Volvo XC60: Review





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  1. #1
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    Default Volvo XC60: Review

    In the past, threads inquiring re the suitability of a Volvo XC60 as softroader, have sporadically popped up and then died on page one, due to lack of response. Primarily - I assume - as no one had taken that leap of faith to actually buy one and see.

    3 weeks ago I did just that - bought a used model for exactly this purpose. So I thought it possibly useful to those other "voices in the desert" to jot down what I have learnt to date on both tar and trail (gravel & sand, still rocks to do).

    From the experience to date (17000km) - including the modifications below - I am pleased that this car works for me.

    Some modifications are in process/has been/will be implemented in due course, and this - as well as accessories added - will be reported on in a separate thread, as they occur. See here: https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...quot-sand-quot

    So here goes: (all updates will be added in red)

    Volvo XC60: First-order review
    Preamble
    So, finally, after 8 years and almost 200,000km of fantastic tours and destinations – Zim, Moz, Mal, Nam, Swaziland, Lesotho - it became time to retire “old faithful” and replace the Freelander 2 with something newer, hopefully still with a warranty and service plan.

    The no-brainer would be another LR2, but that would not meet the vintage requirement above. Well, then, the replacement could be the Discovery Sport.

    After considerable investigation, and an evaluation at Land Rover Experience, my initial enthusiasm was however somewhat tempered.

    First off - as before - I wanted a petrol engine with a timing chain, as I intend to keep the replacement for a considerable period of time after the warranty expired and do not want to worry about trivial things like belt replacements.

    However, the latest Ford Ingenium petrol engines only became available in this vehicle in 2018, and I was not buying new. From chatting to owners of Land Rovers with the older Si4 engine – which was also fitted to the early Evoques – the feedback on fuel consumption was very negative. It sounded like it was not much better than my current i6.

    Also, the outing at LR Experience was somewhat sobering, as the sample we had on the day was a lot worse than the LR2 in situations where a wheel lifted or a rocky slope attempted. The ground clearance appeared lower than both the LR2 and Evoque, possibly due to the wheelbase being stretched, impacting the breakover angle negatively. It really sukkeled.

    So – philosophically - I tried to summarize what I was trying to replace. The conclusion was:

    A Ford Freelander with Volvo parts. If only there was a newer Ford Volvo with Freelander parts….

    It turned out there was.



    Volvo XC60: same-same? Yes. And no.

    Styling
    In terms of styling, what made the choice difficult, was that the present take on SUV design, was not really to my liking. That Freelander 2 boxy design grows on you and you start associating it with a fit-for-purpose layout.

    Nowadays, either the car looks like the designer lost his French Curve, implementing direction changes on the bodywork by straight-line approximations using a 15cm ruler, making it appear restless. Or it looks like a tiger – or some other cat – or a shark, or a guppie, or something which would appeal to the pimping crowd.

    I was looking for clean, purposeful lines.


    Size
    The Volvo roofline is lower, but it is larger in every other dimension relative to the Freelander 2. A fortunate coincidence of the shape, is that it is not recognizable as a 4x4 at the car wash, avoiding the premium usually applicable to such vehicles. Yes, I saved R10 yesterday :-).

    The wheelbase is longer by 100mm, and although it appears that the front overhang is a lot more than that of the LR2, it is the same. It just does not curve up from just ahead of the front wheels, which impacts the approach angle negatively.

    Fortunately, they have retained the short turning circle of the parent vehicle. Actually, no. It is a bit wider, similar to the Tiguan, perhaps not quite as bad. You however sit “in” the car and not “on” it. So the hood is not visible. Neither can you lean out the car window to see what is on the ground right next to the car, as the window line on the doors are too high, sloping upwards towards the rear. You now have to plan carefully when exiting a parkade, because unless your distance is exactly right, you cannot get the ticket into the reader due to the high window line.

    There is a lot more legroom at the rear.

    The driver’s left foot rest space is quite cramped due to the brake pedal being in close proximity to the footrest. I cannot quite get my foot in there with Salomons (Size 12.5) on, but standard shoes or slops are ok.


    Underbody Protection
    Ground clearance is another deceptive parameter on the XC60. It is more than the Freelander. No, really. 230mm in front, 245mm at the back. This is the same as the Freelander with a 20mm lift.

    The fuel tanks – also 70l, thankfully - do not hang out below the floor of the vehicle, but is tucked in – which is why there is only room for a 125/80 R17 space saver spare in the boot - update: not true, tank below rear seat squab. Spare space sacrificed to make room for rear muffler. The two tank halves even has plastic covers to keep the dirt off. This will be replaced with a metal version in due course. Following a number of offroad excursions, this will stay exactly as it is - no additional protection needed.

    The complete drive-train – Haldex 5 and differential – as well as the exhaust are also all tucked in. On the Freelander 2 the lowest part at the rear was the exhaust, where it had a kink just ahead of the rear axle. None of that here.

    Unfortunately, the sump guard is made of cardboard. OK, not really, but the same composite material that rear parcel shelves are made of on cheaper hatchbacks. Also, there is a large uncovered gap between the radiator and engine. What were they thinking?

    Anyway, the freshly designed – full coverage - Al sump guard is presently being water-jetted and folded, so all will be good for the annual trek down to the coast. Made it down - with plate fitted. Longest stretch 14 hours of continuous driving - Pretoria to Matjiesfontein - stopping 3 times, in total less than 1 hour for refueling, dewatering and refreshment, plus the hour of stop/start rolling up to the Vaal toll plaza in the 5km queue. Ambient temp around 35°C from around midday, cooling down to just above 30 on arrival. No funnies ito temperature, fan did not come on when stopping. So the plate does not unduly affect cooling - refer other thread for initial concerns.


    Wheel size
    18, 20 and 21” are the options on these cars. The i6 has 18” wheels, and honestly this is absolutely the worst wheel size in terms of commonality, options and cost of tyres.

    You see an advert for a tyre you want in 17” size. R2500. You enquire about the 18” equivalent. R3500. For less rubber?

    This riled me to the point of emailing Pirelli SA, confronting them with the theory that their tyre price structure is adapted to the perceived pocket depth of their customers. Aha, 18” wheels? So you bought the fancy model. Must have money for tyres, then.

    They did not respond.

    17” would be optimal, as this is now mostly universal on bakkies and SUVs, say a Prado. But then 19” is also very common on larger SUVs, and standard on e.g. a LR Discovery.
    So I opted for 19”. The reasoning went like this:

    Say I shred a tyre in Botswana. I fit the spare – I have to carry that with me, as the standard space saver is no good – but then loose another.

    Based on forum reports, when you come across an abandoned Prado, it is invariably burnt out. So even with 17” tyres, you would not be able to salvage one of those tyres for personal use.

    However, Discoveries don’t burn. No, they snap cranks. So if you come across an abandoned Discovery, you would be spoilt for choice as to which of the 5 tyres you wanted. Win-win.

    The only snag was that the Volvo tyre size is 235/55 R19 and the Discovery 255/55 R19. So the XC60 tyres would require an upgrade to that size. Which I did. They fit beautifully, and roll and steer with no interference.

    Like so:

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    Ride
    Ummm….

    Let me just define the reference: “The car with the best ride ever built in the history of mankind, was the Freelander 2”. The decision of the "judge" is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

    So, on a scale of 1 to 10, where does the XC60 peg?

    On undulating terrain - e.g. speed bumps, road depressions – the ride is similar, scoring 8 or 9.

    On road irregularities, like expansion joints, tar level changes, disintegrating surfaces, potholes – not so much. Probably 5 or 6.

    This is primarily due to the very much stiffer suspension, shorter travel, and the fact that the rear suspension is no longer a McPherson layout, but damper at the wheel, and spring inboard on the transverse link. Like a Tiguan or Pajero – and many other vehicles.

    The advantage is that the boot is noticeably larger as the intrusions due to the strut springs are no longer there. On the LR2 there is exactly 1m width between these covers, where on the XC60 this increases to 1.13m.

    However, in mitigation, the tyres the car came with, were Continental V-rated tyres. The tyre construction change required when upspeccing from an H (210km/h) to a V (240 km/h) rating, causes the latter to have a very much stiffer sidewall. This is due to the Nylon tread cap rolling into the sidewalls part of the way in order to rigidize them, thus limiting the heat build-up. When these tyres are inflated to 2.2 bar, there is almost no flat spot visible at the ground contact point. Neither does the tyre bulge.

    As mentioned above, the tyres were then changed - to Pirelli 255/55 R19. This is an H-rated tyre, with an additional 10mm of sidewall height. The improvement in ride was immediately noticeable, so I would now rate it a 7. Also, the flat spot and bulge is now how it should be. Plus another 10mm of ground clearance: 240/255mm.

    Still, no Freelander 2.

    I am changing my opinion - the stiffer suspension is more suited to offroad work than the LR2. After a 5000km plus holiday, having done 4 trails, driving the atrocious roads between Springbok and Kleinzee and then onwards to Port Nolloth, the car did not touch the ground once. The suspension did bottom out a few times on the gravel roads, but it has decent bump stops, so this just reminds you to slow down slightly.

    I did some research on aftermarket dampers, and intend replacing the rear OEM Sachs struts with KONI FSD technology. Very clever way of having two valve rates in a single tube, dependent on the frequency of the disturbance. Short sharp inputs like road irregularities damp softer, where slow changes - like the suspension loading when rounding a corner - damp stiffer. The struts have arrived - refer Post #18.


    Features
    Everything the HSE has, plus:


    Electrically operated boot

    Integrated low-profile roof rails. Really neat, almost invisible. Sadly, the Thule Wingbar Edge 9595 low-profile – claimed to be noiseless – aero bars sells for R6000 per set. Anyone has a set they’re willing to part with, I’ll give you half that. I imported a set of Whispbar Flush Bars at 75% the price of Thule. Refer last post in modification thread.

    All models have the sunroof. However, other than the LR, which gave you sunburn on your head THROUGH the perforated retracting cover, with this version the glass has been tinted sufficiently dark to be comfortable even with the solid retractable blind open.

    The interior is black throughout. A bit much, I think, especially above the window sill.

    The LR2 had a phone button which did not work. This car pairs with your phone, you play the music wifi, press a button when the phone rings, and have a normal conversation without touching the phone. It has a hard disk onto which you can download your entire directory/music library, or scroll through the numbers from one of the stalks, etc. It will play single CDs, also.

    The standard sound system is excellent, with a 5-band equalizer, but no sub. Good mid-bass – almost sounds like a sub with certain material. Planning to build my own sub.

    All keyfob functionality – like folding mirrors, unlocking doors, etc – is programmed from within the car via an extensive menu system. No need to visit a dealer.

    The NAV system has maps which covers Africa and the Middle East, compared to the LR2, which did not go outside SA borders, not even Swaziland or Lesotho. Free updates until the warranty expires. So in my case, good for the next 4 years.

    Also, traffic congestion is indicated on the route in red, similar to Google Maps. I have not been able to determine how the SENSUS system knows this, but assume via Bluetooth from your paired cellphone.

    The rear seats – more practically - split in 3 sections instead of two, COMPLETELY flat. The squabs do not have to be tumbled up to do so.

    The rear seat headrests has a release catch which allows it to flip forward horizontally, providing an unobstructed view out the rear window.

    This model has a reversing camera, which other than the guide lines predicting where the car is going, also has a tow hitch guide, replacing the above guidelines with the tow ball trajectory. I do not tow, but thought this could be useful to people who does.

    The front passenger seat has exactly - well, almost, seat is not programmable as is the driver's - the same functionality than the driver, even lumbar support. On the HSE, this seat was a more basic version of the driver’s. Independent front edge adjustment of the squab is also provided, so you can lift the seat to support your legs just above your knees. I’m still bedding the seat in, though.

    Has user-selectable Stop/Start. Active every time engine is started, can be disabled via central console button. It is an intelligent system. If the ambient temperature exceeds 28°C, it does not switch off. If you were to start turning the steering wheel after it has turned off, it will restart, and remain on. If you briefly lift your foot off the brake pedal and depress it again, the engine will restart and remain running. If the A/C was off when stopping, the engine will restart when it is turned on.

    As for the HSE LR2, excellent Bi-Xenon lights. But also fitted with Active Bending Lights (ABL), which links the beam to the steering, lighting up the side of the road towards which you are turning. Works well and very useful.

    And then - could not confirm whether this option was fitted, previously - it does have that autonomous braking feature. City Safety, is the Volvo buzzword. I learnt this when rolling up towards a security boom which was still opening, with the car slamming on the brakes when the nose passed underneath it, coming to a dead stop. Takes you by surprise. Similar to someone driving into the back of you, just with no damage :-).

    The cubby-hole is lockable via an easily releasable - not the nail-breaking mechanism of the LR2 keyfob - skeleton key. This may seem like an innocuous feature, but if you have not had that previously, the fact that you do not have to evacuate your car of everything stealable prior to a car wash or service, is a liberating experience. And the cubby is HUGE.


    Off-road
    Refer https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...quot-sand-quot. As mentioned, good ground clearance, but front overhang may need attention. Spacers should help. Rear is good.

    Has user-selectable Hill Descent Control - via buttons on the centre console - and can limit the Stability Control via the menu system. The drive system works the same as the LR2: Pulls off in AWD, then at 40km/h switches to mostly front wheel drive. No other off-road modes. The claim is that the Haldex 5 reaction is SO fast – compared to the Haldex 3 – that drive transfer occurs almost seamlessly.

    Off-road YouTube video clips seem to bear out this claim. Generally, however, these tests are executed by car salesmen, talking too much and driving like Muppets. I sometimes cringe when I see the line taken. So I am expecting even better. But we’ll see.

    The owner’s manual recommends starting off on slippery surfaces in manual mode, 3rd gear. I have tried this on a hard, flat surface, and was surprised that it could actually move off at all.

    3rd gear on the Volvo is close to 2nd on the LR2. It is unknown whether this process changes other drive parameters as well, e.g. accelerator and steering response.

    The car comes with a tyre monitoring system. Not a pressure system in the valves, but counting wheel rotation and comparing it to the other wheels. This works on the principle that as tyre pressure reduces, the diameter between the wheel centre and road also decreases, thereby increasing the number of rotations over distance compared to the good tyres. The system then lights up an indicator next to the "fast" wheel. After upgrading the tyres from 235 to 255, on the way home it reported all 4 tyres faulty - this was within 2 to 3km - for a circumference increase of 3%. Progressively deflating one of the new tyres to see what both the trigger and reporting delay tolerances are, is still to be done.


    Engine
    As mentioned, petrol. T5 2l, 4cylinder turbocharged, 180kW, 350Nm from 1500 to 4000rpm. These same engines – and Aisin transmissions - have been in use since 2014 and carried over to the latest XC40/60/90. So good history and current design.

    The next model up - T6 - adds a supercharger, good for 225kW and 400Nm.

    It is effortless, and with the 8-speed auto – a newer version of the Freelander 2 transmission - always in the right gear, with much better spacing than the LR2.

    It drives like my 2008 Tiguan TDi did, in terms of response. Rarely goes above 2500rpm, puttering around at between 1800 and 2000 rpm. It does make a bit of a prrrr sound, quite close to a diesel, actually – just a lot quieter. Ja swaer, not the same character as an inline 6, I’m afraid ….

    On the first two tanks, fuel consumption was 3l/100km less than the i6. Just above 9l/100km. For an almost 2-ton vehicle.

    I will verify over the December 4000km plus holiday trip whether the larger tyres make a significant difference to the consumption. The rolling resistance will be 8.5% higher, going from a 235 to 255 width.


    What’s missing?
    Rubber mats
    Mudflaps (R2000 option)
    Full size spare
    Engine noise


    Cost
    As confirmation of the rumour that Volvos don’t hold value, I paid just over R200k UNDER retail value – from a dealer’s demo stock.

    Assuming an average inflation rate of 6% over the period, the Volvo was actually in real terms cheaper than the out-of-warranty Freelander 2, back in 2010. This for a spotless 2017 Inscription model, 18000km, with still 4 years of both warranty and service plan left.

    Oh yes, it also included an OEM tow bar - which I had to fit as an accessory to the previous car - and would have cost R12k on the Volvo if not standard. The gooseneck is removable, but only with great effort. The quick-release towbar option installs for R16k.

    Santam started off with an insurance premium quote of over R1700/m. I got a quote from Tuffstuff (thanks, Raymond!) for R500 less, including special insurance on tyres, plus some other stuff. Almost sounds better than Outsurance?

    Also, I did not have to fit a tracking device - at an excess penalty which I am willing to risk. After all, who steals a Volvo? On this topic, the car is sold with a factory-fitted immobilizing and tracking device installed. You can then choose to activate it or not. I opted out.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/06/11 at 08:16 AM.
    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    I did 175000km in my XC60 D5 without so much as changing a light bulb. Very, very enjoyable car. And yes, the Haldex really does react quickly. Enjoy every moment. I went to a new Tiguan and I certainly do miss certain aspects of the Volvo.
    We can't change the wind but we can set our sails

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  5. #3
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    I started to fancy a XC 60 as a replacement for Sambo's Pajero in maybe three years time. I have a double cab for bundu bashing and children will be out of school by then so we will not need something as big as the Pajero. I only expect the XC60 to handle gravel. Nothing more.

    I want to buy one of the last of the pervious shape. (2017/early 2018 model-preferably Diesel.)

    The only thing that put a doubt in my mind is: How easy would it sell after being 10 years old with 200 000kms on the clock?

    What I found interesting is that the second hand awd models go for the about same money as the fwd models. I wonder why?

    The bottom line for me is: To Volvo or not to Volvo?

    Any inputs will be appreciated!

    Bostoe
    Last edited by bostoe; 2018/11/23 at 04:17 PM.

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Quote Originally Posted by bostoe View Post
    I started to fancy a XC 60 as a replacement for Sambo's Pajero in maybe three years time. I have a double cab for bundu bashing and children will be out of school by then and we do not need something as big as the Pajero. I only expect the XC60 to handle gravel. Nothing more.

    I want to buy one of the last of the pervious shape. (2017/early 2018 model-preferably Diesel.)

    The only thing that put a doubt in my mind is: How easy would it sell after being 10 years old with 200 000kms on the clock?

    What I found interesting is that the second hand awd models go for the about same money as the fwd models. I wonder why?

    The bottom line for me is: To Volvo or not to Volvo?

    Any inputs will be appreciated!

    Bostoe
    To Volvo!

    We've been wanting an XC60 for yonks, but decent ones just keeps out of our budget.

    Why on earth would you worry about resale value on a 10 year old car? The Diesels (especially the 5cyl) have a reputation of going to 300k km+ without blinking an eye.

    Do it.
    Current: 2013 Honda Insight Hybrid CVT
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    SWAMBO: 2011 Volvo XC60 D5 AWD Geartronic

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Kix View Post
    To Volvo!

    We've been wanting an XC60 for yonks, but decent ones just keeps out of our budget.

    Why on earth would you worry about resale value on a 10 year old car? The Diesels (especially the 5cyl) have a reputation of going to 300k km+ without blinking an eye.

    Do it.
    That is encouraging!!!

    Thanks

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Quote Originally Posted by bostoe View Post
    I want to buy one of the last of the previous shape. (2017/early 2018 model-preferably Diesel.)

    The only thing that put a doubt in my mind is: How easy would it sell after being 10 years old with 200 000kms on the clock?

    What I found interesting is that the second hand awd models go for the about same money as the fwd models. I wonder why?

    The bottom line for me is: To Volvo or not to Volvo?

    Any inputs will be appreciated!

    Hi Bostoe,

    In terms of the Volvo I am still a newbie, but my procurement concept was the same as yours. What I did, was list ALL the XC60s available on Autotrader and track them daily. I saw the following pattern:

    • There are no 2015 or 2016 models available, leading me to think that the 2017 models advertised were all dealer demos, which became "redundant" when the new model was launched 4 months ago. They are still hanging on to the "old" 2018 models, though.
    • When prices are adjusted downwards, this happens on a Monday. Sometimes R10k, sometimes up to R40k. So if you only want to check once a week, this is when it has to be.


    I tracked the prices for just over 12 weeks, before my number came up. See attachment of how I did it. It is in MSWord, so you can edit it for your purposes. Many of those cars will still be available.

    Your biggest issue is going to be to decide on the wheel size, but one of the dealers I spoke to said they will swop the wheels off another Volvo on the floor if the one I wanted had the wrong wheels.

    A Volvo towbar will cost you another R12k. I wanted the Harmon Kardan sound, but had to settle for the standard, which is still very good. Bear in mind that even with the HK sound, the subwoofer is an OPTION. So it does not necessarily have any better bass than the standard system. It does have 12 speakers instead of 8 and will play louder.

    Then, the on-the-road cost varies from R5k to R12k between dealers. No, really.

    Also attached, a summary of the service schedule. This only lists the petrol models, but I have the complete list should you be interested. I googled this - before I had the car and therefore a manual - due to rumours labeling Volvo services expensive. From the list I cannot see why this should be so, unless the labour is more expensive than anyone else. Very rarely is anything replaced - see highlighted replacement items - and often only on mileage, NOT on period. You have to manage this when you take your car in, instructing the workshop not to replace such items.

    Post warranty, I also do not expect to arrive at a service centre with a pamphlet dished out on a street corner offering a full service for R795 - Feb 2019 update. If original parts and specified lubricants are used, R4000 plus for a service is reasonable. But only in 4 years time .

    If you only consider engine oil, Volvo specifies 5W30 Castrol Edge Professional - the same as that for the LR2 - which costs between R120 - R140/l, depending on where you go. This times 5.4l totals up to R756, so the mind boggles as to what the offer above would put in.

    I agree with Kix that retention of resale value over that period of time should not even be considered. I regularly see 12 year old Volvos still running. Jy ry hom tot hy klaar is!
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/02/13 at 12:24 PM. Reason: Add relevant oil change interval
    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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  11. #7
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Congrats on the new car...hope you have many new adventures in it.

    Looking forward to seeing your upgrades for the Volvo.

    The Freelander 2 is a really difficult vehicle to replace.

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Thank you for a really comprehensive and unbiased review. Sounds like a great car you have there.

    Regarding your comment about tyres I can only agree with you. Our Mitsubishi Outlander has 225/55 x 18 tyres and we needed two of these in Springbok. The first 2 tyres dealers said good luck in finding these in the Northern Cape. Luckily the 3rd dealer had them because they had specially ordered them and the person had not collected them otherwise they too would not have had them.
    Kevin
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    2014 Mitsubishi Outlander (wife's car).
    1969 Series IIa 109 station wagon (Chev 3800 engine) Sold

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    Default Volvo XC60: Review

    Regarding services I think Volvo is pretty reasonable, swambo had a xc60 D5 till after maintenance plan and the average service was around 3k, timing belt service was more expensive at 15k.

    I am on my 3rd Volvo and they have all been very reliable with the only fix I had to do, the rear diff on the xc60, old model 2010 iirc.

    At the moment I am trading in Swambo’s fortuner and buying my dads 2015 Xc60 D5 for what they offered him for trade in.

    Unfortunately Volvo’s don’t keep value like a Toyota but buying second hand gives you a lot of bang for your buck.
    Last edited by Jeanvn; 2018/12/02 at 10:23 AM.
    Tjiep Softroadertjie
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Wading Depth

    On brochures/road tests, usually wading depth is grouped together with ground clearance and approach/departure angles.

    For the Freelander 2 it was 500mm, Discovery 600mm and I seem to recall for the latest Ranger bakkies, 800mm.

    Volvo does not mention this, and most owners would never know what it is - unless they read to page 303 of the 433 page owner's manual.

    Fortunately, if you download a soft copy of the document, you can search.

    Rarely is it stated which parameter was used to determine this depth, but most folks probably assume that is the depth where you drown the engine.

    However, once you get to page 303, you will find Volvo is quite specific about this – also utilizing CMA - and states the following:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    At first review, 350mm sounded disappointing - through the centre of the wheels - so I decided to investigate where the XC60 air intake then is, seeing as they did not mention specifics of water ingestion.

    I was relieved to find that the lowest edge of the air intake – although behind the grill – was tucked away and facing sideways, not forward.

    Furthermore, the water would have to rise – on a standard XC60 – to 730mm before it found its way into the duct. This is just above the second lowest slat of the grill.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The air intake is the vertical opening just to the left of the dead bug.

    The airbox is quite deep and has two rubber drainage flaps which would open should any water be taken in. This point is somewhat lower than the air intake, but as long as the water level is below 650mm, drainage would take place.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    So, it was good to learn that the occasional gulp of water splashed into the air intake would not cause the car to cough, as it would be directed down the “right pipe”.

    In an emergency therefore, one could ignore the 350mm limit, as even though water MAY cause damage to the transmission or differential, this would be long term and should allow one to at least get home where corrective maintenance could be performed.

    Even if my vehicle did have a no-damage 800mm wading capability, I would not attempt it, because depending on how well enclosed the underside is, it may well float off the road surface and bob down the river.

    But here is some - true story - professional advice re water crossings. I have posted this previously a long time ago, so pse ignore it if you have read it at that time.

    So my friend Riaan buys a brand new Freelander 2 in 2007, and gets a voucher for a Land Rover Experience training day. He goes, and they get a lecture as to how the drive train works, the various terrain response modes and practical instruction on crossing obstacles. Then the topic of water crossing comes up.

    The instructor tells them that if you come across water on an offroad outing, the first thing you do is walk the obstacle. If the water is deeper than your ankles, park the car in the shade and make sure the family is comfortable.

    Start walking upstream. If, after 5km, you have not come across a bridge, return to the car. Make sure the loved ones are still happy and possibly move the car to a better shade spot due to the sun’s position having changed since you left.

    Start walking downstream. If, after 5km, you have not come across a bridge, return to the car. Hopefully, it is now late enough so you can go home.

    Sage advice, I say.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2018/12/03 at 09:55 PM.
    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

  16. #11
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Storage Space

    Through my ownership of the LR2, there were a few forum discussions regarding the lack of packing space in that car. I defended this, stating that there is a lot more space below the boot floor, if you remove the spare wheel and transport it on the hitch or in the trailer, should you have one.

    This is the way all my holiday packing went, which worked fine, but I only realized how little space there really was once I compared it to the Volvo.

    So for comparison purposes, I used the boot mat and car mattress of the LR2 to illustrate the differences.

    First off, the boot itself:

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    Then with the folded mattress stored:

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    Finally with the mattress deployed:

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    The above demonstrates how much space is lost in the LR2 due to the rear seat squabs having to be tumbled to get the load area flat. On the Volvo they remain in place. There is a full 2m from behind the front seats up to rear hatch window level.

    The space below the Volvo boot floor is very limited. The 125/80 R17 space saver spare just fits, sloping upwards towards the centre. This is because the metalwork is dished very shallow towards the centre of the boot to create a cavity for the rear muffler to be lifted as far away from the ground as possible. This effort was very successful.

    Even with the spare removed, not much would go there. Not even a single 10l Jerry can. Recovery gear, e.g. snatch strap and compressor would fit, but then again, you do not really want it there.

    Like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    If this cover is removed, there is obviously more space, but then not compartmentalized.

    But perhaps a good place for the axe, grid and loose pieces of braai wood scattered across the irregular shape. You’ll get at least one bag’s worth in there.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2018/12/08 at 11:40 AM.
    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Double Post
    Last edited by JJJ; 2018/12/08 at 12:06 PM. Reason: Double Post
    Johnie
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    The little things

    So a big thing was made of the new XC40 flip-up boot floor, which then forms a triangular division between the wheels so you can put your shopping bags between this and the back of the rear seat to prevent it from rolling all over the place and bottles becoming projectiles. It also has hooks facing the rear where you can hang additional bags.

    I thought this was really neat and a modern innovation. Almost worth just buying the car for that
    .

    Turns out, the old XC60 already had this in. This was just a refined version of "more of the same".

    Still a good idea, though. Nice touch, the reflective strip, for after hours shopping loading. Even though, as soon as you open the boot, the rear lights come on anyway. So it's not as if someone approaching from behind won't see you standing behind the car. But, just to be sure.....

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This also contributes to less space for the spare wheel, although it could actually be as a result thereof. The reasoning probably went: Shucks, not quite enough space for a full size spare. May as well utilize the surplus for something else, convenient. What could it be.....
    Last edited by JJJ; 2018/12/08 at 12:51 PM.
    Johnie
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    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Kix View Post
    To Volvo!

    We've been wanting an XC60 for yonks, but decent ones just keeps out of our budget.

    Why on earth would you worry about resale value on a 10 year old car? The Diesels (especially the 5cyl) have a reputation of going to 300k km+ without blinking an eye.

    Do it.
    Well, Christmas came early in the form of Petri Oosthuizen from this here forum delivering something Swedish this evening.

    Full thread to follow when I can take proper pictures.
    Current: 2013 Honda Insight Hybrid CVT
    Ex:
    2005 Volvo XC70 2.5T Geartronic

    SWAMBO: 2011 Volvo XC60 D5 AWD Geartronic

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  21. #15
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    We are also doing our first trip in the ‘new’ xc60, it is a 2015 D5 polestar.

    Will add some comments when we return home next week.
    Tjiep Softroadertjie
    Volvo XC60

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanvn View Post
    We are also doing our first trip in the ‘new’ xc60, it is a 2015 D5 polestar.

    Will add some comments when we return home next week.
    Excellent.

    I test drove a D5 Polestar before we bought ours. I have to say, I cannot really feel any difference.

    Did you drive non-Polestar examples before you bought yours?

    Our car here: https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...O-s-new-wheels
    Last edited by Kix; 2018/12/15 at 11:25 AM.
    Current: 2013 Honda Insight Hybrid CVT
    Ex:
    2005 Volvo XC70 2.5T Geartronic

    SWAMBO: 2011 Volvo XC60 D5 AWD Geartronic

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    I can only compare it to my previous 2010 D5, this one definitely has a little something extra.

    If you put it in sport mode the fat girl pics up her skirt and runs a little

    Think it is 170kw and 470nms so not much more power but less lag.

    Fuel economy not too bad, got 12.3km/l with highway and a bit of cape town inner city driving.

    Would love to hear yours without the polestar?

    I recon the last of the old shape with the 8speed auto will do much better.
    Tjiep Softroadertjie
    Volvo XC60

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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    KONI Shocks
    6 weeks to the day, the KONI shocks referred to in the original post have arrived. Part number 82451308, at R2250 each, imported directly from the Dutch manufacturer by D&S Shocks, Boksburg.

    Here is what it looks like:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I will install them latest over the weekend and report on the procedure in the mod post.

    A review on the ride – these dampers were selected in the hope that it will soften the ride at the rear over SA roads - will subsequently be posted in this thread.

    In the meantime, here is some reading material from KONI with more detail on how FSD shocks differ from the OEM models: http://www.koni.com/en-US/Cars/Techn...VE_Technology/
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/03/17 at 05:57 PM.
    Johnie
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  26. #19
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    So after a month of driving with the new Koni dampers, I can honestly say that I can not feel any difference between these and the OEM Sachs units.

    At least it is not worse. So now I have a spare set which I will swop once these ones are shot.

    The biggest improvement in ride comfort was definitely the tyre change.

    To adapt the ride at the rear then seems requiring a spring change.

    I'm however pretty used to the dynamics of the car now and am not going to bother any further.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/04/15 at 11:28 AM.
    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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  28. #20
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    What a jolly nuisance!

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    Although the car remains dry internally, when you drive through water, this part of the vehicle gets absolutely filthy. Add to this sliding around in mud, and it becomes a right mess. Shown is my "tidy" SIDE.

    The other side where SWAMBO got in and out to open the farm gates, was a lot worse.

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    What I do not understand, is that the door design on the Freelander 2 extends over the sill to almost underneath the car, preventing this.

    Now Ford designs the XC60 in 2009 - the Freelander 3, essentially - and they do away with this feature.

    One should therefore give Geely credit for listening to the Swedes and bringing this Ford feature back - at least on the XC40, where it was extensively advertised as a "new" feature .
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/05/06 at 07:10 AM.
    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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