Venter Trailer for Offroad - Page 2




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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by RogueFrontier View Post
    I really can not see a 10", 13" or 14" will make any difference on a trailer.
    A trailer is towed and needs the minimum of grip.

    You would also notice most new trailers come with the crappiest of tyres. It does not need to steer or accelerate. If you are lucky, it will do some braking. PS - I will never buy a trailer without breaks. You will know what I'm talking about the 1st emergency brake you do.

    I would also rather have a smaller rim with a tyre with sufficient sidewall so you can blow down nicely without knocking the rim on the road like you would have with low profile tyres.

    My biggest issue is that trailers arnt fitted with shocks, causing all types of harmonics and resultant stress fatigue on many components, including the tow bar.
    Even at 1.8bar, I can see how MY trailers bounce about on tar roads. 1.6bar is my experimentally determined happy point on tar. You will feel the tow vehicle going over a bump/dip in the road and my trailer would not react more than the towing vehicle. By the time the car is settled, the trailer is also settled. I'm happy with that.
    I think what is said on this thread should be a guide to you, but you will need to find what works for you and your setup.

    Every hour or so, we stop for a smokebreak where I feel each car and trailer tyre and the trailer bearing caps. Typically the trailer tyres are cooler than the tow vehicle's tyres, so, I'm by far not abusing my trailer's tyres by running them to flat.

    My trailer has 4 tyres, so, your happy point could be a bit higher pressures than mine.
    I recently took out a 5m, 4ton dual axle trailer. It was also very restless. I werent going to be loading it to capacity, so, I dropped the pressures from 3bar to 1.5bar as well. It was so much happier tow afterwards.

    Getting back to crappy tyres. Most gravel roads I tow is just gravel and the standard road tyres are fine. If you are going to be towing on shale or thorny areas, I would consider a hardier AT tyre.

    Like I said before, I use 0.9bar on gravel and would even drop it a bit more for bad corrugation. At least softer then the towing vehicle.
    Wheel size does make a huge difference A 10" spins a heck of a lot faster than a 13" at the same speed so you need to travel much slower with deflated 10s than 13s to avoid heat build up and damage to the tyre (sidewall flex)
    A 70profile on a 10" has less sidewall height than a 13" so one can deflate the 13" more for a smoother ride.
    Last time I looked it was pretty difficult to get 10s and there was only one size available.
    On a 10" the load limit on a single axle is 620Kg if memory serves where a 13" can go the full 750 kg

    Believe me there is a loot more to wheels and wheel sizes than just grip
    Henk
    Adventure is out there go find it

    Fitment and trailer service. Agent for Metalian & Tentco
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  2. #22
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackie View Post
    I don't exactly get this - are you saying that a 14 inch at lets say 1.8 bar will "shake itself to death" but not a 13 inch at the same pressure?
    Yes. The 195R14C tyre at 1.8 bar has a much higher carrying capacity vs the 155 13 inch tyre. As a simple example. If I deliver trailers with 14 inch wheels I drop the tyre pressure as low as 0.5 bar if its long distance. If you tow an empty piggy back trailer with the wheels at say the prescribed 2 - 2.5 bar for loading a reasonable distance, you can be guaranteed that something will be broken, mudguards etc.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by Boslover View Post
    Vervang jou blad vere sit groter wiele op teminste 13 duim gaan praat met die ouens wat off roads accessories opsit hoor wat se skokbrekers jy kan insit nousecone versterk waar hy geweld is maak seker welding sal hou en ja beskerm jou nosecone sterkte Laaste maar nie die minste upgrade jou as se dra kapasiteid
    I wouldnt recommend stronger leaf springs unless loading heavier.

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  5. #24
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel 4x4 View Post
    Ek sien my Nosecone is vasgebout (die nosecone is appart van die hoof laai gedeelte)
    Just check for tearing where the bolts are through. If they are tightened properly there should be no issues. If you have the time, take it off, put a bit of sika where the nose cone contacts the a frame, then bolt back with a bit of loctite on the bolts

  6. #25
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by RogueFrontier View Post
    I really can not see a 10", 13" or 14" will make any difference on a trailer.
    A trailer is towed and needs the minimum of grip.

    You would also notice most new trailers come with the crappiest of tyres. It does not need to steer or accelerate. If you are lucky, it will do some braking. PS - I will never buy a trailer without breaks. You will know what I'm talking about the 1st emergency brake you do.

    I would also rather have a smaller rim with a tyre with sufficient sidewall so you can blow down nicely without knocking the rim on the road like you would have with low profile tyres.

    My biggest issue is that trailers arnt fitted with shocks, causing all types of harmonics and resultant stress fatigue on many components, including the tow bar.
    Even at 1.8bar, I can see how MY trailers bounce about on tar roads. 1.6bar is my experimentally determined happy point on tar. You will feel the tow vehicle going over a bump/dip in the road and my trailer would not react more than the towing vehicle. By the time the car is settled, the trailer is also settled. I'm happy with that.
    I think what is said on this thread should be a guide to you, but you will need to find what works for you and your setup.

    Every hour or so, we stop for a smokebreak where I feel each car and trailer tyre and the trailer bearing caps. Typically the trailer tyres are cooler than the tow vehicle's tyres, so, I'm by far not abusing my trailer's tyres by running them to flat.

    My trailer has 4 tyres, so, your happy point could be a bit higher pressures than mine.
    I recently took out a 5m, 4ton dual axle trailer. It was also very restless. I werent going to be loading it to capacity, so, I dropped the pressures from 3bar to 1.5bar as well. It was so much happier tow afterwards.

    Getting back to crappy tyres. Most gravel roads I tow is just gravel and the standard road tyres are fine. If you are going to be towing on shale or thorny areas, I would consider a hardier AT tyre.

    Like I said before, I use 0.9bar on gravel and would even drop it a bit more for bad corrugation. At least softer then the towing vehicle.
    Its more a ground clearance issue. Going to 13 inch will give you quite a bit more at a reasonable amount of money. Then as Henk mentioned, the 10 inch wheels spin quite fast compared to 13 inch which means bearings take a beating. Lastly, potholes can swallow a 10 inch a lot easier than a 13 inch.

  7. #26
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by hbannink View Post
    Wheel size does make a huge difference A 10" spins a heck of a lot faster than a 13" at the same speed so you need to travel much slower with deflated 10s than 13s to avoid heat build up and damage to the tyre (sidewall flex)
    A 70profile on a 10" has less sidewall height than a 13" so one can deflate the 13" more for a smoother ride.
    Last time I looked it was pretty difficult to get 10s and there was only one size available.
    On a 10" the load limit on a single axle is 620Kg if memory serves where a 13" can go the full 750 kg

    Believe me there is a loot more to wheels and wheel sizes than just grip
    Henk - I mostly agree with you. 10" and 12" are obsolete and expensive when you get them.

    However, the point I'm trying to make is that they will still get you to your destination without issues. Unless the money in your wallet is bothering you, there is no technical reason to be paranoid about 10" tyres.

    To nitpic some comments...
    10" tyres are 80 profile. I have more sidewall than e.g. 155x70R13. Besides, profile is related to tyre width and not rim size. I'm more worried about ppl deciding to go to 50 profile 13s, like the Mini guys do. That will not blow down nicely.
    My 10" tyres have a T speed rating. If I were to tow at 190kph, I for sure would use an appropriate tyre pressure!
    When I blow the trailer tyres down, I will have blown the Isuzu's tyres as well. That pretty much limits my whole rigs speed to 80kph on gravel - by choice.
    Like I said before, every hour or so, irrelevant of surface, I go feel the tyres and they always feel cool. Definitely cooler than the Isuzu's tyres.
    According to Errol's, my 69 load tyres gives me 650kg, but your point is valid. I have way more serious psychological problems if I'm taking more than 650kg of camping kit along!

    Henk, I was trying to factual and hope you have a thick enough skin not to be upset. If you are, I'll buy you a beer one day when we meet.
    -----------------------------
    Isuzu Frontier 280LX 4x4 2001

  8. #27
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by RogueFrontier View Post
    Henk - I mostly agree with you. 10" and 12" are obsolete and expensive when you get them.

    However, the point I'm trying to make is that they will still get you to your destination without issues. Unless the money in your wallet is bothering you, there is no technical reason to be paranoid about 10" tyres.

    To nitpic some comments...
    10" tyres are 80 profile. I have more sidewall than e.g. 155x70R13. Besides, profile is related to tyre width and not rim size. I'm more worried about ppl deciding to go to 50 profile 13s, like the Mini guys do. That will not blow down nicely.
    My 10" tyres have a T speed rating. If I were to tow at 190kph, I for sure would use an appropriate tyre pressure!
    When I blow the trailer tyres down, I will have blown the Isuzu's tyres as well. That pretty much limits my whole rigs speed to 80kph on gravel - by choice.
    Like I said before, every hour or so, irrelevant of surface, I go feel the tyres and they always feel cool. Definitely cooler than the Isuzu's tyres.
    According to Errol's, my 69 load tyres gives me 650kg, but your point is valid. I have way more serious psychological problems if I'm taking more than 650kg of camping kit along!

    Henk, I was trying to factual and hope you have a thick enough skin not to be upset. If you are, I'll buy you a beer one day when we meet.
    My trailer tyres are 155/80/13
    Last edited by Rebel 4x4; 2018/07/09 at 06:35 PM.
    Sent from my iPhone


  9. #28
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel 4x4 View Post
    Excuse me if this was discussed before, I tried to search via the tapatalk app but the searching is somewhat limited.

    I have a very good condition Venter, gathering dust - so to speak. I would like to use it for camping purposes, and would like to take the trailer offroad (actually gravel) once in a while.

    Now I do recall comments made by members, that don't recommend driving a Venter on a gravel road. Over the weekend I tried to see on the trailer itself, what would the issue be if one would drive on a gravel road with the Venter. The only issue I see is the small wheels. But I do recall people mentioning the trailer will 'fall apart'. Is this due to the shaking and the welds will break loose?

    I'm not considering taking it into the bush, just gravel road.

    If some minor modification is required, what items need to be replaced to make it more 'gravelworthy'?

  10. #29
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Probably the three most important aspects to consider are 1) How strong/durable is the frame & coupling, 2) tyre rims/tyres and 2) axle rating?
    * You do not want to have a breakdown with a damaged trailer coupling.
    * At least 14, but preferably 15 inch wheels with steel rims fitted with commercial tyres are recommended.
    A fully laden trailer with a low axle rating will not cope with the forces that easily doubles when you hit a bump or a dip. An axle rating of around 1.5 tons will suffice for a 750 kg trailer.
    Rather sell your Venter trailer and buy a more sturdy/durable trailer, which you could modify and kit out as you go along.
    Last edited by JDW; 2018/07/09 at 08:19 AM.

  11. #30
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    I also use a normal old Venter trailer on 10 inch wheels for camping and usually drive on gravel mountain roads.

    My trailer tire pressure mimics the vehicle tire pressure.

    Tar road loaded: 200-230 @ 100km/h

    Gravel loaded: 1.4-1.6 @ 20 to 60km/h

    I normally go offroad for 3 to 7 days and only reinflate for the trip home. If I have to drive small sections of tar roads I stay under 80km/h.

    Would like to know what pressure you guys are pumping?
    Last edited by DC Polokwane; 2018/07/16 at 09:21 AM.
    Jeep Grand Cherokee 2002 4.7 V8

  12. #31
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Hi,

    I agree with the sentiment of the replies totally.

    I have been towing the same Karet 1800T (6ft) road trailer for the last 18 years behind SJ's, Vitara's and now my Jimny. It is stock standard as far as mechanical stuff goes, while being fitted with a 55lt water tank and a roof top tent!

    It has seen extensive travel in South Africa, Swaziland, Namibia, Lesotho, and Botswana over the years. This included when I was involved with the Desert Race in Botswana. During all this time it has regularly been "off road" behind my vehicle. I have travelled gravel roads, jeep tracks, sand, and even a few non tar mountain passes. But it will never be taken on anything resembling a grade 3 or worse obstacle course type trail. It is used to get me and my kit to my destination or base camp, and for this it has proved to be perfect.

    Today it is still mechanically sound and ready for my next trip.

    However, as mentioned by others, tyres are looked after and pressures are dropped when on gravel or off road. I don't drive like a hooligan, and I take it relatively slow. I can cruse at around 110 on the open road, but I slow down quite drastically when on gravel or off road.

    If you look after it and treat it appropriately I don't see any issues.

    And finally, yes mine is still running 10" tyres and rims. I have been lucky and got a spare set a few years ago so the availability issue hasn't struck me yet, although this will most likely be the problem in coming months when I start looking for my 3rd set of tyres.

    And these small trailers tow very nicely behind a SJ or a Jimny.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Ericl; 2018/07/12 at 09:33 PM.
    Eric
    ZS6 EPL / ORRA - T60
    ---------------------

    ME_______ - '09 SUZUKI JIMNY - Pipe Bumper / Under body Protection / Winch / Snorkel / Roof Rack / VHF+UHF Comms
    SWAMBO__ - MAHINDRA BOLERO - Feels like an SJ / loads like a truck / tows like a tank!
    RETIRED___ - '99 Gen 1 Grand Vitara / 1.6 Vitara JLX ...x2 / SJ413 SWB ...x3 / SJ413LWB ...x1 / SJ410 ...x2.

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  14. #32
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    Default Re: Venter Trailer for Offroad

    Quote Originally Posted by Ericl View Post
    Hi,

    I agree with the sentiment of the replies totally.

    I have been towing the same Karet 1800T (6ft) road trailer for the last 18 years behind SJ's, Vitara's and now my Jimny. It is stock standard as far as mechanical stuff goes, while being fitted with a 55lt water tank and a roof top tent!

    It has seen extensive travel in South Africa, Swaziland, Namibia, Lesotho, and Botswana over the years. This included when I was involved with the Desert Race in Botswana. During all this time it has regularly been "off road" behind my vehicle. I have travelled gravel roads, jeep tracks, sand, and even a few non tar mountain passes. But it will never be taken on anything resembling a grade 3 or worse obstacle course type trail. It is used to get me and my kit to my destination or base camp, and for this it has proved to be perfect.

    Today it is still mechanically sound and ready for my next trip.

    However, as mentioned by others, tyres are looked after and pressures are dropped when on gravel or off road. I don't drive like a hooligan, and I take it relatively slow. I can cruse at around 110 on the open road, but I slow down quite drastically when on gravel or off road.

    If you look after it and treat it appropriately I don't see any issues.

    And finally, yes mine is still running 10" tyres and rims. I have been lucky and got a spare set a few years ago so the availability issue hasn't struck me yet, although this will most likely be the problem in coming months when I start looking for my 3rd set of tyres.

    And these small trailers tow very nicely behind a SJ or a Jimny.
    Nice pic. Gives me confidence to take mine on gravel roads.
    Sent from my iPhone


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