Rooftop spotlights advice - Page 4




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  1. #61
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Poen View Post
    On a Cape to Cairo trip I will start off by selecting a diesel vehicle that can run on rubbish fuel. Secondly, I will select a vehicle which can carry extra fuel, water and and an extra spare wheel.

    Your Jimny is a lovely toy to have a lot of fun with, but not a vehicle that I will select to cross continents with. It is not designed to carry the load of indispensables one needs to cart along.

    Perhaps you should talk to operators like those doing the Namib crossing, and get some vehicle options. They have experience of what works and what does not.

    By the way, all you will achieve with those extra lights is to further overload your vehicle and to give cause to be pulled off by traffic police. Rather replace your headlight bulbs with upgraded ones. Take a cue from the Voetspore guys. No image gadgetry, only indispensables.
    Geesh an 80 year old travel in 20 year old conquest car from cape to london.

    The jimny is more than capable stock standard. Maybe not the luxury you are after but obvious you have not travelled much into africa.

    And there has been jimnies already that made such trips. Just saying.

    One instance comming to mind is teamtane with an epic 7000km trip into africa and off main roads.
    Last edited by johan65; 2018/07/11 at 06:51 PM.
    O▮▮▮▮▮O

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  3. #62
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    A Jimney should have no problem to complete a Cape to Cairo trip – obviously dependent on the route you intend taking. A few years ago a similar trip was undertaken by a group of guys in Mini Coopers, and if they could do it, just about any vehicle should be able to do it.

    BUT

    If you intend tackling the route unsupported, you have to keep in mind that your vehicle is very small with regards to the volume and weight that it can carry. You also need to keep your vehicle as standard and as legal as possible. You do not need trouble with the authorities along the way because your vehicle is overloaded, not roadworthy, your paperwork is not in order, etc, etc

    I have been overlanding seriously for the past 24 years, during which time I have travelled more than 1m km. My longest trip was 39 days in duration, but I have never tackled a trip of the magnitude you are contemplating. I would suggest that you approach Tony Weaver, of this Forum, for advice as he certainly has the knowledge to assist you. I would also suggest that you try to get hold of the following book : “ Getaway guide Cape to Cairo” by Mike Copeland : ISBN1 919 93807 9. This book is a few years old, but contains a lot of pertinent information.

    When deciding on what to load, your manta should be “weight is the enemy !” On an overloaded vehicle the suspension and tyres suffer, and this is something you should avoid at all costs. As a long standing/serious hiker I would recommend that you look at hiking gear to keep the volume and weight down. On a 5 day unsupported hiking trail, my backpack pulls the scale at ±25 kg, and that includes a tent. On an 8 day trip, I go up to 30kg, but the extra weight is made up of food and becomes less fast.

    Forget about a rooftop tent. Depending on the brand it can weigh anything between 50 and 100kg, and take up all the space on your roof. A 2-man hiking tent is about 2.5 to 3kg, an inflatable mattress about 500g and a down sleeping bag about 1 kg. Forget about Cadac gas bottles and cooker tops. Get yourself a MSR multi fuel stove. It is small and very light and can burn any fuel. On a hike I use less than 100ml of fuel a day. Don’t carry a dual battery system or solar panels. The battery is about 24kg on its own. If you want to take a fridge along run it straight off the vehicle battery with a solenoid to cut the power when the engine is not running. Get a proper compressor fridge. It also serves as a good cooler box. If you want to carry sand ladders, take plastic ones and not metal ones. Carry some military-type sandbags under the seat. They are very versatile items in a recovery operation. For a spade, carry one of the green and yellow Lasher Lady spades, and shorten the handle and sharpen the side edges of the blade so that you can also chop with it. A high-lift jack is a very versatile tool, but takes up space, and is very heavy. Buy the real thing and not one of the cheap knock-offs. You will need to carry a serious first-aid kit.

    Enjoy the planning !


    Johan
    2011 Daihatsu Terios 4x4
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  5. #63
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    Jimny will easily do it (I drive one) your major challenge is weight. Jimny's load factor is less than half of a Hilux.

    When we bought Jimny most of our old heavy camping kit was sold and replaced with light and compact equipment. We actually weighed our new kit to ensure the car was not overloaded!

    “Africa changes you forever, like nowhere on earth. Once you have been there, you will never be the same." - Ernest Hemingway

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  7. #64
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Altus 4x4 View Post
    It's more a precaution. I'm not planning on night driving but I'd rather have it and not need it than not having it and need it.
    Don't MOUNT them - that's for pretenders...
    Get them fitted to strong magnets and put them up "when you need them".

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  9. #65
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    Hi there. We've done Cape to Cape (Agulhas to North Cape, Norway) via Cairo and apart from South Africa itself you are very unlikely to find any official at least on your route through Africa who will be the least interested or knowledgeable about what lights you may have on your vehicle. Should you head further north into the EU however you might well do so.

    That said it is most definitely NOT advisable to drive anywhere in southern, east or north Africa at night unless you must. Roads in Africa to the north of us tend to be not just populated, both night time and in daylight, by people on foot or maybe bikes or motor bikes with little road sense, animals both wild and domesticated with none, and vehicles very often with zero lights front or back. Fitting additional lights on your vehicle provides little if any "protection" from any of these hazards in my experience, especially when animals come at you from the side. Unless you are forced to drive at night in this region my advice is don't. And remember anything that is nice and shiny on a vehicle that can be easily unbolted when you're not looking can be very tempting.... Have fun on your trip. And if you think SA drivers leave a lot to be desired in terms of driving standards just wait till you hit Cairo!
    Jambo7

    London to Sydney 1968 East Africa 2001 Southern & East Africa 2004 & 2006
    Australia 2007 Cape Agulhas to North Cape, Norway 2009/10
    Ushuaia, Argentina to Deadhorse, Alaska 2012/13, Southern Africa 2015 & 2017

    DON'T JUST DREAM IT - DO IT!


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  11. #66
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jambo7 View Post

    That said it is most definitely NOT advisable to drive anywhere in southern, east or north Africa at night unless you must. Roads in Africa to the north of us tend to be not just populated, both night time and in daylight, by people on foot or maybe bikes or motor bikes with little road sense, animals both wild and domesticated with none, and vehicles very often with zero lights front or back. Fitting additional lights on your vehicle provides little if any "protection" from any of these hazards in my experience, especially when animals come at you from the side. Unless you are forced to drive at night in this region my advice is don't. And remember anything that is nice and shiny on a vehicle that can be easily unbolted when you're not looking can be very tempting....
    Maybe this should the final say on the say on the matter of night driving in Africa.............and rooftop lights in general
    2012 Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6
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  13. #67
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    Default Re: Rooftop spotlights advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jambo7 View Post
    Hi there. We've done Cape to Cape (Agulhas to North Cape, Norway) via Cairo and apart from South Africa itself you are very unlikely to find any official at least on your route through Africa who will be the least interested or knowledgeable about what lights you may have on your vehicle. Should you head further north into the EU however you might well do so.

    That said it is most definitely NOT advisable to drive anywhere in southern, east or north Africa at night unless you must. Roads in Africa to the north of us tend to be not just populated, both night time and in daylight, by people on foot or maybe bikes or motor bikes with little road sense, animals both wild and domesticated with none, and vehicles very often with zero lights front or back. Fitting additional lights on your vehicle provides little if any "protection" from any of these hazards in my experience, especially when animals come at you from the side. Unless you are forced to drive at night in this region my advice is don't. And remember anything that is nice and shiny on a vehicle that can be easily unbolted when you're not looking can be very tempting.... Have fun on your trip. And if you think SA drivers leave a lot to be desired in terms of driving standards just wait till you hit Cairo!
    Wow that sounds amazing. Thank you for the advice! What vehicle did you use?

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