Volvo XC60: Review - Page 2





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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    We love Volvo even though we traded our XC70 for an Amarok after 240K.

    Many times we just smiled at people when we were in Mozambique, Baviaanskloof etc. It was one of the most enjoyable, multi functional vehicles I ever owned.

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    Although Swambo does not have an XC60, she loves her V40XC

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Review - of the dealership
    Call me paranoid if you like, but a car service is always a dreaded event for me, as my cars go in for a service in 100% condition except for the wear items, but I do not know what I am getting back.

    I am happy to report that CMH Volvo Silver Lakes exceeded my expectations. It was somewhat of a surprise to learn that even wear items are free under warranty, e.g. wiper blades and brake pads. Long time no new car, comes to mind. I will have to get used to this over the next 3 years.

    The car was also exceptionally well cleaned, both inside and out. As I bought it, basically.

    I also learnt that the transmission oil is changed every 60k km, which is good news, as I am of the opinion that the "filled for life" policy on the Freelander 2, is what caused the demise of that transmission.

    Even though I did not pay anything, both labour and parts cost are listed on the invoice, and is quite reasonable - cheaper than the Freelander 2 was.

    So all in all, a pleasant experience.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/08/03 at 08:36 AM.
    If my post insulted you, wonder where the smiley went .

    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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  4. #23
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Accessory: Boot Mat Review
    Having had a very useful rubber mat in the Freelander 2 boot, a similar product was sourced for the Volvo.

    There is of course the OEM product, complete with Volvo logo - 39851597 - plus then a number of ebay specials, which claims that it will FIT this car.

    Yes, BUT....

    Due to the boot floor having the pop-up Grocery Holder, unless the mat folds, this feature becomes unusable.

    Some of the pirate mats do fold, but only in two parts, and from appearances it seems that the fold is not in the correct place - behind the hinge line of the pop-up flap.

    If it was, about 60% of the mat would be vertical, standing upright behind the rear seats, blocking your view out the rear window.

    Possibly in overseas markets there were more basic model Volvos for sale than here, but I have not yet seen a local one which just has a one-piece boot floor - where any of the above-mentioned mats would work just fine.

    The proper mat folds 3 ways, and provided your luggage is heavy enough, will be flat on the floor behind the grocery panel in this mode.

    Here it is, flat on the floor:
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    And here in the "stowed" position:
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    Note that it is only visible because there is nothing to weigh it down.

    I bought mine used off OLX, as the cheapest one on Ebay is R1400 - in Australia, which may or may not ship to SA.

    Generally shipping is quoted at between R2000 to R3000.

    So the cheapest would be from the local Volvo agents - surprise! - at R1909. They have stock at the warehouse, so after payment, you can get it the next day.

    Note the mat is made from plastic, not rubber, and is primarily used to contain fluid spillage - caught in the grooves - soil from nursery trips and dog hair.

    It is available in black and beige.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2019/09/09 at 02:31 PM.
    If my post insulted you, wonder where the smiley went .

    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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  6. #24
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Gravel cosmetic vulnerability

    In the recent softroader outing, one of the plastic door sill covers came off. Other than a few scratches, it did not suffer any cosmetic damage and has been refitted to the car.

    However, upon closer inspection I noticed the extensive pitting of the lower horizontal surface of the sill just behind the front wheels, caused by loose material being launched from unpaved surfaces. It looks like this:

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    All the black marks are actually pitting in the plastic, where the stone has cut through the paint and knocked a dent in the material.

    The car does have OEM mud flaps fitted, but they are obviously too small to prevent this. I regard this as a design flaw in both the panel and the mud flaps.

    On the Freelander 2 this panel was unpainted black plastic. I cannot claim that there was not any pitting, but it was not to the extent that I ever noticed it.

    As this cosmetic damage cannot be avoided on gravel roads, it may be useful to have this panel wrapped for some protection.

    Else, scour the scrapyards in the meantime for a set of these panels to replace when trading in.


    Edit: More detail. See installation and size of mudflaps below:

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    From this image, however small the front flaps may be, it seems unlikely for the sill section to the front of the jack indentation to be within reach of debris. Behind this point, yes.

    This makes me wonder if the pitting was not applied prior to me installing the mudflaps, after 18000km of running around "naked" in the Polokwane environment under the previous ownership.

    Edit 2: Following further damage to the same sill, it required replacement. Removing the mud flap from the front section, more pitting was revealed, previously hidden. It was therefore already there when I bought the car. This matches my theory above, as the mud flaps were fitted prior to the car taken on any gravel road by us. The sill was replaced by a used one from a 2012 model, and it came with the same lovely patina as the 2-year old one.

    If one intends taking the car on unpaved roads, it is pointless replacing the sill with a new one - R3500 primed from Volvo, plus then the cost of spraying to body colour, say another R1500, plus fitting. One good extensive Northern Cape gravel session and it will be well worn. As mentioned above, poor design. So fitting a used one for a third of the price makes more sense.

    And another thing, this must be the car with the thinnest paint on the plastic panels. Loading a bicycle on a hitch-mounted rack, and taking special care to see where the inboard pedal goes - either above or below, not ON the bumper - after doing this 3 times, you can be sure there will be scratches right through the paint showing the black plastic below.

    The Freelander 2 was white, and should have shown similar scratches even more, but no, it had a THICK WHITE primer below, much thicker than the paint actually.

    Which makes me wonder if Volvo perhaps uses air as a primer: "There, Sven, the dust is off. The part is now primed - go do your thing with the spray gun. And remember to spray evenly, but especially, thinly."
    Last edited by JJJ; 2020/01/09 at 11:56 AM.
    If my post insulted you, wonder where the smiley went .

    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

  7. #25
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    More on Ground Clearance and Underbody Protection

    In the maiden post of this thread, the following observations were made:

    The fuel tanks do not hang out below the floor of the vehicle, but is tucked in.
    The two tank halves even have plastic covers to keep the dirt off.
    The complete drive-train – Haldex 5 and differential – as well as the exhaust are also all tucked in. On the Freelander 2 the lowest part at the rear was the exhaust, where it had a kink just ahead of the rear axle.

    It was however only recently that I realized to which extent the above were improvements over the Freelander 2. This followed a few sessions underneath the car to measure up for metal fuel tank covers to replace the plastic ones referred to above. More on this to follow on the mods thread, hopefully by the weekend.

    So here's what the LR2 looks like from underneath:

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    Note where the exhaust runs relative to the rear differential, cross member, drive shafts and subframe. This could from time to time be heard to drag on the ground, especially when heavily laden over rutted gravel. Also note the dimpled Al foil heat shield for the fuel tanks - hence the additional Al tank covers.

    Now the XC60:

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    The LH tank is made slightly narrower than the RH at the rear - it still takes 72l - to allow for the exhaust to pass next to the Haldex and differential OVER the cross member. Also note the pressed steel tank covers. For clarity the plastic covers referred to above, have been removed. So where did the exhaust go?

    Aha, there it is! Running OVER the rear subframe.

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    As a result of this layout, it is probably a major undertaking to remove the rear muffler, but I sold my LR2 at just under 240k km with still the original exhaust on it, with absolutely no repairs.

    I am expecting at least the same from Volvo.

    The other disadvantage is that the boot is a lot shallower, only accommodating a space saver spare. No issue in this case, as the full size spare - when required - always goes outside on the tow ball for easy access anyway.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2020/02/05 at 06:36 AM.
    If my post insulted you, wonder where the smiley went .

    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

  8. #26
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Would you buy another Volvo?

    The above is the title of a thread on the UK Volvo forum.

    Here is a recent response:

    No. The regular failures and high maintenance costs have spoiled the experience for me. It’s one thing after another, and I've lost patience. It will be for sale as soon as I fix the current issue and hopefully before the next expensive item needs repairing!

    Initially, this seems like a valid response. If my car displayed the above symptoms, I would also sell it and not buy another. Which I did.

    This is until you notice in the signature, that this relates to a 2009 V70 2.4D (5-Cyl) with 120k miles, being run on biodiesel.

    The nature of the issues are not disclosed, except for this:

    The rising engine oil issue also worries me. My plan was to run this car for 4 years and get rid at around 200k miles, however even if I could fix all the issues I would be nervous that the engine would be worn much earlier.

    The above means that the plaintive bought this car in 2016 at the earliest, as it is now 2020, and his 4 year ownership goal has not been achieved as yet.

    Having said that, it’s the comfiest car I've ever owned, you can drive for hours in the somehow soft yet firm supportive magical seats on cruise and feel relaxed at the end of long journey. My other car is quite the opposite.

    So, not all bad, then?

    It’s quite sad, MY V70 when newer and working well would have been a superb car for its owner and certainly ticked my boxes, the unreliability issues are the killer.

    Right. So what was the owner thinking?
    · How long should a car last?
    · Does he know that the 3rd generation V70 – which his is, and which later morphed into the XC70 – is based on the Ford EUCD platform, which was the Freelander 2?
    · Did he do his homework to see what the basic design flaws were in the LR2, transferred to Volvos, e.g. same AW transmission – lucky for him, he has the manual – and a whining rear differential, etc.

    His main gripe is with a 5-cylinder diesel engine, which has been tweaked since the early nineties, being discontinued mid-2010s. So he bought a run-out model, with an engine on which even the manufacturer has given up by the time he bought the car. Should that not trigger some questions?

    It is short-sighted to buy a 7 year-old modern car – with even older engine technology – and then expect it to be as cheaply maintainable – or last as long - as a points-and-plugs model.

    What wrong with this argument is:
    · to extrapolate that all later cars of that brand will have similar issues
    · include the petrol engines
    · ignoring that brand ownership has since changed from Ford to Geely
    · ignoring that subsequent designs have won the European COTY awards for more than one of the new XC variants two years in a row.

    If you want to buy an older car, at least aim for the most recent engine and transmission change, which is still being used in the all-new model. In the case of Volvo, that would be post-2014.

    Ok, so would I buy another Volvo? Yes, but only after some extensive homework when the time comes, again .
    Last edited by JJJ; 2020/03/23 at 10:06 AM.
    If my post insulted you, wonder where the smiley went .

    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

  9. #27
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Quote Originally Posted by JJJ View Post
    Would you buy another Volvo?

    The above is the title of a thread on the UK Volvo forum.

    Here is a recent response:

    No. The regular failures and high maintenance costs have spoiled the experience for me. It’s one thing after another, and I've lost patience. It will be for sale as soon as I fix the current issue and hopefully before the next expensive item needs repairing!

    Initially, this seems like a valid response. If my car displayed the above symptoms, I would also sell it and not buy another. Which I did.

    This is until you notice in the signature, that this relates to a 2009 V70 2.4D (5-Cyl) with 120k miles, being run on biodiesel.

    The nature of the issues are not disclosed, except for this:

    The rising engine oil issue also worries me. My plan was to run this car for 4 years and get rid at around 200k miles, however even if I could fix all the issues I would be nervous that the engine would be worn much earlier.

    The above means that the plaintive bought this car in 2016 at the earliest, as it is now 2020, and his 4 year ownership goal has not been achieved as yet.

    Having said that, it’s the comfiest car I've ever owned, you can drive for hours in the somehow soft yet firm supportive magical seats on cruise and feel relaxed at the end of long journey. My other car is quite the opposite.

    So, not all bad, then?

    It’s quite sad, MY V70 when newer and working well would have been a superb car for its owner and certainly ticked my boxes, the unreliability issues are the killer.

    Right. So what was the owner thinking?
    · How long should a car last?
    · Does he know that the 3rd generation V70 – which his is, and which later morphed into the XC70 – is based on the Ford EUCD platform, which was the Freelander 2?
    · Did he do his homework to see what the basic design flaws were in the LR2, transferred to Volvos, e.g. same AW transmission – lucky for him, he has the manual – and a whining rear differential, etc.

    His main gripe is with a 5-cylinder diesel engine, which has been tweaked since the early nineties, being discontinued mid-2010s. So he bought a run-out model, with an engine on which even the manufacturer has given up by the time he bought the car. Should that not trigger some questions?

    It is short-sighted to buy a 7 year-old modern car – with even older engine technology – and then expect it to be as cheaply maintainable – or last as long - as a points-and-plugs model.

    What wrong with this argument is:
    · to extrapolate that all later cars of that brand will have similar issues
    · include the petrol engines
    · ignoring that brand ownership has since changed from Ford to Geely
    · ignoring that subsequent designs have won the European COTY awards for more than one of the new XC variants two years in a row.

    If you want to buy an older car, at least aim for the most recent engine and transmission change, which is still being used in the all-new model. In the case of Volvo, that would be post-2014.

    Ok, so would I buy another Volvo? Yes, but only after some extensive homework when the time comes, again .
    What is wrong with the 5 Cyl Diesel Volvo's? As far as I'm aware they do mega mileage with only cambelt services being out of the ordinary.

    That's why I bought the D5 - reliability. Oh and the 5 cyl sound of course. The current XC60's replacement will probably be the facelift (like yours) also with one of the last D5's.
    Current: 2013 Honda Insight Hybrid CVT
    Ex:
    2005 Volvo XC70 2.5T Geartronic

    SWAMBO: 2011 Volvo XC60 D5 AWD Geartronic

  10. #28
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    Default Re: Volvo XC60: Review

    Yes, I also thought those 5-cylinders were bullet proof. But as with anything, you do get the odd duff one.

    Sadly, all non-4-cylinder engines were discontinued by Volvo in 2014.

    All engines - petrol and diesel - are now 4cyl 2l, except for the T3 1.5l - which may actually be sourced from elsewhere - in various states of turbo- and supercharging as well as hybrid.

    Shortly, all Volvo diesel engines will be discontinued and full electric coming soon.

    My 2017 model - the 2014 face-lift - is already discontinued, with a brand new XC60 launched locally in that year.
    Last edited by JJJ; 2020/03/23 at 10:27 AM.
    If my post insulted you, wonder where the smiley went .

    Johnie
    Volvo XC60 T5
    180kW/350Nm (1500 - 4800 rpm)

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