Renting vs Buying




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  1. #1
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    Default Renting vs Buying

    Hi everyone!

    As someone potentially getting into 4x4'ing specifically for camping and safari I would imagine renting would be the best option in the interim.

    Was looking at Bushtrackers to hire a 4x4 single cab two sleeper and heading somewhere close to Jhb to cut my teeth on camping.

    Any newbie mistakes I should avoid or things I should be aware of?

    Thanks!!

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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Hi

    What do you drive at the moment?

    How long are you planning to camp your first time?
    Mitsubishi Triton 3.2 DI-D 4x4
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Audi Q5 TDi.... first outing would be just a week.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    My 2c would be to hire a camper trailer and take it to Dinokeng, from there you can look at your experience decide going forward
    Lusted for a Landy but the Pajero was sexier and bigger in the right departments, just like my Missus.

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    Default Renting vs Buying

    I second the rent first proposal, but do a few trips with a variety of trailers/ caravans to decide what works best for your setup. Not everyone likes getting up into a trailer top tent.
    Others prefer the setup.
    Enjoy the process, you do not need everything on trip1, add as and when you really need stuff.
    Last edited by Flipside; 2018/06/08 at 01:21 PM.
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    another vote for the rent first option ....


    There is no such thing as the "perfect" setup ...


    Different kits work better for different types of trips, ie long trip with over-night stops in different places (now you really want a quick pitch solution) vs a few days in a camp (now you can take some time to pitch a larger rig that offers more ....

    how many people in your group ?

    sleeping arrangements ?

    weekend trips, or a more than a week at a time ?



    YOUR best rig will differ from the next guy. Best to figure out what works for you before buying ....

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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    I would say simplicity is key. Bigger is not always better. Think about your needs and then rent something for a trialrun weekend. Then you have a base to work from. I see a lot of newbie campers most enjoy the experience more so those with an open mind.

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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Do NOT go to camping shop until after your first few outings..you will end up with 50 kg of things you don't need
    There is no task too simple for some people to complicate !



    Chev Aveo and Atos and Polo.

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  10. #9
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    I've been through the lot, from RTTs, to ground tents to trailers. They each are best for different types of camping. I now run RTTs and a trailer, depending on my destination, how long I am staying and how many of us are going. Sometimes I take the trailer AND the RTTs.

    For long stays, trailers are best.
    For a tour with just one night stops, RTTs are best
    For going into difficult to tow areas where you plan to stay longer and you have the packing space, ground tents and stretchers are probably the answer,

    All the above are also dependent at how many people you have in your party and the space available in your vehicle.

    BUT ABOVE ALL:
    Rent first and do so for al least 4 or 5 trips before making up your mind on what your would like to buy.
    Last edited by mvcoller; 2018/06/11 at 02:00 PM.
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  12. #10
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Talking from experience my first bit of advice to you will be Less Is More!

    You do not need all the paraphernalia the camping shops want to make you believe is essential. If I were allowed to take only one piece of equipment apart from the sleeping stuff and eating equipment it will be a flat bottom cast iron pot. In there one can boil water, cook a breakfast, (upside down the lid serves as a frying pan as well), cook a complete meal, bake a bread and use it to wash the dishes in.
    *
    When you are dead, you don't know that you are dead. It is difficult only for the others.

    It is the same when you are stupid.

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  14. #11
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Rent first. Whatever you rent will be kitted out for 4x4 camping and you will learn the basis and what is important. Most of these providers are experienced and know what is required. Take your time and learn from the wealth of experience on this forum.
    Thanks/Groete

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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    We also started with renting first which gave us (actually SWAMBO) a good idea of what she wanted - the only mistake I made was to first rent a Jurgens Exclusive and only then the off-road caravans (Echo Kavango, Jurgens Xplorer).

    We then ended up with the Exclusive which is not bad but obviously not what I envisaged - but at least we do camp which I don't think we would have done if we got something else.

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  16. #13
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Renting works well. Go for the trailer/caravan option for normal camping trips and for the 4x4 vehicle when doing an overland trip to namibia or botswana ..

  17. #14
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Thank you gents this has been super helpful!!

    I think camping trailer is the answer for now.

    It's just my 6 year old daughter and I - hopefully my dad comes along too. He's got a couple of 4x4s which we could use.
    We plan to go for only 3 or 4 nights. My daughter is so flipping excited, but I'm not quite sure she knows what she's in for... ### cold at the moment too.

    A newbie question.. are there any reserves where you can put up camp wherever you like?

  18. #15
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Quote Originally Posted by chopper_jr View Post

    A newbie question.. are there any reserves where you can put up camp wherever you like?
    No.

    You have to camp at a proper campsite.

    Much safer too, and also generally with some kind of bathroom.

  19. #16
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    Totally agree - rent first.

    Don't be in a hurry to buy, learn from other peoples mistakes. this forum is fantastic for advice.

    Go camping with others.

    A tight budget can help, as you have to choose gear wisely. and buy once.


    • Remember the bigger the box, the more you will carry.




    • The more you carry, the heavier it is and more complicated with packing and unpacking.




    • The heavier it is, the more you and your vehicle battle. and you need a bigger vehicle.



    Some 4x4 trailers are so dam heavy, even before you put food, drinks, etc, inside.


    A lot of what people carry is not really needed. And then you need to store the gear when not using.

    Simplicity is the key. i.e. a flat bottomed cast iron pot is amazing what can be done with it. Even the lid replaces the skottle. (it's heavy but has so, so many uses.)

    As said, if you go to a camping shop or show, you will end up with stuff you don't need. Nice to have, but....

    Secret to happy camping - keep warm, comfortable and dry, or you have a miserable trip. and cold beers & fresh food, etc.

    It takes years to get it right, camping is very, very easy to over complicate.

    I have camped and travelled a lot. Done many 6 week to a few months trips to bots, zim, nam, Transkei, etc, etc. And then I went camping on the bike with my wife. It is absolutely amazing what you can leave behind and still be comfortable.

    Far too many nice to have gadgets and stuff in the camping stores today.

    Start camping close to home and do short trips.

    Every trip is different, so you need to adapt what you take, depending on the season and where you are going. camping at rocky bay in summer is totally different to camping in the berg in winter.

    They say if you don't use it on a trip dump it, don't take it again. but be very careful, just because it did not rain on this trip - don't dump your rain gear.


    For me a simple cleverly stocked camp trailer is the way to go. Keep it simple. Then you will enjoy your trips more. I still use my camping trailer build in 1987. Those days everybody laughed at us, a trailer in the bush traveling through the sand in bots and to top it, we had a freezer in the trailer, they stopped laughing when we pulled out the frozen steak and cold beers, simple but it all still works.

    Rent first, if you enjoy camping and plan to camp often, start collecting your equipment asap.
    Current off-road vehicles: *** Greatfamily accommodation.. see facebook and airbnb.. Mkulu Kei /Wild Wind Ranch
    * 1978 Land-Cruiser HJ40 DIESEL P/U "SHREK", BFG 31x10.5 muds.
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    * 2014 Land-Cruiser LX V8 76 DIESEL STATION WAGON, BFG's 285 all terrain. I have a spare 5000 warn winch I might fit.
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    ^^1999 TOYOTA 4x4 HILUX 2700i D/C, SOLD TO MY SON.



  20. #17
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    I think you first need to split the ideas of camping and 4x4ing into 2 completely separate ideas. They are each expensive on their own and together pricing becomes ridiculous.
    We started of camping in a citi golf and in a sports car and later a 2wd high-rise vehicle. Only the last 8 years do we have a 4x4, but not intended for camping, but doing trails and overlanding.

    I would say 90% of campsites are easily accessible by a normal car.
    5% you just need a high-rise vehicle
    Less than 5% actually needs a 4x4 to reach e.g. Kgalagadi or Mozambique.

    I would have loved an Audi SUV to go camping when I was younger.
    Keeping a 4x4 bakkie just for camping, I think is a waste of money. Being use to the Audi, I think a bakkie will become uncomfortable very soon as well.

    Touching on trailers early, but their is a view on this forum, that if you do not use a camping trailer more than 3days a month, every month of the year, after installments, maintenance, insurance and storage, it is just cheaper to rent. I say the same maths holds for the vehicle itself.
    PS - Do a 4x4 course. Well worth it if you did not grow up with offroading.
    That is just my 2c on that.

    Camping:
    There is just 2 things of importance:
    You want to sleep warm, comfortable and dry.
    You want to eat well.

    You tent is your home away from home. It is not there to protect you on warm, starry nights, but when the weather turns. Stuff like thunder showers and/or high winds. And I promise you, it will happen.
    Too give you an idea, the only times I have been stuck in mud, was in Decembers in the Cape. So much for being the warm, dry season.
    Tents in SA often sucks. For some reason the shops think the Saffies only camp in summer.

    I have seen tents, when you open the doorway, half the floor inside is exposed to rain.
    Most tents have so much mesh, it is difficult to keep warm inside.
    Only geodesic (dome) designs stands up to heavy wind.
    Those easy-up tents look good on a nice day, but I do not know how those hinges will survive a good wind.

    Buy at least double the amount of people you plan to fit. I.e. a 4-man if only you and your daughter. With the extra space, life is just easier and on days you are stuck inside waiting for weather to pass, you each want some of your own space.
    For many years, swambo and I camped in a R300 PnP 3-man tent. My only criticism is the amount of mesh. Otherwise it survived heavy thunder storms and crazy winds. When we planned to start a family, I ended up ordering a 4-season 6-man tents from the States.

    There is a place for RTTs, but they are small and cramped and expensive.
    A good nylon tent is a strong as canvas, but much lighter, easier to erect and cheaper.
    A trailer with RTT is popular, but yet again cramped if you do not have the outside tents. Also expensive
    Ideal would be an offroad caravan. They usually have a nice big tented area as well. Even more expensive, but worthwhile to consider renting.

    Mattresses is an infamous camping problem.
    Sponge is prob the best answer, but near impossible to pack.
    Air mattresses are comfortable, but they WILL leak. They are also very cold. We always have a blanket to wrap the blow-up mattress in. When camping in winter, we always camp at sites with electricity and take the electric blankets with.
    Stretchers work for some. They are expensive, bulky, badly insulated and can poke holes in your tent floor. I also havent seen one that will work for couples.

    We usually just take the duvets and fleece blankets from home. No bother with sleeping bags. Something that also has gone from a few hundred rand to a few thousand.

    We have 2 big plastic boxes we use for camping. Each is the size of a big cooler box. They always stay packed and on a shelf in the garage.
    One is the bedroom box. It has stuff like the blow-up mattresses and pumps, torches, gas fittings, electrical wires, spare toiler paper, etc in.

    The other box is the kitchen box.
    It contains the gas kettle, coffee, teas, rusks, clothes, paper plates and holders, cups, bowls, serviettes, paper towels, tin foil, rusks, dried fruit, etc.
    We also a a smaller tupperware in there, about quarter the size of the big box. All the cutlery is in there, e.g. cutlery, steak knives, peelers, cutting board, bread knife, serving spoons, spatulas, graters, etc.
    Most our cutlery is retired items from our kitchen at home.

    I admit, we have to much junk in their over the decades, but the plastic box is the packing limit. What doesnt fit, becomes obsolete.
    I have to say, it isnt the 4 day trips that gathers junk, It is the 2 week trips. Like after a week, you decide tonight we want carrot salad and of you go to the bush shop to find a grater. (Did find a nice flat set that packs nicely.) Similar story with our plastic bowls...

    We always take our 3kg cadac gas. Life is just easier with gas. For light, for morning coffee, bedtime tea for swambo-lite, warming up leftovers inside the tent in the cast-iron skillet during a thunder storm, making breakfast at a beach, etc.

    A good cooler box is worth its weight in gold. We have an average, 4-day cooler box and it will keep things cold for 3 days in summer.
    I did look at the 7-day cooler boxes, but packing space was less and very expensive. I ended up buying a gas/electric freezer for less.
    Now, fridges is another nasty kettle of fish. This forum has an entire section devoted to fridges and how to keep them running in the bush. Getting a modern fridge and getting it to operate more than 3 days in the bush is another R30k expense.

    For many years, swambo and I would buy 1 or 2 extra pieces of kit before every camping trip. It also spread the expenses over many years. Nowadays, we still go visit the camping shops, but mostly walk out without anything. There is very little left between all the gimmicks to greatly improve our camping experience. (Our plastic boxes are also full)

    We have been camping with swambo-lite since she was 4 months old. She is now 6 as well. She absolutely love it and is now the first to complain if we havent gone camping for a while.
    Last edited by RogueFrontier; 2018/06/21 at 03:46 PM.
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  22. #18
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    agree with RogueFrontier

    "Touching on trailers early, but their is a view on this forum, that if you do not use a camping trailer more than 3days a month, every month of the year," totally agree; a dedicated camping trailer to use for a few days a year is not worth it. A general purpose trailer is perfect, but rent that first, if required. What fits in the boot is enough for a weekend.

    My wife and I camped for many years with a beach buggy. and recently we camped two up with a bike, not so easy when you always camped in comfort, our first hiking tent still works. Start small, but buy everything right the first time.

    "Mattresses is an infamous camping problem. (totally agree) Sponge is probably the best answer, but near impossible to pack." My trailer is the same size as a mattress, our mattresses are packed inside the trailer on top, tightly to prevent stuff bouncing, works brilliantly.

    Tent size agree. Buy once and get a bigger one. for me a dome is perfect, as the kids get bigger get a second done tent. Not a RTT fan, we have not been eaten yet. my trailer opens in such away that the complete lid becomes a big kitchen table, so a tent can't fit on the trailer.

    Stretchers agree. I can't find one that works. Foam mattress on the floor, with foam mats under it, works the best. We bought a blow up but we have still not used it.

    fridges and freezes. My 1986 60Lts 3 way freezer still works, it just will not die!! I have looked again and again at the modern ones, as said 30k or more is what you need. I did add a spot for a future freezer in my cruiser draw system, so one day I will bite the bullet, but 30k is a lot of beer money and my beers are still cold.

    "A good cooler box is worth its weight in gold." Surprisingly some of the best boxes are the cheap ones. and unless you are going for weeks and into the bush, ice is normally available.

    The kitchen boxes. the ammo crates work for us.

    Start small, but buy everything right the first time.
    Current off-road vehicles: *** Greatfamily accommodation.. see facebook and airbnb.. Mkulu Kei /Wild Wind Ranch
    * 1978 Land-Cruiser HJ40 DIESEL P/U "SHREK", BFG 31x10.5 muds.
    * 1994 Land-Cruiser J70 DIESEL P/U, my truck recovery vehicle. 15000 warn winch. And 3.5ton hand winch. Back full of appropriate sized recovery gear. BFG31x10.5 muds.

    * 2014 Land-Cruiser LX V8 76 DIESEL STATION WAGON, BFG's 285 all terrain. I have a spare 5000 warn winch I might fit.
    * 1988 HILUX TOYOTA 4x4 D/C, BFG all terrain.
    * 2011 HILUX 4X4 P/U, BFG 31x10.5 all terrain.
    * 1999 PAJERO 3.5 V6 Mitsubishi (sorry not a Toyota), BFG 31x10.5 all terrain.
    * 4x4 trailer, 1987, BFG all terrain. *GSA 1200 BMW ADVENTURE [liquid cooled} 2018, the closest motorbike to a land cruiser. AMassey Fergusson 375 tractor. Not BFG's and not a 4x4.
    ^^1999 TOYOTA 4x4 HILUX 2700i D/C, SOLD TO MY SON.



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  24. #19
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    There's GOOD advice here!

    re-read it ALL.

    there's a couple of nice camping spots in the Cullinan area that are easy to get to and close enough for first timers.
    Merit before Race - anything else IS Racism.
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  25. #20
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    Default Re: Renting vs Buying

    As suggested - rent before you buy - there is many places in and around Pretoria that will suit your camping needs to "cut your teeth".

    Give the guys @ CampEzi Off-Road Trailer Rentals a buzz - various models of Off-Road Trailer available - you can arrange viewing / demo before-hand and they are on your way from Edenvale towards the resorts...

    www.campezi.co.za // https://www.facebook.com/campezi/?ref=br_rs

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