"Old" gas





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  1. #1
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    Default "Old" gas

    There was a discussion quite some time back about the change in composition of LPG gas if bottles are often refilled when not empty, resulting in a reddish flame.

    Was the result a different gas composition? If so, do any of you have more details?


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    Default Re: "Old" gas

    IIRC: if a clean gas is burnt ie a Bunsen burner it burns blue and that if iron (Fe) is added in the mix then it turns red. This could happen as a result of rust in the bottle/tank.
    Last edited by TRON; 2019/07/19 at 11:27 AM.

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  4. #3
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    Default Re: "Old" gas

    Quote Originally Posted by TRON View Post
    IIRC: if a clean gas is burnt ie a Bunsen burner it burns blue and that if iron (Fe) is added in the mix then it turns red. This could happen as a result of rust in the bottle/tank.
    True, but those bottles should not be filled and used anyway - each bottle as an "expiry date". I'm talking of relatively new bottles. The question should probably be if the gas composition can change. I've certainly filled up some bottles in remote areas where the gas burned differently.

    The worst was probably when one of my bottles was overfilled at a local Spar. Luckily I tried using it at home first. It was windy that day, so I took it into the garden and released quite a bit from it - initially quite a bit of liquid also came out.


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    Default Re: "Old" gas

    Quote Originally Posted by TRON View Post
    IIRC: if a clean gas is burnt ie a Bunsen burner it burns blue and that if iron (Fe) is added in the mix then it turns red. This could happen as a result of rust in the bottle/tank.
    How would I know if there is rust in the bottle? I have a bottle that must be 20+ years old (still in very good nick outside) but suspect it might not be the same inside...
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    Default Re: "Old" gas

    Quote Originally Posted by HennieC View Post
    How would I know if there is rust in the bottle? I have a bottle that must be 20+ years old (still in very good nick outside) but suspect it might not be the same inside...
    The cyclinders are stamped with a date of manufacture, normally on the bottom rim. Their lifespan is 10 years, if I remember correctly, and should not be refilled after this. Many filling stations will check this date and refuse to fill bottles older than their lifespan.


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    Default Re: "Old" gas

    An over filled bottle is always a problem especially if used without a regulator and sometimes damages the wick of a gas lantern when the liquid gas enters the lanterns gas wick cavity. It then also burns with a flame inside the lantern glass housing. Incomplete combustion or poor air to fuel ratio also causes discoloration of the flame.

    I am sure that with the importation of gas there could be different mixtures that will give different colours.

    Rust in a bottle is normally picked up by the continual blockage of the valves/nipples. This also occurs if a bottle is left open when stored and it does not have a positive pressure inside the bottle. One can have your bottle checked by some gas suppliers. Gas suppliers are meant to check if the expiry date is exceeded and then should refuse to fill them.

    I had two Cadac cylinders that were replaced after 25yrs of use (naughty and dangerous). The inlet valves were replaced after 20yrs. Not the right thing to exceed safety limits. The problem I had was finding replacement bottles that had the same diameter of the “old” Cadac bottles to fit my bottle carriers.

    I would say that 20yrs is excessive so maybe you should replace them.
    Last edited by TRON; 2019/07/21 at 11:04 AM.

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    Default Re: "Old" gas

    I get my gas from the local farmers co-op. They don't fill bottles and only swap. The bottles are filled by the supplier (Total). I am presently using a brand new 19kg bottle. The gas burns blue but the tips of the flames burn orange on all except the smallest burner on the stove when fully open. When I turn the other burners down to the lowest setting, they all burn blue only.
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