RTTs and weight - Page 2





Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 40 of 40

Thread: RTTs and weight

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gauteng
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanked: 923

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandboarder View Post
    Anton I've been considering this exact setup on my 130 just as these vehicles quickly get overloaded due to the available bin space.
    Luckily I've got some height to play with due to the Defenders high roof.

    If I may add, it might be better to have the RTT right up against the cab to be more streamline and have the weight over the axles instead of behind.
    The weight of the fuel and water jerries will vary as your trip continues but the RTT's weight will stay the same.
    This is now only relevant if your RTT folds over to the side and not the back.
    Sorry for the lengthy response, however I need to give some background to my decisions.

    I had the RTT on the Everest. To curb weight and not buy an expensive roof rack, I mounted tent only on Thule bars and used this for about a year with no issues. The space in the Everest is limited and I felt too sorry for a brand new car to start fiddling too much. This is my second vehicle since I have a full use company car and wanted something I can turn the key and off I go, everything packed and ready all the time. I decided to get rid of the Everest also because it did not fit in the garage wit the RTT on and I got sick and tired of upping and downing that tent from the roof before and after trips.

    Doing the layouts for the bakkie, I had to fit the lot where it could. The tent is only 36-38kg's, if that, and no roof rack under it, so weight to a minimum. I designed 4 custom brackets to mount the RTT, and that is on the cattle rails through the canvas and sealed up the small through holes again.

    Because of the tent dimensions, jerry can and water holder sizes, I chose (forced) to turn the tent to open towards the back. If I had turned the tents' long side linear with the load bin to open to the side, then either the jerry/water holders overhang the back or the tent overhang the back. I did not want that. I made quite a few scale layouts with dimensions to ensure everything fits.

    I am glad to say it was all within a few cm's and glad I fiddled so long with the layouts. I also had to allow space between jerry/water holders for the RTT cover, to wrap over the tent. There was no other way. I couldn't stand that tent overhang at the back.

    Even with the RTT open, I still have good access to the load-bin and the cargo drawer slide out fully. The table and solar panels are mounted in such a way that I have access to either very easily. There was also the Bundu Canopy that needed to go somewhere and I designed a custom frame to mount that on and is being made as we speak. I am still avoiding any roof rack.

    My weight fully loaded now comes to about 550kg including a tank of fuel, and that includes the battery and fridge inside the bakkie behind the seats. The weight is spread as good as I could, I think.

    I know there might be other ways to have done it but the functionality works for me at this stage. I will see where I stand and what needs to be modified when I return from my next long trip.



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ranger Dunn.jpg 
Views:	172 
Size:	420.0 KB 
ID:	540470
    Last edited by AntonN; 2019/09/12 at 08:56 AM.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to AntonN For This Useful Post:


  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gauteng
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanked: 923

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by niclemaitre View Post
    Thanks, unfortunately, I've already got a full height canopy on the bak, so that's not an option.
    I considered the full height canopy however the lot doesn't fit in the garage with RTT on top. I posted a bit of a ramble to explain my thinking process behind this.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to AntonN For This Useful Post:


  5. #23
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Ruimsig
    Age
    55
    Posts
    3,905
    Thanked: 3437

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by niclemaitre View Post
    I've been idly looking at RTTs to stick on the bakkie and one thing really astounds me is the weight of the things. I get that they need some kind of load bearing floor, but seriously, even the "Featherlite" from Frontrunner weighs 43 kg. I come from a hiking background and have tents that have survived 150 km/h winds and torrential rain, sleep two in comfort with extra space and come in around 3-4kgs.

    Why are they so insanely heavy? And that weight is located at the worst place, high up on the vehicle.

    I'm considering a piece of plywood and just pitching one of the tents on it.
    There is a YT couple in Panama or Porto Rico that have done just that. Modified their roof-rack to accommodate a bog standard dome tent. Its worth investigating.

    They carry it in the vehicle and then just pitch it when they need to.
    There is no such thing as inclement weather, only poor selection of clothing.... or Vehicle

    2010 Hummer H3 5.3lt V8, 300 HP, FDL, RDL, CDL, TC and 4:1 Low Range

    Discovery and Range Rovers: SOLD: enough is enough

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Estee For This Useful Post:


  7. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Alberton
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,024
    Thanked: 2469

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    @ AntonN

    that really is a well thought out solution.
    Lusted for a Landy but the Pajero was sexier and bigger in the right departments, just like my Missus.

    2004 Gen 3. 3.8i petrol V6 (PAJTU)
    X Factor Bundutop trailer (designed by me)
    1998 Blister Fender Pajero 3500 24V (PAJ) (Sold)
    BMW R1200R

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Stranger For This Useful Post:


  9. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gauteng
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanked: 923

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by Stranger View Post
    @ AntonN

    that really is a well thought out solution.
    Thanks very much.

    I am sure this will not work for everyone. Since I travel alone, this is a great way to be compact with the least weight and spread out as best I could. Considering functionality as best I could, to reach anything I need with the least unpacking and digging.
    All my stuff stays in the car and always ready to travel, that was the plan.

    Just pack cameras, perishables and clothes.

    Now to find the time to go and enjoy......

  10. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gauteng
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanked: 923

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Feedback:

    Bundu Canopy is on the frame and mounted.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190914_113740.jpg 
Views:	122 
Size:	1.04 MB 
ID:	540800

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190914_113800.jpg 
Views:	108 
Size:	931.4 KB 
ID:	540801

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AntonN For This Useful Post:


  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gauteng
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanked: 923

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Camping and sleeping in 15 minutes....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	RTT-ALL.jpg 
Views:	102 
Size:	1.32 MB 
ID:	540807   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Side_RTT.jpg 
Views:	101 
Size:	1.23 MB 
ID:	540808   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Drawer_RTT.jpg 
Views:	107 
Size:	1.11 MB 
ID:	540809  

  13. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to AntonN For This Useful Post:


  14. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    45
    Posts
    306
    Thanked: 74

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Jip, about 10 minutes from stop to first beer


  15. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Gothan For This Useful Post:


  16. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Age
    61
    Posts
    5,339
    Thanked: 1745

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    To start off, Anton I think you have an ideal set up for a soft top, practical, easy to set up and economical. One point that has not been mentioned is the extra drag and wind resistance. Having a softie up above your roof line is hectic on your fuel consumption especially if it is flappy.

    Name:  Budget Overlanding.jpg
Views: 375
Size:  84.1 KB


    My take on this whole discussion is what works the easiest for the camper, I camp I don't squat. The softie is all well and fine until it gets put on top of a SUV or something of similar height. My last camp with my softie was in PE for just under a month. Even the PE export quality wind did nothing to the tent, had it been a polly oxford or similar plastic bag tent I am not so sure it would have stood up to the task. Climbing up and down was no issue with the only bit of an issue is how to maintain your dignity when descending first thing in the morning Parking the vehicle carefully sorted this issue.

    Disadvantages with the softie is the issues with opening and pitching after a day's driving and striking the next morning before going on a drive. The main issue is working up 2, odd meters and running around the vehicle to tie everything down again. It got to the stage that I went out and bought a small aluminium step ladder to help with the height. When it was mounted on the mini these issues were not a problem. Next is going in to a restricted parking and I don't mean under cover, normal open air lots often have height restriction to stop cargo vehicles entering.

    The solid top units are much easier to pitch, either loosen the clips at the back and let the gas struts do their thing or even better just press a button. The Bundu top is a great product, Jen and I were next to them at the LA sport expo and on the Friday I said to Jen that this contraption is not going to last until the end of Saturday never ming the Sunday......I was wrong, This megafter was up and down like a jack in the box the whole time and come Sunday I went to go have a look at all the damage to the unit................nothing. It was operated many more times over that weekend than it would be in the course of a normal lifetime.

    The clamshell units are also ideal for me because it is a hard smooth surface that has less resistance and a lower profile so it is not as harsh on fuel consumption. Bonus part is that you can leave the bedding inside on most of them making it easier to tour or go on early game drives.

    Why not use lighter materials, I can write a book about this but do you want this in the phodie below even if it is on a piece of ply on top of the SUV

    Name:  Gert du Toit se baai 011e.jpg
Views: 387
Size:  568.5 KB


    Building one yourself is easy as, main thing is the tools, my next project will be a Clamshell, still on top of the Pajero but easier to pitch and strike
    Henk
    Adventure is out there go find it

    Fitment and trailer service. Agent for SnoMaster & Tentco
    Follow us on Facebook

  17. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to hbannink For This Useful Post:


  18. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cape Town, Plumstead
    Age
    55
    Posts
    747
    Thanked: 100

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    I'm with Henk on this one .............

    Been camping most of my life , from school days to today still.

    Never used to have a problem with pitching a dome tent, very easy but gets a bit too much once you start overlanding and moving camp frequently, often daily.

    So friends were selling their rooftop tent, one of the featherlite versions - what a difference !
    No sand walked into the tent, nice to watch the hyenas etc from up top too.
    Packing up in the morning was a breeze, but you soon learn to do it first thing in the morning especially if you are travelling solo - because you will have to shower again after folding the tent away and zipping up the cover, dust is a bugger.
    Ditto in the evening. But still a better solution.

    Also if you camp in the colder parts of the year as I do then the final bit of packing away is hell on your cold/frozen fingers.
    Not so much fun when you have to pack away daily for a game drive ............
    If you don't have undercover parking the cover does not last long if your tent is permanently mounted, I'm on my second one and it does not look so great any more.

    So now I look at my fellow travellers with their popup tents / canopies / clamshells / Bundutops - so much easier, faster and cleaner

    Guess whet I am in the market for ?
    Safe Diving

    Andy

    2013 Isuzu KB6 300 DC 4X4

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrews_underwater_images/

  19. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AndyT For This Useful Post:


  20. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Gauteng
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanked: 923

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by hbannink View Post
    To start off, Anton I think you have an ideal set up for a soft top, practical, easy to set up and economical. One point that has not been mentioned is the extra drag and wind resistance. Having a softie up above your roof line is hectic on your fuel consumption especially if it is flappy.

    ...............................
    I had this tent on top of the Everest and I must say was very surprised with fuel consumption. Headwind was the worst however at 115km/h I still got sub 10l/100km with the 2.2 XLS 4x4 Everest. It had some effect on the fuel consumption but not as bad as I had expected. Maybe the Thule bars helped? Best I have seen with the tent on the roof was 9,2l/100km on the Everest, worst was 9.8l/100km, pump to pump. Without the tent I got 8.7-8.9l/100km.

    I really gave this "build" a lot of thought and happy so far. I am sure once I get into the outdoors, there might be some things I want to adapt, I'll see. At least now everything can stay on the bakkie and fit in the garage. With the Everest I had to take the tent off after every trip. It was a real pain.

    I will ground tent but only when I stay in one place for some days, then it is nice to have a "base camp" to come back to. Thanks for the comment and let's see how it goes.
    Last edited by AntonN; 2019/09/15 at 06:56 AM.

  21. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Harrismith
    Age
    34
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 266

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by hbannink View Post
    Why not use lighter materials, I can write a book about this but do you want this in the phodie below even if it is on a piece of ply on top of the SUV

    Name:  Gert du Toit se baai 011e.jpg
Views: 387
Size:  568.5 KB


    Building one yourself is easy as, main thing is the tools, my next project will be a Clamshell, still on top of the Pajero but easier to pitch and strike
    I have a tent that I have spent weeks in in some of the worst weather that the Southern Ocean can throw at you. Winds of 150 km/h plus and heavy driving rain and it stood up to it fine. Tents don't have to weigh >20kgs to be strong and durable. They just need to be properly designed. (And Camp Master is not an example of that!)

    I look at the the RTTs (both soft and hardshell) and it's like the manufacturers have never bothered to look at good quality hiking tents and what their designers are doing. That Gen3 Alucab hardshell tent, you have to crawl across the doors to get inside. Why they don't have the zips coming from the side in the shape of a "D" like most hiking tents is beyond me.

    If I build a clamshell, I'll just need to find someone to TIG the seams of the bent alu plate.

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to niclemaitre For This Useful Post:


  23. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Age
    61
    Posts
    5,339
    Thanked: 1745

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by niclemaitre View Post
    I have a tent that I have spent weeks in in some of the worst weather that the Southern Ocean can throw at you. Winds of 150 km/h plus and heavy driving rain and it stood up to it fine. Tents don't have to weigh >20kgs to be strong and durable. They just need to be properly designed. (And Camp Master is not an example of that!)

    I look at the the RTTs (both soft and hardshell) and it's like the manufacturers have never bothered to look at good quality hiking tents and what their designers are doing. That Gen3 Alucab hardshell tent, you have to crawl across the doors to get inside. Why they don't have the zips coming from the side in the shape of a "D" like most hiking tents is beyond me.

    If I build a clamshell, I'll just need to find someone to TIG the seams of the bent alu plate.
    Hiking vs rtt - two different fields altogether, if you are in 150km/hr winds on the southern seas you are in survival mode as far as I am concerned not appreciating the comfort and great design of the back packers tent you are in.
    Manufacturers do not look at hiking tents for inspiration when it comes to doors, you are right on this one, entry is usually through a much larger aperture and customer demand has driven the combination of gauze closing from the top down and solid panel from the bottom up to the popular layout. When you are on top of your vehicle you are at eye level and prone to invasion of privacy by passers by. Not being on the south seas and in 150km/hr winds but rather in 30+ deg of heat one usually needs some ventilation. The mozzie gauze closing from the top allows you to close it fully keeping the creepy crawlies out and allowing you to close the solid flap from the bottom up allows you to maintain dignity by half closing it and still allowing ventilation on top.

    As I have said building a rtt or clamshell is easy I can even TIG my own alu box
    Henk
    Adventure is out there go find it

    Fitment and trailer service. Agent for SnoMaster & Tentco
    Follow us on Facebook

  24. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Walker Bay
    Age
    76
    Posts
    9,068
    Thanked: 1022

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    For me simplicity of clamshell all the way particularly when I see couples having to run around erecting their elaborate canvas RTT's.

    Lions at the waterhole and you can be ready to drive within a minute or two. And overnighting is a real pleasure. I could not imagine having to pitch canvas tents ground or RTT mounted repeatedly as one travels north to a destination. What a chore!

    Disadvantages - they usually have less space than the canvas variety and this could be an important factor for Swambo's.

    Elsewhere I would certainly look at the slick Bundutop although common sense tells me pulleys and ropes may not be ideal for bush ventures.

    ďAfrica changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  25. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Posts
    677
    Thanked: 250

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    I have a fibreglass clamshell Hannibal Impi that I picked up on Gumtree a few years ago :

    https://www.hannibal.co.za/Roof-Tent...Impi-Roof-Tent

    I have it on Thule bars which handle it quite well, but sometimes it shifts a bit on rough terrain.

    It is very nice but it is a bit heavy, my slightly older model comes in at about 80kg.

    Very comfortable, and quick and easy to set up and close up again.

    Quite aerodynamic, so the impact on fuel consumption is not too bad,
    Discovery 1 1996 V8i (Sold, owned for 20 years); Freelander 2 2013 SD4 SE; Discovery 4 2014 SDV6 SE; Bushlapa Boskriek


  26. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Harrismith
    Age
    34
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 266

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by hbannink View Post
    Manufacturers do not look at hiking tents for inspiration when it comes to doors, you are right on this one, entry is usually through a much larger aperture and customer demand has driven the combination of gauze closing from the top down and solid panel from the bottom up to the popular layout. When you are on top of your vehicle you are at eye level and prone to invasion of privacy by passers by. Not being on the south seas and in 150km/hr winds but rather in 30+ deg of heat one usually needs some ventilation. The mozzie gauze closing from the top allows you to close it fully keeping the creepy crawlies out and allowing you to close the solid flap from the bottom up allows you to maintain dignity by half closing it and still allowing ventilation on top.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Annotation 2019-09-17 130818.png 
Views:	57 
Size:	272.2 KB 
ID:	541167

    I'm not trying to be argumentative here, I'm just wondering why RTT manufacturers seem so blind to the features of hiking tents that can easily be incorporated into RTTs as well. D-shaped doors with the "hinge" on the left in the above image let you have your cake and eat it too. The opaque door can be opened partially or fully and independently of the mozzie net. You don't have to climb over the door to get in either.

    On the weight front I'm just trying to show that tents don't have to be made out of heavy canvas to be strong and durable.

  27. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to niclemaitre For This Useful Post:


  28. #37
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    856
    Thanked: 761

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Quote Originally Posted by ngweshla View Post
    I have a featherlite rooftop tent , also I modified my own stretcher tent and it can be like sleeping under the stars or with the cover over. its called an Oztrail stretcher queen tent, weight of tent 26kg can support 150kg ether side.
    Very clever, just be carefull with backlight on that tent!
    One of the stupid mistakes in life is to underestimate peoples level of stupidity!

  29. The Following User Says Thank You to Luka For This Useful Post:


  30. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Harrismith
    Age
    34
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 266

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    This seems like a good alternative/compromise https://www.customleisuretech.co.za/...-roof-top-tent

    Maybe a DIY version with a nylon body and the PVC cover...

  31. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Benoni
    Age
    29
    Posts
    21
    Thanked: 16

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    The quick pitch from CLT is still a heavy tent. 45 - 50kg

    Canvas is far more resistant to thorns etc than nylon tents. It is also far less noisy in wind and keeps the light out which is nice if you're relaxing on holiday and would like to sleep in a bit.

    As previously said, extreme hiking tents are about survival in extreme conditions not necessarily providing comfort. Most RTTs are designed for people willing to sacrifice some weight to gain in comfort.

  32. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Half-Pint For This Useful Post:


  33. #40
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    50
    Posts
    856
    Thanked: 761

    Default Re: RTTs and weight

    Just had to share. No idea who or when. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	FB_IMG_15689643735298704.jpg 
Views:	39 
Size:	52.5 KB 
ID:	541571
    One of the stupid mistakes in life is to underestimate peoples level of stupidity!

  34. The Following User Says Thank You to Luka For This Useful Post:


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •