Power Hammer





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Thread: Power Hammer

  1. #1
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    Default Power Hammer

    Recently built a power hammer for forging damascus steel.

    It's a bit of a cross between a proper "shop bought" machine and a "junk yard hammer", in that it was designed and made with thought given to being able to maintain it for many years, while using some second-hand parts and keeping costs as reasonable as possible.

    It also has several adjustments built-in, from crank-pin radius (which affects striking force), anvil gap, to pedal force and stroke. It also has replaceable anvils so that special anvils can be fitted to do special operations such as shaping fullers and so forth.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    1996 Patrol 4.2SGL with lots of stuff to make it heavier and thus increase traction?

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    The heart of these types of machines is the toggle-link connecting arm linkage.

    Basically as the crank pin is moving downward, it compresses the springs in the toggle. This energy is transferred back into the hammer as it approaches the bottom of the stroke.

    It also ensures that the striking force is less affected by the thickness of the metal being forged. In these pics, it can be seen working.
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    1996 Patrol 4.2SGL with lots of stuff to make it heavier and thus increase traction?

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  5. #3
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    Very well done, what size motor did you use?

  6. #4
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    Thanks Dave.

    Motor is 1.1kw, hammer weighs about 35kg and striking fr3quency is about 1.5-1.8 strikes/second.
    1996 Patrol 4.2SGL with lots of stuff to make it heavier and thus increase traction?

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  8. #5
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    That is impressive.

  9. #6
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    Thanks Bex
    1996 Patrol 4.2SGL with lots of stuff to make it heavier and thus increase traction?

  10. #7
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Connan View Post
    Thanks Bex
    I cant understand mechanically how it works. Where is the motor.

  11. #8
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I cant understand mechanically how it works. Where is the motor.
    Next to the wheel/tyre. Shaft turn against the tyre's friction surface. Look at the drawings.
    2004 Defender 110 Td5


  12. #9
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    Default Re: Power Hammer

    Motor is mounted on a see-saw under/next to the wheel. The other end of the see-saw is a brake pad.

    The see-saw is connected to the foot pedal. The weight of the motor and drive wheel (a solid steel bar of 70mm diameter, 200mm long) presses the brake pedal against the tire and stops the machine when you lift your foot off the pedal.

    If you step on the pedal, the motor's drive wheel pushes against the tire to drive the machine.

    In this way you are able to control the machine (including the speed of the hammer) without having to use your hands.
    1996 Patrol 4.2SGL with lots of stuff to make it heavier and thus increase traction?

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