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  1. #41
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by bobhof View Post
    I have the Garmin InReach and it's really great. I activate it only for the months I need it and the basic monthly plan is R250 per month (edit: plus R400 annually even if you don't activate the service). You get unlimited free preset messages (you set these up online and cant change them or update the recipients from the device). This allows me to send daily "all is okay" messages back to the family. Then you get 10 free sms messages, after which they cost R8.50 per message (in or out) so I only use this in emergencies and there's no idle chit chat. There is an SOS button on the side of the device. I believe Garmin will communicate with emergency services and give them your location in the event of an emergency. I've not been in in the unfortunate situation where I needed to use it, but it is nice to know it is there.
    What he said. Works brilliantly. Does depend on the person receiving the message to look at their computer. If it is an SOS then they will contact all your emergency contacts.

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by biltong View Post
    .......To call that a fatalistic attitude? Sure I agree, there is perhaps a significant element of that at stake here.
    You need to ask yourself why it was expressed in a judgmental context.
    People are welcome to their own opinions about taking responsibility for their own mishaps, risks and health. I have a very fatalistic attitude to my own health. The issue is that sometimes these fatalists land in trouble, yell for help and this results in others placing themselves at risk (or inconvenience) when feeling obliged to salvage a situation which could have been prevented or mitigated in the first place.

    If one takes the decision that minimal preparation for danger and accidental health crisis, is your chosen route, then please do not be so selfish as to expect that others go out of their way to help. That said, helpers will always be just that.

    I try my best not to be judgmental.
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  3. #43
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by lekhubu943 View Post
    ... and if something goes seriously wrong, even in the middle of the night, start driving + your partner needs to be able to drive in off road conditions.
    Specific to the area that you inquired about, this is the absolute best advice.

    As mentioned in previous posts, by the time all the red tape needed to get an AirVac into the air you would probably be in Upington before it reached you. The furthest point from Upington in the KTP is Gharagab and this could be comfortably done in under 8 hours [traveling at Park management speeds]. Your satphone would certainly be of use to describe the problem whilst activating an ambulance to meet you on the road.
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  4. #44
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    To add to Stan's excellent advice:

    A few years back a friend's daughter became seriously ill at Mana.
    He saved her life by borrowing a Sat phone and receiving expert advice and help.

    And accidents do happen in the bush.

    We always carry ours - not only for ourselves - but to help others.
    And nowadays you can hire them - you don't have to buy.

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    To answer Johan's original question regarding medical air evacuation: Okavango Air Rescue (OAR) works with the medical aids in Botswana as well as EMERGENCY ASSIST 991. EA 911 is a provider of emergency medical assistance in Botswana and will call out OAR if required. Google Emergency Assist 991 and get their contact details on their website, they cover most of Botswana in partnership with OAR. OAR operates from Maun and Gaberone and operates two PC12's and two helicopters.

  6. #46
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hylton View Post
    What he said. Works brilliantly. Does depend on the person receiving the message to look at their computer. If it is an SOS then they will contact all your emergency contacts.
    Yes it does. I think you can set up to send messages either by email or by sms. I only use the sms option because I know the recipients will see it quickly and because I worry that an email autoresponder will cost me money.

  7. #47
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Stan used the term "prepare adequately" and Biltong highlighted "preparation".

    The evacuation part of "preparation" is been dealt with here, so I would not want to hijack the thread.

    As we are once again venturing into the quieter part of KTP, the question once again pops up: What is "adequately" to a person that is not medically trained, in terms of medication and other provisions (I am not referring to the Panados and prescription stuff)? Similar to the "packing lists" that pop up every now and then?

    I have seen this topic being discussed previously but cannot find it now.

    Could this please not be made into a sticky, due to the importance and relevance of the topic?

    OK, my bad. I see that the topic is a sticky under "Overlanding" I missed it since I mostly dwell in the "Camping" section.
    Last edited by hatjohan; 2020/01/14 at 01:32 PM.



  8. #48
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by hatjohan View Post
    ... What is "adequately" to a person that is not medically trained, in terms of medication and other provisions (I am not referring to the Panados and prescription stuff)? ..
    Yes good question. We really need a list of basic things and maybe quantities there-off.

    I would like to have some sort of indication that I need to have at least 6 of X type of bandages in Y size.

    When lists start including things like syringes and bags of saline solution, I loose interest and it gets too complicated. Personally I think for the layman travelling to places like KTP and more well developed countries like Botswana and Namibia, these items are superfluous and take unnecessary space. But.... I could be wrong.
    Last edited by lekhubu943; 2020/01/14 at 09:55 AM.
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  9. #49
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    As a starting point, there are a lot a good articles/videos on Google/Youtube concerning First Aid kits, IFAK, Trauma kits, Boo-Boo kits etc. by the Overlanding/4x4/Prepper communities/experts.

    Most Overlanding/4x4/Prepper/Camping/Pharmacy/Survival/Outdoor stores/online stores sell from basic to very advanced kits.
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  10. #50
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    For those wanting to review their disaster planning prior to an overland trip to isolated destinations, the following series of posts from this forum is as comprehensive a place to begin as can be found. They are not new but remain applicable.


    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...d-Kit-Contents

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...es-in-the-bush

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...sh-emergencies

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...and-infections

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...al-Tips-Part-1

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...al-Tips-Part-2
    Landcruiser 76SW.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

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    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

  11. #51
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by lekhubu943 View Post
    When lists start including things like syringes and bags of saline solution, I loose interest and it gets too complicated. Personally I think for the layman travelling to places like KTP and more well developed countries like Botswana and Namibia, these items are superfluous and take unnecessary space. But.... I could be wrong.
    Yes, but.... When we travel, we do carry medical basics like syringes, drip kits, sterile gloves etc - not for us to use, but for medically trained people in remote areas to use on us (or others) if needed. I don't necessarily trust that the basics will be sterile or not previously used in an impoverished, rural clinic, which may lack the basics, but could well have a community health worker present who has basic paramedic training. We carry several packs of sterile gloves in case we have to administer emergency care to road accident or other victims, and have had to use them several times in our travels.
    The above does not necessarily apply to a place like the Kgalagadi NP, but still, I would prefer the peace of mind of having sterile gloves if I have to assist an injured, bleeding person there who might well be HIV positive (we also carry packs of condoms, but those are used for waterproofing HT cables for water crossings and as emergency water bags!)
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  12. #52
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    For those wanting to review their disaster planning prior to an overland trip to isolated destinations, the following series of posts from this forum is as comprehensive a place to begin as can be found. They are not new but remain applicable.


    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...d-Kit-Contents

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...es-in-the-bush

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...sh-emergencies

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...and-infections

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...al-Tips-Part-1

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...al-Tips-Part-2
    Thanks Stan, those are the ones I reffered to.

    Now how do we get them to be a sticky? Mods?
    Last edited by hatjohan; 2020/01/14 at 12:55 PM.



  13. #53
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Stan used the term "prepare adequately" and Biltong highlighted "preparation".

    The evacuation part of "preparation" is been dealt with here, so I would not want to hijack the thread.

    As we are once again venturing into the quieter part of KTP, the question once again pops up: What is "adequately" to a person that is not medically trained, in terms of medication and other provisions (I am not referring to the Panados and prescription stuff)? Similar to the "packing lists" that pop up every now and then?

    I have seen this topic being discussed previously but cannot find it now.

    Could this please not be made into a sticky, due to the importance and relevance of the topic?

    OK, my bad. I see that the topic is a sticky under "Overlanding" I missed it since I mostly dwell in the "Camping" section.
    Last edited by hatjohan; 2020/01/14 at 01:33 PM.



  14. #54
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Dold View Post
    To add to Stan's excellent advice:

    A few years back a friend's daughter became seriously ill at Mana.
    He saved her life by borrowing a Sat phone and receiving expert advice and help.

    And accidents do happen in the bush.

    We always carry ours - not only for ourselves - but to help others.
    And nowadays you can hire them - you don't have to buy.

    This is a really interesting discussion and thanks to the OP for raising the topic. I guess one of the key questions asked by Stan is whether or not an air evacuation is necessary or even possible in a given situation. Being able to talk to an experienced doctor will be critical to that decision. While agreeing with Stan that one should not depend on others, a point not mentioned sufficiently here is the "buddy system". We don't travel with every possible piece of kit, but we are very well equipped to handle most things. We have helped others. And others have helped us. Once travelling with a group of 4 vehicles, we had one Satphone between the 4 of us. Speaking of which, I wonder how many Satphones are floating around KTP at any one time? And VHF radios? And on the SA side of KTP at least you are sure to see another vehicle within 30 minutes max on most roads. The 3 main camps will themselves surely have all manner of communications available.
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  15. #55
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    For those wanting to review their disaster planning prior to an overland trip to isolated destinations, the following series of posts from this forum is as comprehensive a place to begin as can be found. They are not new but remain applicable.


