Foot and mouth outbreak - Page 2





Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    42
    Posts
    12,269
    Thanked: 1005

    Default Re: Foot and mouth outbreak

    Quote Originally Posted by Zapiture View Post
    But the fact is no abattoir will buy right now.


    Koop daai kersfees skaap boudjie sommer nou al!
    Everything is a hammer.
    Unless it is a screw driver.

    Then it it a chisel.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mokopane
    Age
    50
    Posts
    1,048
    Thanked: 183

    Default Re: Foot and mouth outbreak

    If you think this outbreak is because of the informal trade/farmers, you are very wrong. Our biggest problem is that Feedlots that have been quarintined (where did they buy those animals from?) can't move their cattle to the abbatoirs for slaughter. Remember the meat and milk is fine and safe to consume. FMD also does not kill the animal it takes a few days for the symptoms to pass. In these days, I think it is 3 days, the animal does not eat and loses weight and that, is costly to the beef industry. The outbreak causes economic loss and that is what makes it so dangerous. These animals that heal will then spread the virus mostly by licking each other or drinking from the same water so it is fairly easy to prevent it from spreading by implementing good bio-security measures.We are lucky to still be able to move animals around, just need to follow sound practices when doing so.
    Die reŽn is 'n dag nader as gister.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    958
    Thanked: 788

    Default Re: Foot and mouth outbreak

    4 December 2019

    JOINT STATEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE FMD TECHNICAL TASK TEAM ON THE FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE OUTBREAK LIMPOPO

    Progress has been reported consistently over the past four weeks since the outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Molemole. To date, 11 commercial properties have been found to be infected and confirmed positive: Seven in Capricorn, two in Vhembe and two in Mopani district municipalities. There are an estimated 14 000 cattle on the infected properties, which include five feedlots and six commercial breeding farms. All affected properties have been linked directly or indirectly to cattle sold at auctions. Further follow-up investigation and sampling is still being conducted to determine the extent of the outbreak.

    The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development gazetted a national ban on the gathering of cloven-hoofed animals, including livestock auctions, shows and similar activities. The gazette is available on the DAFF website https://www.daff.gov.za/daffweb3/Home/Foot-and-mouth

    According to Section 11 of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35) it is the responsibility of ďany owner or manager of land on which there are animals to take all reasonable steps to prevent the infection of the animals with any animal disease, or parasite and the spreading thereof from the relevant land or animalsĒ.

    Anyone spreading FMD through the movement of animals may, therefore, be held civilly and or criminally liable for such an offence.

    All suspected and infected properties have been placed under quarantine and no livestock is allowed to move in, through or out of the affected properties. Immediate neighbouring properties have also been placed under quarantine. Quarantine on the suspected and neighbouring properties will be lifted as soon as it has been proven that all animals on these properties are free of FMD. The owners of infected properties have been given slaughter out options to facilitate depopulation.

    As per the press release of 19 November 2019, all owners of livestock are encouraged to observe strict biosecurity measures on their premises. The biosecurity guidelines are available on the National Animal Health Forum website www.nahf.co.za.

    It is important that all livestock owners familiarise themselves with the following measures to prevent their animals from being infected:

    • Not moving high risk animals;
    • Only buying animals from a proven source;
    • Insisting on a veterinary attestation/health declaration to accompany any animals that are brought in.
    One of the stupid mistakes in life is to underestimate peoples level of stupidity!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •