Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018 - Page 5





Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 106
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Simons Town
    Posts
    636
    Thanked: 968

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    For those interested, our (simplified) GPS tracks can be found here.

    https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...8177025873&z=6
    Was up at Namibia/Angola border a few weeks back...is Angola a worthwhile trip?

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    54
    Posts
    295
    Thanked: 97

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Finn McCool View Post
    Was up at Namibia/Angola border a few weeks back...is Angola a worthwhile trip?
    Have you not read the report ?
    Gerrit Laubscher

    Angola sempre

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to lirritma For This Useful Post:


  4. #83
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Simons Town
    Posts
    636
    Thanked: 968

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by lirritma View Post
    Have you not read the report ?
    Ooooops...apologies just the route...thanks

  5. #84
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bloemfontein
    Age
    64
    Posts
    420
    Thanked: 103

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Thanks WW for your wonderful report, I've read it start to end and the photos make it all the more insightful. Well done to you two for the "guts" to take on a massive trip like that on your own, great respect to you folk.

    Your reports together with those of Stan and a few others sure set the standard as far as providing insights into what people can expect to along along the routes you've traveled.

    Much appreciated for all the time and effort you took to put your report together.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to wilfwalk For This Useful Post:


  7. #85
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Asante sana, wilfwalk.

  8. #86
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Birmingham
    Age
    32
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 2

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    It is always great to read about my country and about so many places where I have been myself! Thank you, WW.

    However, I couldn’t help to notice some things in your report which I would like to correct, point or inform.

    1- Places you missed
    You missed plenty of great things to see and visit (but you hit most of the beaten down tourist spots) and passed right by them. For example:
    • In Humpata, you missed the Dorsland Heritage (which is not in great shape anyways) and the Tchivinguilo School
    • In your way from Lubango to Lobito you missed: (1) big game sights in Quilengues, (2) a warm water lagoon in the top of a mountain near Chongoroi, (3) the pre-historic site and paintings just south of Benguela
    • From Lobito to Sumbe, you missed (1) Canjala, which was one of THE hot spots through the war. You could easily find there historic battle grounds and the best palm-oil and honey in Angola, and (2) the Sassa caves
    • I could go on, but it would be too long a list ��

    2- As information

    • Most Portuguese people left before the independence and through the early years of civil war. The ones that stayed fought on the side of the government (MPLA), except for very few ones. I am myself descendent from Portuguese, born and raised in Angola, in a farm in Canjala.
    • Wherever you got the landmines information from, it is overstated. Some locals like to overstate mine danger (and exaggerate stories in general) just for “the thrill” (the language barrier made you lose probably one of the best things in Angola: story telling) and guides will overstate too so that people keep relying on them to travel the country.
    • About not seeing much game, you would have if you just stepped a bit farther from the roads (150 meters?). However, I can recognise that with the fear of landmines, you probably would be afraid of even stepping out of the car to pee . The Cuando Cubango province, for example, is extremely rich in big game, including hippos, giraffes, buffalo, etc.
    • Your last ArtDeco Cinema picture from Lobito is not a cinema. It is still to this day a seafood restaurant, as it used to be before the independence.
    • Saying that the elite in Angola speak English is another overstatement. Most clearly don’t (Elite or not).
    • The Angolan young man singing the Hallelujah Chorus shouldn’t be surprising for you, afterall, Angola is almost 85% catholic and we do watch movies (which tend to overuse Hallelujah Chorus) ��.

    3- At the border crossing to Namibia

    • There are souvenirs you can buy in Angola, especially local made wood statues and masks.
    • The reason why they asked about souvenirs is due to the common practice of smuggling diamonds inside said statues. If you had one, the border agent would probably try to find out if it was hollow inside.
    • The glove thing was just part of “protocol”. You are lucky, they were probably feeling good that day, as most of the times they don’t bother to use (or don’t have) gloves.

    And finally, as a question, can someone please explain to me: Why, with so many great places to visit and routes to take in Angola, most overlanding people do the same route (Ruacana-Soyo and back)?

    Again, great report!
    Last edited by Mr.Outlander; 2018/09/17 at 08:54 PM. Reason: Some format errors

  9. #87
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Hello Mr Outlander and welcome to the forum. Thank you for posting your observations and questions.

    You will obviously have much to contribute to this forum on Angola. It is a shame that you werenít active on the forum when we (and others) were researching trips to Angola. I presume that you live in the original Birmingham and not Birmingham, Alabama or any other later named town from the one and only Brum.

    To comment on your places missed:

    1. With only 30 days allowed within Angola on our visas, there were compromises we had to make on what could realistically be achieved. There were some places that we knew about and deliberately didnít visit on your list (such as the Afrikaner grave sites at Humpata), and some places we didnít know about (the warm water lagoon on the mountain, and the school near Lubango). There is a dearth of information available on Angola (in English at least) and we based our research on trip reports, the Bradt guide to Angola, and looking at Angolan based tour operatorsí itineraries.
    2. Our priority in Angola was not wildlife (and everyone agrees that the wildlife has been decimated during the 40 years of war). I was born and brought up in Kenya which has game a-plenty. This is the reason we did not go to Kissama Park which, I understand, is one of the few places where there is some game to be seen by tourists and with some tourism infrastructure.
    3. We could have visited the Sassa caves near Sumbe, but chose not to. A shame, but there we are. We passed through Canjala on a terrible diversion and not being South African didnít really want to see that battlefield site.


    Your comments on information:
    1. According to the Mine Action Group and the HALO Trust, https://www.maginternational.org/dow...593584226ab90/ only 56% of the landmine contaminated areas have been successfully cleared. It is also thought that approximately 20 million landmines were laid during the years of conflict. It is well advised to be wary of the potential danger of landmines and unexploded ordnance, and we were careful without becoming obsessed about the danger.
    2. We drove through a large swathe of Cuando Cubango province, but did not see any game even beside the Cubango river. I am very glad to hear that there is still game in that province and would be interested to know how one accesses those areas as most land seemed to be privately owned or owned by the community - or, more importantly, didnít have any roads or tracks into the bush.
    3. Thank you for the correction that the last photo of the Art Deco California in Lubito is a seafood restaurant. I will correct that.
    4. I think the rhetorical questions in my trip report have lost their humour in translation. They were just rhetorical questions and not meant to impugne on the religious education or musical knowledge of the Angolan policemen. I still do find it extraordinary that we sang the Hallelujah Chorus from Handelís Messiah (with the libretto in English) in the dark with two policemen above Calandula Falls. It was a humourous and surreal occasion.
    5. We did meet many Angolans of Portuguese ancestry who spoke excellent English. Of course, not all Angolans of Portuguese ancestry spoke English, but many did.


    At the border crossing into Namibia:
    1. I am sorry if we missed buying wooden souvenirs. We certainly did not see any, but we werenít really at the few places where tourists visit so we didnít see any for sale. We did, however, see large pestles and mortars for sale along the road at times. We did not have room in our Land Rover for such large items. I am, however, glad we didnít if such things are often used for smuggling diamonds...
    2. Again, I think the intended humour (with regard to the customs official and the latex gloves) has been lost in translation. Of course, it was protocol on his part. I was making a joke about the accumulation of dust within our Land Rover.


    Apropos your very pertinent question about the route most overlanders take in Angola. Of course, most people enter Angola from the south and it seems to me to be the best and purest route to visit the fabulously beautiful Iona National Park first and then work oneís way north to the Congo rivermouth. There are overlanders who have come down from West Africa and the DRC.

    It would be enormously helpful if you could post a thread on the forum with your recommended route around the highlights of Angola and with recommended places to stay or camp enroute (quarry pits included). This would assist others planning a trip to Angola. There is currently a German from Dresden asking many questions on the forum and I am sure you will be able to help him.

    Thank you for contributing your knowledge on Angola and I am sure there will be many people on the forum who will be looking forward to your insights.

    Best wishes and thanks.

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Wazungu Wawili For This Useful Post:


  11. #88
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Kloof
    Age
    63
    Posts
    341
    Thanked: 817

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Really enjoyed the report and pictures. Thank you for the hard work in writing it all up.

    2015 Suzuki Grand Vitara Summit M/T

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Ian.McM For This Useful Post:


  13. #89
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Birmingham
    Age
    32
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 2

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Hello, Wazungu Wawili! Thank you for welcoming me. Yes, I am currently in the original Birmingham, the one and only �� !

    Straight away:
    Please, don’t get me wrong on the humorous parts. I thought your observations were funny (to be honest, I was surprised the policemen decided to be so nice instead of trying to take advantage of you). Just pointed out those things in case anyone misinterpreted them. Also, I was trying to be humorous too when I said that we do watch movies.

    On the places missed:

    • About the Visas, I do think they can still be relatively easy to extend. Even tho’ you would probably have to stop for some days to gain another 30 days in your stay. However, my experience might not be the best, since the only person I regularly have extending the tourist visa to Angola is my Vietnamese wife, thus, requirements/rules may be slightly different.
    • The lagoon is amongst the “secret” places there. Most Angolans are not aware of it either. It is well known amongst the locals of Chongoroi, tho'.
    • Trust me, the information is extremely limited even in Portuguese or in any other language. Tourism, especially off-road/overlanding, is not exactly a “thing” for locals. On top of that, tour operators (locals and foreigners) tend to stay close to the coast and the western part of the country, which are the most “developed” and less hit by the war. Trusting them can severely limit your experience of the country.
    • Yes, game in Angola is not as it used to be, and God forbid me from trying to compare to Kenya as a person who enjoys hunting, I believe we still have a sizeable animal population, however, as you said, with no tourist infrastructure around. The ability to contact locals and to gain access to their lands and local knowledge, however, can open many opportunities, including to see the famous “Palanca Negra Gigante” in its natural habitat. Also, the fear of the “leftovers of the war” (aka mines) have an impact on people not looking for it. Jamba, for example, is one of those places with much game, but people usually avoid due to its “story2 in the war.



    On information:

    • Yes, the number of mines is extremely high. However, most of the “dangerous places” are deep inside the bush. Most places with local population around have no mines at all, or, if they do have mines, the locals are a good source of information of what/where to avoid, afterall, they have been there throughout the worse of it. If anyone knows what to avoid, its them.
    • About the mines I also must add that in some cases of land marked as containing mines, it is really just a “trick” that the “powerful” use to discourage people from accessing those areas while they explore it, whether it is for wood, agriculture, etc.



    On the border crossing
    • It is easy to miss the souvenirs. To be honest, I think there are fewer and fewer artisans around. Hey, maybe I will start my own business of Angolan souvenirs
    • Again, I understood the humour. And again, I commented on that mainly because I was surprised they actually used gloves. In my head, they were just showing off to you



    Thank you for the help on understanding the “popular route”. I was convinced it was mainly due to influence of guides such as Mr. Koos. As a personal opinion based on my experience, I think this route leaves too much out (not even locals usually do it). In my opinion, the best of Angola, for overlanding and 4x4 experiences, is mostly on the centre, east and south-east of the country. Time and being ready for very limited infrastructure, however, is paramount to enjoy that.

    I will take some time soon to try and write a thread on recommended routes and places to visit in Angola. I can, however, give a spoiler alert: there aren’t many places to stay. Wild camping is the norm. I will be travelling through Angola again hopefully next year, departing from Namibia. Maybe will be able to get a convoy going with me. Many thanks again for your report. I can’t even start to describe the pleasure I felt reading your experiences and remembering many experiences I myself went through. And, please, don’t get my commentaries wrongly, as it wasn’t my intention to be rude or something.

    Best wishes
    Last edited by Mr.Outlander; 2018/09/18 at 09:33 PM.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Mr.Outlander For This Useful Post:


  15. #90
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Menongue
    Age
    49
    Posts
    12
    Thanked: 8

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Hi Wazungu

    On the road from Menongue to Catuitui, the tank is a PT76, also called a floating tank. It is equipped with a 76.2mm gun. The car at Capico Mission station, close to Caiundo is an amphibious scout car, called a BRDM-2. It has a 14,5mm gun, and is also fully amphibious.
    The monument at Cuito Cuanavale was constructed and artwork done by North Korea. The smaller monument was first done by the Chinese.
    We broke ground for that project on 23 March 2008, and had a moer of a party under a tree next to the airfield.
    Cheers

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to StefvanWyk For This Useful Post:


  17. #91
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Hi Stefan

    Thank you very much for your post. Fascinating about the building of the monument at Cuito Cuanavale. North Korea? The mind boggles...

    The wreck we thought was a South African self-propelled howitzer was on the east side of the road between Cuito Cuanavale and Menongue. There was no Cyrillic lettering on the ďtankĒ, but there was some Latin lettering. Very difficult to identify and we take your expert word for it.

    Yes, we appear to have been a little confused between a BTR60 and the BRDM2. Both were ďexportedĒ to Angola, but one has four wheels and the other eight.

    Best wishes.

  18. #92
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    62
    Posts
    10,055
    Thanked: 2529

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    North Korea? The mind boggles...
    As far as I know, Mansudae also recently got the contract to remodel State House in Windhoek...

    From Wikipedia: Mansudae Overseas Projects is a construction company based in Jongphyong-dong, Phyongchon District, Pyongyang, North Korea.[1][2] It is the international commercial division of the Mansudae Art Studio.[3] As of August 2011, it had earned an estimated US$ 160 million overseas building monuments and memorials. As of 2015, Mansudae projects have been built in 17 countries: Angola, Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Cambodia, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Germany, Malaysia, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Senegal, Togo and Zimbabwe. The company uses North Korean artists, engineers, and construction workers rather than those of the local artists and workers. Sculptures, monuments, and buildings are in the style of North Korean socialist realism
    Tony Weaver

    1991 Land Rover 110 Hi-Line S/W 3.5l V8 carburettor
    Cooper Discoverer STT tyres, four sleeper Echo rooftop tent
    2012 Mitsubishi Outlander.

    Previously Land Rover 1968 SII, 1969 SIIA, 1973 SIII, 1983 Toyota HiLux 2litre, 2006 Land Rover Freelander TD4 HSE.

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Tony Weaver For This Useful Post:


  20. #93
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Completely fascinating. Thanks Tony.

  21. #94
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Menongue
    Age
    49
    Posts
    12
    Thanked: 8

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Morning Wazungu

    The two models were indeed imported in big numbers into Angola. They share a common turret, with the 14,5mm cannon mounted in the turret. They designed this low silhouette turret without a hatch.
    The BRDM-2 is a scout car and came first into service, then the BTR-60 which carries 8 troops came into service later copying the turret.
    Interesting fact is that both has 8 wheels.
    On the BRDM-2 you normally see only the 4 main wheels, as it has only four wheel arches. Then when you look under the belly of the car, you will see four more balloon tyres tucked in under the belly. Those are chain driven tyres, and the driver will use those 4 in extreme conditions like the nice Cuando Cubango sand. The BRDM-2 at Capico Mission Station is missing it's four belly wheels, it might have been commissioned for a sports model ox wagon, as they normally build them with the heaviest truck axle and tires available.
    The detail that the North Korean artists applied when they did the bronze sculpture work at the CC museum is amazing.
    Cheers

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to StefvanWyk For This Useful Post:


  23. #95
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Malelane
    Age
    61
    Posts
    5
    Thanked: 3

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Morning Wazungu
    I'm going to Angola in 3 weeks time and have tried to get 3rd party insurance but no luck so far. Can you please assist me with the insurance company that you have used.
    Regards Lafras

  24. #96
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Lafras1958 View Post
    Morning Wazungu
    I'm going to Angola in 3 weeks time and have tried to get 3rd party insurance but no luck so far. Can you please assist me with the insurance company that you have used.
    Regards Lafras


    Third Party Insurance is required - see https://www.businesswire.com/news/ho...ce-Report/news. Prior to our trip, I contacted various people who had been to Angola before. This included people who are guides on tours they take into Angola from Namibia and South Africa, people who had been on these guided trips, solo travellers and fellow overlanders. The answers I received did not fit with what we have experienced through 20 or so African countries. Through a friend, I was put in contact with an insurance broker in Luanda. He reiterated that third party insurance is compulsory in Angola Ė and be very aware of the consequences of travelling without it. We took out Third Party Insurance through AIB (www.aib-brokers.com), paid by an international transfer, and received the documentation via email. Having driven Angolan roads, with thick elephant grass up to the edge, children appearing out of the elephant grass close to oneís wheels, and the standard of driving on many roads, it would be foolhardy to travel in Angola without this compulsory

  25. The Following User Says Thank You to Wazungu Wawili For This Useful Post:


  26. #97
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Roodekrans
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,005
    Thanked: 140

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Lafras1958 View Post
    Morning Wazungu
    I'm going to Angola in 3 weeks time and have tried to get 3rd party insurance but no luck so far. Can you please assist me with the insurance company that you have used.
    Regards Lafras
    You get that at the border from Customs.

  27. #98
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by 0000ms View Post
    You get that at the border from Customs.
    The piece of paper you get from Customs for the cost of 4336 Kwanzas is the temporary import permit for the vehicle - it does not include third party insurance.

    At the Ruacana border there are no provisions for obtaining third party insurance - I donít know about the main border crossings.

  28. #99
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Roodekrans
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,005
    Thanked: 140

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018


  29. #100
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanked: 971

    Default Re: Angola Trip Report: 30 May to 26 June 2018

    Quote Originally Posted by 0000ms View Post
    There certainly wasnít any insurance company called Oshi at the Ruacana border. Or any other insurance people - only immigration, customs and police. Neither did we see anything remotely like an insurance company when we exited Angola at Katwitwi.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •