toilets. Support the proposal that this area is worth approaching via Lavushi Manda Game Reserve. Also support that Mutinondo, not too far away, warrents a visit for birding and hiking. I would suggest 3 days or so for each.

    Kasanka is lovely, but the main reason for visiting is to see the migratory fruit bats from mid-October to mid-December. Here is probably the best opportunity anywhere to see the shy and rare sitatunga antelope, in the swampland. Pontoon campsite would probably be the best. The birds will be very similar to those in Bangweulu and Mutinondo. I personally would again split the 10 days you have put aside for this general area into thirds, more or less; 3 days Kasanka. All of this lovely region, other than the wetlands, is miombo woodland.
    Last edited by Stan Weakley; 2020/02/07 at 10:29 AM.
    Landcruiser 76SW.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    At least "Once a year go someplace you have never been before" Delai Lama.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    Ysterhout, I must share that I would try to time a visit to this attractive region of Zambia, closer to early July than later in August, if at all possible.

    For your birder companion, seeing a shoebill in the Bangweulu Wetlands will be more likely and less of a schlep closer to the end of the rainy season, owing to the receding water levels later in the year. Other than the shoebill there is great birding during a dug-out canoe outing on the swamps. In Bangweulu the impressive herds of black lechwe are wonderful to see in their numbers on the exposed and drier flood plains. We stayed at Nsobe Community campsite there, extremely friendly and helpful staff at this rustic campsite. To the extent that they cart hot water for your showers, at the requested time daily; also flush toilets. Support the proposal that this area is worth approaching via Lavushi Manda Game Reserve. Also support that Mutinondo, not too far away, warrents a visit for birding and hiking. I would suggest 3 days or so for each.

    Kasanka is lovely, but the main reason for visiting is to see the migratory fruit bats from mid-October to mid-December. Here is probably the best opportunity anywhere to see the shy and rare sitatunga antelope, in the swampland. Pontoon campsite would probably be the best. The birds will be very similar to those in Bangweulu and Mutinondo. I personally would again split the 10 days you have put aside for this general area into thirds, more or less; 3 days Kasanka. All of this lovely region, other than the wetlands, is miombo woodland.

    Really lovely feedback Stan - thank you. An important takeaway from this is to perhaps do the trip three weeks earlier. I will consult my travelling companions. Renewed thanks!


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,524
    Thanked: 1008

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    We were told by Mark Harvey of Kapishya that late May to early July was the best time to see a Shoebill in the Bangweulu swamps. We were there in early July 2014. This is what I wrote (edited) at the time about our “hunt for the Shoebill” - although it would appear that the Shoebill guides and rangers are more organised nowadays with long drives/walks/canoe trips to more remote areas for potential Shoebill sightings.


    Mutinondo and Bangweulu

    However, a few kilometres later, we turned off the tarmac on to the track towards Mutinondo. This was a well-maintained track to another little piece of paradise where we were warmly welcomed, shown a perfect campsite, and their staff were sent off to light the fire for hot showers. We set up camp overlooking bare granite hills protruding from the forest and later walked down to a waterfall for an invigorating swim in clear, cold water. Up here in the highlands it was cold at night and the stars were sensational.

    Our time at Mutinondo was all too short and the next morning we struck camp and headed further north. We had an easy drive until we entered the gate to the Bangweulu Wetlands. There then followed a rather nausea-inducing bucketing drive down a narrow track to the heart of the Wetlands. These Wetlands are where Livingstone died, and are now a Mecca for birding. We were now at one of the major sources of the River Congo.

    The community campsite is enchanting, covering 200 acres amongst scattered small groves of trees on the edge of the great open floodplain. Among the tree “islands” stand innumerable small grey termite mounds, giving the place the look of a rather ill-planned cemetery. The staff, who lurk in a little collection of huts on the way in, are charming and massively helpful, bicycling in with water and firewood to individual sites and to organise hot showers and water for loos in reed huts hidden in some of the groves. For the first two nights, there was a family party of keen birdwatchers from South Africa also camping, but we could only see their camp vaguely in the distance, and thereafter we had the whole place to ourselves. Perfect!

    On the plains swarm thousands of Black Lechwe (a rather graceful antelope), and at the heart lies swampland, a river and major lake. The entire area floods annually, and then, as the waters recede, so the antelope come out, and other creatures retreat with the waters into dense stands of papyrus. Among those retreating is, of course, the Shoebill. This splendid bird looks like a Walt Disney cartoon character, and is found only in occasional dense swamps from the Sudan to Zambia. Having missed it in Uganda, we were desperately keen to see it.

    To find it, we had to collect a guide from the Headquarters. The Headquarters stands on a slight rise and has a few trees. To see these from the camp is rather eerie: they look like a collection of skyscrapers due to the bending mirage effect. To reach the Headquarters is about a 5 km drive in a straight line across the plain, through the vast herds of Black Lechwe. The ground is so flat that you can almost see the curvature of the earth, and there are no roads so one just drives straight across the plain.

    On our first morning, we went for a short bird walk near the Headquarters (and a seldom used tourist camp) seeing loads of waterbirds, raptors, bee-eaters, and warblers. Later in the afternoon, we went out with the Shoebill Guide to likely sites on the edge of the papyrus swamps in search of the illusive “King Whalehead”. Hugh, A and M caught a fleeting glimpse of a Shoebill flying off, but I didn’t see it. We got back to camp as the sun was setting, put on a chicken to roast in our campfire “oven”, had hot showers, and got into warm clothes for the evening cold. The chicken was a triumph and set us up for the following day’s early morning Shoebill hunt.

    After an early morning skulk along the edge of the papyrus with the Guide, we had to admit defeat and retreated to camp for a late breakfast, another attempt at making bread on the campfire, and a lovely time doing camp chores, and reading. It is hot here during the day, but in the shade of the trees or our awning, it is delightful. We are enchanted by the Bangweulu Wetlands and have never seen anything like it before; we are also delighted with this gorgeous campsite with not another camper in sight.

    The hunt for the elusive Shoebill went on, but no avail. However, we feel that the fleeting glimpse counts as a “tick” for Twitcher Hugh. After three glorious nights in a gorgeous, unique place, we packed up and headed off into the unknown. And, boy, was it the unknown. We knew that the first two hours would be bad, but hadn’t anticipated the next four hours being even worse. But it was a fine glimpse into rural northern Zambia, and Livingstone’s route to his ultimate demise. The track (which is marked as a D road) is little more than a foot path for much of the time, with thick bush scraping the sides of the Land Rover and the underneath.
    Last edited by Wazungu Wawili; 2020/02/10 at 11:17 PM.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sandton
    Age
    61
    Posts
    241
    Thanked: 24

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    We were told by Mark Harvey of Kapishya that late May to early July was the best time to see a Shoebill in the Bangweulu swamps. We were there in early July 2014. This is what I wrote (edited) at the time about our “hunt for the Shoebill” - although it would appear that the Shoebill guides and rangers are more organised nowadays with long drives/walks/canoe trips to more remote areas for potential Shoebill sightings.


    Mutinondo and Bangweulu

    However, a few kilometres later, we turned off the tarmac on to the track towards Mutinondo. This was a well-maintained track to another little piece of paradise where we were warmly welcomed, shown a perfect campsite, and their staff were sent off to light the fire for hot showers. We set up camp overlooking bare granite hills protruding from the forest and later walked down to a waterfall for an invigorating swim in clear, cold water. Up here in the highlands it was cold at night and the stars were sensational.

    Our time at Mutinondo was all too short and the next morning we struck camp and headed further north. We had an easy drive until we entered the gate to the Bangweulu Wetlands. There then followed a rather nausea-inducing bucketing drive down a narrow track to the heart of the Wetlands. These Wetlands are where Livingstone died, and are now a Mecca for birding. We were now at one of the major sources of the River Congo.

    The community campsite is enchanting, covering 200 acres amongst scattered small groves of trees on the edge of the great open floodplain. Among the tree “islands” stand innumerable small grey termite mounds, giving the place the look of a rather ill-planned cemetery. The staff, who lurk in a little collection of huts on the way in, are charming and massively helpful, bicycling in with water and firewood to individual sites and to organise hot showers and water for loos in reed huts hidden in some of the groves. For the first two nights, there was a family party of keen birdwatchers from South Africa also camping, but we could only see their camp vaguely in the distance, and thereafter we had the whole place to ourselves. Perfect!

    On the plains swarm thousands of Black Lechwe (a rather graceful antelope), and at the heart lies swampland, a river and major lake. The entire area floods annually, and then, as the waters recede, so the antelope come out, and other creatures retreat with the waters into dense stands of papyrus. Among those retreating is, of course, the Shoebill. This splendid bird looks like a Walt Disney cartoon character, and is found only in occasional dense swamps from the Sudan to Zambia. Having missed it in Uganda, we were desperately keen to see it.

    To find it, we had to collect a guide from the Headquarters. The Headquarters stands on a slight rise and has a few trees. To see these from the camp is rather eerie: they look like a collection of skyscrapers due to the bending mirage effect. To reach the Headquarters is about a 5 km drive in a straight line across the plain, through the vast herds of Black Lechwe. The ground is so flat that you can almost see the curvature of the earth, and there are no roads so one just drives straight across the plain.

    On our first morning, we went for a short bird walk near the Headquarters (and a seldom used tourist camp) seeing loads of waterbirds, raptors, bee-eaters, and warblers. Later in the afternoon, we went out with the Shoebill Guide to likely sites on the edge of the papyrus swamps in search of the illusive “King Whalehead”. Hugh, A and M caught a fleeting glimpse of a Shoebill flying off, but I didn’t see it. We got back to camp as the sun was setting, put on a chicken to roast in our campfire “oven”, had hot showers, and got into warm clothes for the evening cold. The chicken was a triumph and set us up for the following day’s early morning Shoebill hunt.

    After an early morning skulk along the edge of the papyrus with the Guide, we had to admit defeat and retreated to camp for a late breakfast, another attempt at making bread on the campfire, and a lovely time doing camp chores, and reading. It is hot here during the day, but in the shade of the trees or our awning, it is delightful. We are enchanted by the Bangweulu Wetlands and have never seen anything like it before; we are also delighted with this gorgeous campsite with not another camper in sight.

    The hunt for the elusive Shoebill went on, but no avail. However, we feel that the fleeting glimpse counts as a “tick” for Twitcher Hugh. After three glorious nights in a gorgeous, unique place, we packed up and headed off into the unknown. And, boy, was it the unknown. We knew that the first two hours would be bad, but hadn’t anticipated the next four hours being even worse. But it was a fine glimpse into rural northern Zambia, and Livingstone’s route to his ultimate demise. The track (which is marked as a D road) is little more than a foot path for much of the time, with thick bush scraping the sides of the Land Rover and the underneath.

    What an emotive and descriptive piece of writing Wazungu! And I am most grateful too, because you well and truly wet my appetite for this portion of our trip. You echo Stan Weakley's sentiment about doing the trip earlier, which is a lovely confirmation. Thank you for taking the time to post this excellent piece!


    2011 Toyota Land Cruiser 76 S/W

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Ysterhout For This Useful Post:


  18. #17
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Mosta
    Age
    50
    Posts
    32
    Thanked: 4

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Hi

    We went in August to Bangweulu - also to see the shoebill stork. We stayed in Nkondo, near park headquarters. They have basic huts with toilets to rent and a communal kitchen.

    Then drove 2 hrs into the Bangweulu swamps to search for shoebill. Along the way you pass many isolated villages.

    It only took us less than 1 hr walk before we saw the first one. Amazing experience. You will see also many other birds and red Lechwe.

    If I would go again I would stay in Nsobe campsite. Note that the drive from Lusaka to Nsobe is very long, best that you break the drive anywhere along the great north road or maybe at Nkondo - drive Lusaka to Nkondo is nearly 10 hours.

    I think 4 nights at Nsobe would be excellent, with 3 full days to explore. Obviously the earlier you go in the season is better for Shoebills but note the high water level in the swamp. When we went in August we could drive all the way in.


    Regards

    Edward

  19. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to edc1 For This Useful Post:


  20. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    75
    Posts
    112
    Thanked: 22

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Bit off the topic. Are the original owners (also the developers) of Mutinondo still running the site? We were there in 2010 for three days (lovely place) and then again in 2014 just for a stopover.

  21. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    55
    Posts
    939
    Thanked: 290

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by Kobus P Venter View Post
    Bit off the topic. Are the original owners (also the developers) of Mutinondo still running the site? We were there in 2010 for three days (lovely place) and then again in 2014 just for a stopover.
    I think it was a Dutch couple when we were there in 2017. And I think that they were the original developers. Great place.
    2007 Disco 3 TDV6 SE
    2007 Fortuner 3.0 D4D

  22. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,713
    Thanked: 643

    Default Re: Kasanka & Bangweulu Wetlands

    Quote Originally Posted by zoneout View Post
    I think it was a Dutch couple when we were there in 2017. And I think that they were the original developers. Great place.
    They are originally from RSA and still own the place but now live in Lusaka. He used to be a geologist. Mutinondo has a manager on site. It is still a favorite of many birders and visitors from Lusaka.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •