Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa





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  1. #1
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    Default Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Dereck Joubert speaks out.
    See the below just received. This goes far beyond Elephant hunting. This is a complete U-turn by the Botswana government on the entire scope of conservation - until now they've been a leading example to the rest of the world.....

    The minute Ian Khama retires this is what happens, after his lifetime of dedication to conservation in Botswana and his good work..

    10 March 2019

    "PRESS RELEASE: GREAT PLAINS STANCE TO BOTSWANA'S PROPOSED 'BLOOD LAW'

    Our beautiful Botswana is under siege by lobby groups. Yesterday a white paper was submitted to the government recommending wildlife utilisation with a series of suggestions to:


    a) open up the largely condemned hunting of elephants and all wildlife again,
    b) the culling of massive numbers of elephants,
    c) the setting up of canning factories for those dead elephants to convert them into pet food,
    d) more fences, and
    e) the active cutting off of wildlife corridors.
    Read the Botswana Government's White Paper on their official Facebook page here.

    Read the Botswana Government's White Paper on their official Facebook page here.
    https://greatplainsconservation.us2....a&e=534329236f

    At first, I thought it was a cruel April Fools’ Day announcement, but no one is laughing today. I have given this white paper a name and if it passes I believe it should be called 'Botswana’s Blood Law'.


    Internally we are meeting to understand what it means to Great Plains, to our conservation efforts and you our partners, guests and friends. Whilst disturbing, I cannot for a moment believe that any government, let alone Botswana’s, which is world renown for being moderate and well informed, would adopt this policy. We believe that it will be stopped in its tracks but we are soliciting support to help express exactly how shameful it would be to institute a policy such as this.


    I have seen enough dead elephants from the bad guys. I don’t need to see a thousand more piles from our own government. I have seen the damage fences can do. We don’t need more fences we need fewer. I have promoted connective corridors my whole life, with the science being quite clear: according to the very theories of Darwin and Wallace (Biogeography), that the smaller the island the more likely and rapid the rate of extinction. Botswana's proposed 'Blood Law' would be instituting policies to do all of that.


    We will be voicing our opinion against this, as strongly as we can. I will be doing that personally, as the CEO of this company, our foundation, and as large investors in Botswana. Great Plains Conservation will be doing the same.


    As a global community, and a local one, we are better than this and our entire ethos at Great Plains Conservation is based on caring; caring for our communities by sharing revenues and benefits, caring for our guests and partners, and caring for the environment and everything in it. Not one element of this white paper is about caring. It is just the opposite, and so, we are registering, via this announcement, that we are opposed to the very substance of the proposal.


    Our pledge to you, industry partners and guests, is that we will do whatever we can to engage legally and respectfully to make sure this 'Blood Law' is not passed in Botswana.


    Dereck Joubert
    CEO Great Plains Conservation and Great Plains Foundation"
    Toyota Hilux 2.5 D4D SRX https://www.facebook.com/wild.safaris.5/

    The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated - Ghandi

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
    Dereck Joubert speaks out.
    See the below just received. This goes far beyond Elephant hunting. This is a complete U-turn by the Botswana government on the entire scope of conservation - until now they've been a leading example to the rest of the world.....

    The minute Ian Khama retires this is what happens, after his lifetime of dedication to conservation in Botswana and his good work..

    10 March 2019
    Actually, this was released on February 23. There has not been a "complete U-turn... on the entire scope of conservation", merely a re-evaluating of the hunting policy and of policies toward elephant numbers, conservation and management. At the moment, it is a draft recommendation only. Yes, some of the recommendations on culling, pet food, migration routes being closed are just plain daft, but they are recommendations, not proclamations.

    To say that "the minute Ian Khama retires this is what happens" is a tad over the top. He is no boy scout. President Masisi is facing massive pressure on the elephant issue, and he is playing this one very carefully.
    Tony Weaver

    1991 Land Rover 110 Hi-Line S/W 3.5l V8 carburettor
    Cooper Discoverer STT tyres, four sleeper Echo rooftop tent
    2012 Mitsubishi Outlander.

    Previously Land Rover 1968 SII, 1969 SIIA, 1973 SIII, 1983 Toyota HiLux 2litre, 2006 Land Rover Freelander TD4 HSE.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Kgalagadi

    While the media focus has been on elephant culling one of the recommendations has been
    to close the Kgalagadi south western antelope migratory route into South Africa.

    “All wildlife migratory routes that are not beneficial to the country’s conservation efforts be closed,” it suggested.

    Game ranches


    The committee also points out that the Kgalagadi southwesterly antelope migratory route into South Africa should be closed by demarcating game ranches between the communal areas and Kgalagadi Wildlife Management Areas.


    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Weaver View Post
    Actually, this was released on February 23. There has not been a "complete U-turn... on the entire scope of conservation", merely a re-evaluating of the hunting policy and of policies toward elephant numbers, conservation and management. At the moment, it is a draft recommendation only. Yes, some of the recommendations on culling, pet food, migration routes being closed are just plain daft, but they are recommendations, not proclamations.

    To say that "the minute Ian Khama retires this is what happens" is a tad over the top. He is no boy scout. President Masisi is facing massive pressure on the elephant issue, and he is playing this one very carefully.
    ..Tony its just a matter of time ..the writing is on the wall ..'Like we have here ''We will never Nationalise the Reserve Bank'..Ja well no fine

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    ..one hopes this is not symptomatic of a general decline setting in in Botswana .....

    ..would be very sad to see one of the few (only?) African success stories also sinking into the mire of corruption, mismanagement and outright plunder of resources ,hope, and potential.

    https://city-press.news24.com/News/b...khama-20190310

    "The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence."

    - Charles Bukowski

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    It is one thing to enjoy the thrill and excitement of elephants walking thru your campsites and a very different thing to live with the grey giants who destroy your few crops break your water tanks and are a threat to your children on their way to and from school. We can’t continue to only see the problem from our conservation point of view. We must hear the rural population of Botswana and help them, perhaps by allowing them to receive more from the tourism revenue. It is my understanding that three quarters of the entire elephant population is to be found outside of the national parks and game reserves, but will stand corrected.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Spotted in FB : source : The conservation Imperative :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjcH...&feature=share

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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Quote Originally Posted by La Leona View Post
    It is one thing to enjoy the thrill and excitement of elephants walking thru your campsites and a very different thing to live with the grey giants who destroy your few crops break your water tanks and are a threat to your children on their way to and from school. We can’t continue to only see the problem from our conservation point of view. We must hear the rural population of Botswana and help them, perhaps by allowing them to receive more from the tourism revenue. It is my understanding that three quarters of the entire elephant population is to be found outside of the national parks and game reserves, but will stand corrected.

    @ La Leona.....Mmm.....I've seen this movie a thousand times

    The problem is not the elephants

    Rather, its that destructive species known as Homo Sapiens who at the end of the day are to blame, and due especially to human’s uncontrolled breeding, are ever increasingly encroaching on NATURE's boundaries

    Not the other way around

    The sad reality is nature is on the retreat:......decimated.....hounded...polluted.... .poached.....threatened....illegally hunted.......and just plain slaughtered

    In the interim, please dont let facts get in the way of your feelings

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Oats View Post

    Rather, its that destructive species known as Homo Sapiens who at the end of the day are to blame, and due especially to human’s uncontrolled breeding, are ever increasingly encroaching on NATURE's boundaries

    Not the other way around
    Well said! Spot on.
    Toyota Hilux 2.5 D4D SRX https://www.facebook.com/wild.safaris.5/

    The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated - Ghandi

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    Last edited by Paul Dold; 2019/03/19 at 07:48 AM.

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    [QUOTE=Wild Oats;4109237]@ La Leona.....Mmm.....I've seen this movie a thousand times

    The problem is not the elephants

    Rather, its that destructive species known as Homo Sapiens who at the end of the day are to blame, and due especially to human’s uncontrolled breeding, are ever increasingly encroaching on NATURE's boundaries

    Not the other way around

    The sad reality is nature is on the retreat:......decimated.....hounded...polluted.... .poached.....threatened....illegally hunted.......and just plain slaughtered

    In the interim, please dont let facts get in the way of your feelings
    [/QUOTE

    Let me state up front that I am a dedicated conservationist, I love elephants and deplore the killing of any species without control. However it is a sad fact that the greatest source of extinctinction of any species is habitat destruction for whatever reason. Elephants, unfortunately, are
    hugely habitat destructive and the fact that they have destroyed all palatable vegetation within an increasingly vast distance from the Chobe river, as an example, leaving them a daily trek of some 20-40 km to water from their feeding grounds is unsustainable.

    Conservation requires management and sentiment has no place. If the elephant population is allowed to increase at its present rate, it will not take too long before elephants join the dodo, and will only be seen in pictures. This should also be a lesson to the human population of Africa.

    Scientifically there is a carrying capacity of the vegetation in any area which should not be exceeded without causing permanent damage and it makes no difference what species is involved. That is what conservation is all about - sustainability. To remain a healthy and viable population no species can be allowed to breed uncontrolled. Nature, as far as most species is concerned, takes care of the situation. The carnivores at the top of the food chain feed on the old, sick and weak members of the herds of their prey, which keeps the populations in check, but elephants and rhinos are the exception, except when it comes to the poaching problem.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Botswana's "Blood law" a U-turn on conservation, a death knell for Africa

    I've been doing Bots for 37 years, often for long stretches in the bush and upon each return I see larger areas decimated by elephants. As much as I love those creatures (300,000 photos and counting and never touched a gun of any type), I sometimes wonder if a few less might not be for the good of all and if a few villages can get in some much needed $$$$ then perhaps it's a win-win. Just a thought.

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