Retirement vehicle - Page 4




View Poll Results: Retirement vehicle for couple on farm

Voters
76. You may not vote on this poll
  • Mahindra TUV300

    4 5.26%
  • Honda BRV

    3 3.95%
  • Toyota Rush

    15 19.74%
  • Keep the Fortuner

    44 57.89%
  • I've suggested something else

    10 13.16%
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Results 61 to 72 of 72
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    Quote Originally Posted by toyopet View Post
    The new Toyota rush maybe as heavy on petrol as a Fortuner diesel as it has a big and heavy body. The Rush has 7 seats in the far east, and will probably get 7 seats here next year. I have retired in Jeffreys bay and almost all taxis are Avanzas and think the Rush may become a taxi vehicle and become prone to hijacking. The new Rush is based on the Ananza, only heavier
    I own a 2011 manual Fortuner 4x4 done 80k. I have knee and feet issues these days but would not want to change my fortuner. The most expensive service at the local dealer has been less than R2000.00. As for getting in and out there are strong grab handles for pulling yourself up and into the fortuner.
    My wife owns an Etios which is light on fuel but also a very light vehicle, and has a good ground clearance and may work for a gravel road. The only problem is the rattles you get for free.

    So, compared to the Avanza or Fortuner, how heavy is it? on fuel and the mass.

    I would really like to know how you got to this information, that you mention in your post
    Last edited by Hedgehog; 2018/07/09 at 09:43 AM.
    _______________________________________

    Dum vivimus, vivamus!
    LC76V8

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Jeffreys bay
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    New rush was released in Philipines Dec 2017.

    Avanza Rush Philipines specs
    length 4190mm 4435mm
    width 1660mm 1695mm
    weight 1094kg 1670kg
    I get 10 to 10.5 km/l on the fortuner with careful driving on open road.
    I see the new Rush has arrived at our local dealer will go check it out.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    5 people lots of luggage, then they should keep the TUna

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    Quote Originally Posted by toyopet View Post
    New rush was released in Philipines Dec 2017.

    Avanza Rush Philipines specs
    length 4190mm 4435mm
    width 1660mm 1695mm
    weight 1094kg 1670kg
    I get 10 to 10.5 km/l on the fortuner with careful driving on open road.
    I see the new Rush has arrived at our local dealer will go check it out.
    Here are the facts:

    http://www.toyota.co.za/ranges/rush#specifications

    The rush is just 120kg more than the Avenza

    I do find the gearing interesting though, and note the final drive ratio
    _______________________________________

    Dum vivimus, vivamus!
    LC76V8

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    Oudtshoorn
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    Red face Re: Retirement vehicle

    We retired 8 years ago. Paid up Xtrail (petrol) that now has only 70K on the clock (2005!). Excellent alround vehicle - trustworthy/reliable, low maintenance, 12-14 Km/Lt, space for the dogs. We also have a Prado. Only difference is ... fuel higher consumption & 4X4 ability. You will probably find that your road trips will become shorter and shorter - some "old toppies" do not like to travel as we get older.

    I agree with most of the above comments. Stay away from the Mahindra. Keep the Toyota for the same reasons we kept the Xtrail! Smaller vehicles are not always as safe and do not necessarily give you a better maintenance & fuel efficiency. And you will only use it for short trips anyway!

    Invest your money for the additional vehicle. You can always take the money invested and buy another vehicle if needed ... In the meantime you save a LOT of money and earn some interest.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Bellville
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    I agree with most here to say keep the Tuna, but as my wife has a BRV, I will give some info as asked for by OP. The BRV is powered by the super reliable 1.5 Honda motor that they stick into all their cars. I was concerned that as a people carrier, it wouldn't be able to cope, but how wrong I was! 88Kw is 6Kw more than my 90's Jetta CLi, and power is more than adequate. We have the 6 speed manual, and the cluthc is light, really light. Fuel consumption will be severely different to that of the Tuna, easily getting less than 7l/100km. Typically of all small sedans today, sound insulation isn't great, but it remain comfortable and easy to find a raised and relaxed seating position - leather seats is a must! Recently took it CPT - Lesotho and back, what a pleasure to travel distance and not feeling exhausted, but was missing my armrests! Seating for up to 6/7 people is great, but it looks like an MPV, no denying there, but it looks nicer than it predecessor. So far so good, gravel roads... It eats gravel for breakfast!! The full independent suspension does a fabulous job, a true gem. It glides over potholes and deals with sinkplaat without issue - those who know the Malgas road will have appreciation - I didn't try to hustle the vehicle, but driven normally, it honestly drives gravel better than my Pajero . From a cost perspective, it is good value, it is reliable, fuel efficient, excellent clearances, ample space, but no 4x4, and no traction control. On wet gravel/clay, this will likely be an issue. Also, agents are few and far between, and likely the deal breaker here. And lastly, the BRV services are only included for the first two years/30000kms, but can be extended.

    youtube clips

    Gen 2 2.8TDi, running with a Lexus heart since 290000kms
    - developed a drinking problem since - V8 inception 2014/03/28
    - looking up after some driver rehabilitation and fine tuning (5.5-8.7km/l) 2015/08/14
    - keep the wheels on the ground at all times - 2014/12/04
    - body maintenance completed -
    2015/02/19
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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  8. #67
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Witsand
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    Thanked: 39

    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    Unless the mileage is very high, keep the Fortuner. When and if you need to, trade it on another Toyota at that time. Stay away from the Mahindra.

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Pretoria
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    I don't know if all these comments are quite justified on the Mahindra. Do you know of any problems on the Mahindra TUV300? And I am not picking on only you Henris.is it just because it is an Indian car and therefore crap or do you and others have personal experience? As with some Chinese brands, I think the quality & finishing have improved considerably.I bought myself a TUV300 (exactly as shown on the picture in the first post). It has done about 31 000kms in 11 months with no problems. Very good ride quality. That 1.5 Mhawk turbo diesel give about 14kms/l on average (twice the mileage of my Cruiser). It is not a robot racer but the 230Nm of torque holds it's own in every day usage and mountainous areas (I travel a lot to KZN & back). Its got the exact same ladder frame chassis as the Scorpio4x4. It has almost the same width and height as a Fortuner, just considerably shorter. More legroom and headroom as the Scorpio4x4 and my Land Cruiser 76 for that matter (I am 2.05m tall). With a price of R230 000 and a service plan & warranty of 100000/3years there isn't anything THAT size that comes even close to the price. I also bought the Mahindra on recommendation of my brother-in-law and his experience with Mahindra who is a farmer and uses (read abuse) his Mahindra Pikup bakkie as a workhorse on the farm and to collect 80+ sheep with a trailer at least twice a month beyond Upington (1400km round trip)). He has done very high mileage on his Mahindra, despite also having a newish Hilux. He reckons if he abuses his Hilux like the Mahindra, the Hilux would depreciate more in value than the total price of the Mahindra. He is very happy with the Mahindra and had no issues with it. His neighbour owns a Land Cruiser bakkie but it stand mostly parked as he also bought him a Mahindra and uses it mostly for the better fuel economy. And I think that is why Mahindra is doing so well, according to their steady growth in the NAAMSA figures, mostly with farmers and small contractors, I presume. They even opened a plant in Durban this year to make Pikups and there are now apparently over 60 Mahindra dealers country wide. Believe it or not, I have read that they are the largest tractor manufacturer in the world and made the Willys Jeep under license as far back as 1947, so I don't think they make complete crap vehicles. Did I mention the price?When I bought the Mahindra last year in Hatfield, I also went to Honda, Renault & Ford to test the BR-V, Duster & Ecosport respectively. Well they are all very small in comparison with the TUV300 and all uni-bodybody styles and more car like and will not be as tough as the Mahindra with it's bakkie-like under pinning's. And the competitors are way more expensive. Of the competitors, I liked the Duster the most. Just worked better with my length. Like I said, the TUV compares more with the Fortuner in height & width, just almost HALF the price. a New TUV300 PLUS vehicle was recently launched in India with a 2.2 Mhawk diesel engine, 6 speed gearbox and much longer at the back with similar, although a bit smaller dimensions as the Fortuner. It is replacing the Xylo, so I am sure it will come to SA and according to comparative prices in India, it will be around R270 000 which is incredible to say the least.I am not saying that the OP should choose a Mahindra. If it is true that there is not a Mahindra dealer close by, I would also not go for a Mahindra. But to imply a Mahindra is crap, is a bit unfair. Did I mention the price...?
    Land Cruiser 76 S/W (Bloedhond VSK-Vrek Stadige Kar);
    Toyota Condor 4x4 3D; (Bloedhond SNMVSK-Selfs Nog Meer Vrek Stadiger Kar)
    Imagine Trailvan;
    BMW 1200 GS Adventure;
    "Life is too short to play golf"

  10. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Has left the building
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    Thanked: 2069

    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    Quote Originally Posted by Fritzie View Post
    I don't know if all these comments are quite justified on the Mahindra. Do you know of any problems on the Mahindra TUV300? And I am not picking on only you Henris.is it just because it is an Indian car and therefore crap or do you and others have personal experience? As with some Chinese brands, I think the quality & finishing have improved considerably.I bought myself a TUV300 (exactly as shown on the picture in the first post). It has done about 31 000kms in 11 months with no problems. Very good ride quality. That 1.5 Mhawk turbo diesel give about 14kms/l on average (twice the mileage of my Cruiser). It is not a robot racer but the 230Nm of torque holds it's own in every day usage and mountainous areas (I travel a lot to KZN & back). Its got the exact same ladder frame chassis as the Scorpio4x4. It has almost the same width and height as a Fortuner, just considerably shorter. More legroom and headroom as the Scorpio4x4 and my Land Cruiser 76 for that matter (I am 2.05m tall). With a price of R230 000 and a service plan & warranty of 100000/3years there isn't anything THAT size that comes even close to the price. I also bought the Mahindra on recommendation of my brother-in-law and his experience with Mahindra who is a farmer and uses (read abuse) his Mahindra Pikup bakkie as a workhorse on the farm and to collect 80+ sheep with a trailer at least twice a month beyond Upington (1400km round trip)). He has done very high mileage on his Mahindra, despite also having a newish Hilux. He reckons if he abuses his Hilux like the Mahindra, the Hilux would depreciate more in value than the total price of the Mahindra. He is very happy with the Mahindra and had no issues with it. His neighbour owns a Land Cruiser bakkie but it stand mostly parked as he also bought him a Mahindra and uses it mostly for the better fuel economy. And I think that is why Mahindra is doing so well, according to their steady growth in the NAAMSA figures, mostly with farmers and small contractors, I presume. They even opened a plant in Durban this year to make Pikups and there are now apparently over 60 Mahindra dealers country wide. Believe it or not, I have read that they are the largest tractor manufacturer in the world and made the Willys Jeep under license as far back as 1947, so I don't think they make complete crap vehicles. Did I mention the price?When I bought the Mahindra last year in Hatfield, I also went to Honda, Renault & Ford to test the BR-V, Duster & Ecosport respectively. Well they are all very small in comparison with the TUV300 and all uni-bodybody styles and more car like and will not be as tough as the Mahindra with it's bakkie-like under pinning's. And the competitors are way more expensive. Of the competitors, I liked the Duster the most. Just worked better with my length. Like I said, the TUV compares more with the Fortuner in height & width, just almost HALF the price. a New TUV300 PLUS vehicle was recently launched in India with a 2.2 Mhawk diesel engine, 6 speed gearbox and much longer at the back with similar, although a bit smaller dimensions as the Fortuner. It is replacing the Xylo, so I am sure it will come to SA and according to comparative prices in India, it will be around R270 000 which is incredible to say the least.I am not saying that the OP should choose a Mahindra. If it is true that there is not a Mahindra dealer close by, I would also not go for a Mahindra. But to imply a Mahindra is crap, is a bit unfair. Did I mention the price...?
    My litmus test is this:

    If everyone saying a particular vehicle is crap yet theyíve never owned one, and everyone who has owned one says itís not bad, thereís a good chance itís a decent vehicle. Much like a Prius.

    Iíve never owned a Mahindra, but a family who owns them and they are all getting excellent reliable service out of their vehicles.
    Just because we differ does not make either one of us wrong.

    I like most things with wheels...


  11. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    My parents bought a X-Trail when they retired in 2011 (the previous square shaped ones). They travel a 30km really bad gravel road twice a week. The car has 130000 km and has given them no issues whatsoever. I am amazed that it has not showed any signs of rattles, wear and tear or any issues as a result of the regular gravel road travel.

    My FIL has a 2016 (new shape) model 4x4 X-trail with all the bells and whistles. He is also very happy.

    Having said that, both of these cars become tight when you want to squeeze in 5 people and luggage. My FIL recently added Thule loadbars.
    Last edited by Groenman; 2018/07/18 at 03:59 PM.
    Stephan
    "All of us get lost in the darkness. Dreamers learn to steer by the stars"

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  13. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Germiston
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    Hi Johan,

    Have you considered a Suzuki Grand Vitara?

  14. #72
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Default Re: Retirement vehicle

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Philip View Post
    Hi Johan,

    Have you considered a Suzuki Grand Vitara?
    Thanks. Brilliant vehicle and dependable like the sun. Yes, but the fuel consumption for the auto GV is a bit much for them, coming from a 12km/l Fortuner.

    Also agents far away, but not the major reason. Just too heavy on fuel.
    Just because we differ does not make either one of us wrong.

    I like most things with wheels...


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