    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...d-Kit-Contents

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...es-in-the-bush

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...sh-emergencies

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...and-infections

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...al-Tips-Part-1

    https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...al-Tips-Part-2

    Hi Stan,

    Thanks for summarizing these links, very helpfull.

    Cheers

    Johan

  16. #56
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    The question as to which medical supplies to carry, begs.

    This question equates with what vehicle spares one should carry. No immediate and all-encompasing answer is possible. At times the item left out is the one most needed.

    Both of these would have simple answers if space, weight and purchase prices were not an issue. Gary's "Must Have – Essential Items" would cost an estimated R5-10,000 and if the "Good to Have and Nice to Have" items are included, the purhase price could range from R20,000-R100,000 depending on purchasing full paramedic equipment. Most, even rural medical staff, could not uitilize any sophisticated kit.

    Carry a "Must-Have" first aid kit
    plus also a few of the "Good to have" items, which locals might not have but would use - sterile needles, sutures, syringes, i.v. cannulae and a couple of litre bags of i.v. saline. Especially far north of our borders.

    What exactly you end up carrying relies on decent and specific planning, research, your personal abilities and personal circumstances.

    A well stocked bag of common sense is the most important.
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    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    At least "Once a year go someplace you have never been before" Delai Lama.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

  17. #57
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Weakley View Post
    Carry a "Must-Have" first aid kit
    plus also a few of the "Good to have" items, which locals might not have but would use - sterile needles, sutures, syringes, i.v. cannulae and a couple of litre bags of i.v. saline. Especially far north of our borders.
    Thanks Stan, I checked what I have against those lists again and have most of it. My medication differs slightly. I agree that stuff like needles, syringes and saline should be included for countries north of Botswana.
    Last edited by lekhubu943; 2020/01/15 at 07:28 AM.
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  18. #58
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Thanks to Stan and others about preparation and kit. Thanks for the SPOT / InReach comments as well. The Garmin InReach is at least double the price of the SPOT unit as far as I can see but it does offer a number of other features. Is this correct and can anyone advise preferred supplier for the SPOT? Garmin is widely available.

  19. #59
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    Quote Originally Posted by mudgrubber View Post
    The Garmin InReach is at least double the price of the SPOT unit as far as I can see but it does offer a number of other features. Is this correct and can anyone advise preferred supplier for the SPOT? Garmin is widely available.
    I'm very happy with my SpotX. What's great about spot is you can choose a month-to-month subscription plan and only have to pay a yearly activation fee (and GEOS of course) ie. you don't pay an activation fee every time you activate again, only the monthly fee for the period you need. You can buy online from FindMeSpot https://africa.findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=666 or Mantality https://www.mantality.co.za/spot-x-gps-tracker.html

    Not sponsored

    PS. SpotX vs. InReach https://youtu.be/SRgUQf9hnC0
    Last edited by Christoff; 2020/01/15 at 07:44 AM.

  20. #60
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    Default Re: Air rescue Kgalagadi national park.

    I suppose as we get older we get more concerned about our safety. I'm only 43ish and am already looking into devices to keep in touch when Swambo and I bugger off into the middle of nowhere. I never used to care for such things when I was younger, but this was probably because such devices, that were affordable for the man in the street didn't exist yet. Now that they do, I can't see any harm in using them. We've already done a bit of SA Kgalagadi, but would like to venture deeper into it next time, then also Central Kalahari, Kaokoland etc. We've been to The Rockies in Canada, but stayed mostly on the beaten track. Next time I'm keen to venture deep into The Yukon territory and Alaska.

    The only thing to still consider is who you're actually going to sms/call and what can they do about it. This goes for both mechanical and medical. When driving overland trucks there were plenty times I had problems and could have called base, but by the time they could have sent help I could have fixed it myself, so I did. The rest of the time I spent checking my truck to the best of my ability to make sure it didn't break down in the first place.

    If all else fails, at least we can tell our loved ones where to find our bodies.
    Last edited by Naes-Landy; 2020/01/15 at 10:28 AM.
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