Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero? - Page 2




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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    The current extra high rates are an emergency measure for 150 days.

    That said, I doubt we will ever see the free water again ... let's not forget, the "low cost homes" still get their free 6m3 a month.



    BUT .... consider the following ..... population has doubled, dam volume has not increased (1 small dam does not count). We would need heavy rains year after year if we want to return to the previous norm of enough water for farming, industry and homes ....


    The reality is we WILL go to desalination sooner rather than later. Okay, we may follow the idiotic example of Hermanus - start five well points as an emergency, and keep pumping this water to wash cars with hose pipes and carry on without any water restrictions .... one day their well points will run dry ... and then

    So it may take a bit longer, but desalination appears to be the only long term answer - this COSTS MONEY .... expect water to be become VERY expensive, not as a 150 day measure, but as a long term thing ....


    Thus I have not spent one cent on drinking water for Day Zero, but I have spent a serious amount of money on paving, rain water and grey water systems - for LONG term water saving.

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  3. #22
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    R8k

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  5. #23
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nerd View Post
    My question is when will water drop to the "Normal" cost again. Will we ever have 6000 liters per month for free again?
    If this is due for change only in 2 or 3 years time, I will spend the money today to be mostly off-grid to ensure RoI is reach sooner rather than later.

    Nerd
    I doubt it will drop to those pricing structures again now they have us trained into low usage and higher costs. As mentioned elsewhere, we will probably end up with the equivalent of Level 3 pricing/usage restrictions so, if you have a pool or want a lush garden, you will either need to hoes for water or hoes for tanks.
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  6. #24
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    I've spend a fair amount mainly just to be able to keep my garden from completely dying out and the odd top up of a pool, and with day zero in mind. I bought a 2nd hand water trailer (2500L) for R28 500, but had to get it transported from Durban which cost another R8000 (still saved as new they are R55k upwards!). Bought a petrol water pump plus hoses and fittings which you can easily add another R8000, plus an electric water pump for the watering. Oh yes 2 flow bins and a Jojo. Probably in for around R50 000 thus far. At least I can sell most when not needed. I get my water from a dam, but with a filtration system could pump that into the house if we get to day zero. Costly excercise, but cheaper than a borehole which is not a guarantee.

    Have offered my services to the CoCt if they need water transported to those in need if we get to day zero.
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  7. #25
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    We have a 2500 tank and pump and filter to collect rainwater. It should get us off grid as long as it rains + 3 weeks so I do think we'll recover some of our investment in future. Anything more than that is going to start costing real money. In a real crisis, the back-up plan is to pump water from the swimming pool into the tank for showers and toilets. We can buy drinking water.

    We have space for a few flow bins on the other side of the house and it would be great to collect rain water to top up the pool in summer, but at nearly R2000 for a cheap, non-food grade flow bin, I just can't justify it. These things went for R700 each just 3 months ago.
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  8. #26
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nerd View Post
    We were on 250 liters per day municipal water since last year June. , so we should be below 200 liter per day at the moment. Problem is, it is becoming bloody expensive to use municipal water.

    My question is when will water drop to the "Normal" cost again.

    Nerd
    How much is bloody expensive? 250l a day is 7.5kl a month & 200l is 6kl.

    In Drakenstein 6kl was still free till last month and from this month on level 6b it will cost a whopping R4.66 per kl for the 1st 6 (thats < R28 for 6kl) and the next tranche is R14.60 per kl for 6-10.
    So 10 000 liters of the good stuff only cost about R86.50. Bloody cheap if you ask me, what do you guys pay in other areas?

    I'm off the water grid (not by choice, but there is no municipal option).When you have to fend for your own water it is much more expensive.
    People that live in town are now drilling boreholes and going off-grid at huge sums of money. Up to R100k for 100metres, then cost of tanks/filtration systems/pumps/additional plumbing, etc.
    Now the running cost of electricity & maintenance..
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  10. #27
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamakazi View Post
    How much is bloody expensive? 250l a day is 7.5kl a month & 200l is 6kl.

    In Drakenstein 6kl was still free till last month and from this month on level 6b it will cost a whopping R4.66 per kl for the 1st 6 (thats < R28 for 6kl) and the next tranche is R14.60 per kl for 6-10.
    So 10 000 liters of the good stuff only cost about R86.50. Bloody cheap if you ask me, what do you guys pay in other areas?

    I'm off the water grid (not by choice, but there is no municipal option).When you have to fend for your own water it is much more expensive.
    People that live in town are now drilling boreholes and going off-grid at huge sums of money. Up to R100k for 100metres, then cost of tanks/filtration systems/pumps/additional plumbing, etc.
    Now the running cost of electricity & maintenance..
    Many of those going "off-line" is paying R50k and up for the hardware, to the very obscene R2M a gent paid in the Southern suburbs.


    Then the operational costs kick in .... MUCH more expensive than municipal water !!!

    As an "emergency back-up" ... absolute overkill

    As a long term plan .... simply way too expensive ....



    Municipal water only becomes expensive to those that use obscene amounts of water.

  11. #28
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    I believe it's coming down in buckets at the moment
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  12. #29
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snyks View Post
    I believe it's coming down in buckets at the moment
    proper hail storm in Bellville.

    Hail the size of ice-cubes !!


    Had 5mm early in the afternoon, had another 5mm just now.


    more than a 1 000 liter captured in the last couple of days.

  13. #30
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisF View Post
    actually easy .... apparently

    Those with both rain water tanks and well points - direct the tank overflow back into the well point .... or so the experts say. Would love to know if it is that easy/practical
    Windhoek has been doing it for a few years . They put water back voa boreholes. The Omdel dam at Hentiesbay is does the same. The water runs from the dam into borehole drill down stream. Henties then pumps it out again through other boreholes and use it as drinking water. Isreal has been doing it for a long time. Windhoel also recyclea sewerage water for drinking purposes and semi purified water to irrigate municipal gardens and sports fields. This has been done since the sixties in Windhoek.

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  15. #31
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisF View Post
    Many of those going "off-line" is paying R50k and up for the hardware, to the very obscene R2M a gent paid in the Southern suburbs.

    Then the operational costs kick in .... MUCH more expensive than municipal water !!!

    As an "emergency back-up" ... absolute overkill

    As a long term plan .... simply way too expensive ....

    Municipal water only becomes expensive to those that use obscene amounts of water.
    Our municipal water is very cheap. How many pay more than R300pm for household water only? Electricity is more expensive. You even pay more to stay online so that you can read posts on this forum, do your banking etc.

    You can do without internet (sort of ) and cope without electricity, at least most of our forum members. But not without water. The infrastructure to become independent seems high when compared to the what we pay for water. We don't blink twice spending this on a solar system.

    Spending R10k for 10kl tanks, R5k for a pressure pump and filters, and another R5k for piping etc is not an overkill IMHO to try and be "partially off the grid" by utilising rain water and becoming semi independent of municipality water. Spend twice this and you should be able to be totally independent. Not bad for R40k. This is on par than the depreciation of your car as you drive out of the show room.


  16. #32
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeml View Post
    Our municipal water is very cheap. How many pay more than R300pm for household water only? Electricity is more expensive. You even pay more to stay online so that you can read posts on this forum, do your banking etc.

    You can do without internet (sort of ) and cope without electricity, at least most of our forum members. But not without water. The infrastructure to become independent seems high when compared to the what we pay for water. We don't blink twice spending this on a solar system.

    Spending R10k for 10kl tanks, R5k for a pressure pump and filters, and another R5k for piping etc is not an overkill IMHO to try and be "partially off the grid" by utilising rain water and becoming semi independent of municipality water. Spend twice this and you should be able to be totally independent. Not bad for R40k. This is on par than the depreciation of your car as you drive out of the show room.
    YES, reasonably affordable to harvest rain water and to reduce your consumption. Using this for non-potable purposes is a very cheap way to save on municipal water


    Unfortunately NOT ... for the typical small townhouse roof .... simply not enough catchment area. And in a modern erf often not enough space for tanks to store water for the dry months.



    By all means, PLEASE get as many tanks as your roof and erf justifies. Get your pool of the municipal water. Get your garden off municipal water. And if you have spare water get your toilets off municipal water. Mid winter I will have another look at my rain harvesting and usage .... I may well spend a bit of money to use rain water to feed the washing machine when I have excess water


    For a reasonably low expense I have diverted our bath, shower and washing machine water to a grey water system that feeds our toilets. Add a blue block in the cistern and guests dont even know it is not municipal water in the toilet.



    So though many cant get "off the grid", it is very possible and even affordable for most to make dramatic savings in their water usage.


    The bit of rain we have had on Friday and today added about 1 000 liters into my tanks. That is 1 000 liter I dont have to get from the municipality for my pool and garden.

  17. #33
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    We will also probably be in the same scenario in a few years time, ie small roof, and possibly complex restrictions re tanks etc. Camouflaged tanks, disguised as flower beds etc will become quite popular.

    Difficult to go "off grid" in town houses, and impossible in flats.


  18. #34
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    I haven't spent a cent. Not planning to either. When (if) day zero comes I don't want to be anywhere near the inevitable mayhem in the streets, so my plan is to simply leave.

    Long term the plan is the same. I'm not going to live in a desert served by an incompetent government/local authority.

    This is just another brick in the wall.
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  19. #35
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    My preparation isn't specifically for day zero, but rather in general to reuse as much as possible and use rain water optimally. Why use clean tap water for gardening while you dump hundreds of liters down the drain.

    Even if it rains miraculously for a month, we should brace ourselves for level 6 restrictions for at least a year, most probably two years.
    Last edited by George; 2018/02/14 at 11:48 AM.
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  20. #36
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    I believe municipal water is the cheapest.
    I believe Day Zero will prolly not come as it has become political (but I cannot afford to take chances).
    I believe [& have experienced] fluctuating (0 to 5bar) municipal water pressure.
    I have bought a 2500l water tank fed by municipal water thru a toilet cutoff valve, with a pressure pump downstream of the tank. This irons out presure fluctuations & gives me a 2500l reserve.
    If day zero comes:
    I bought a 350l tank for the back of my bakkie, and two 25l fuel tanks which I use for water transport till the shortages are past then put fuel in them.
    I bought a Gardena drill-driven pump which I will use (via my rechargable drill) to pump water from that 350l tank (daily) to my 2500l storage tank (also prolly from the allocation-place into that 350l tank).
    Cost:
    2500l tank R2500
    Plumber R2200
    Elec motor & valves/fittings etc R2000
    Pressure switch R800
    Gardena drill-driven water-pump R 300
    Total cost <R9300
    Last edited by Mick; 2018/02/18 at 11:18 PM.
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  22. #37
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    I have extensive experience on rainwater collection and use for water supply in the house, because at the mouth of the Breede river where our family holiday house is, we have no water supply and are 100% reliant on rainwater collection. Water is collected in 6 x 5000 litre tanks and pumped into the house with a pump equipped with a pressure switch (at Breede that is). We have to take down water for drinking or boil the tank water.

    So, in Somerset West where I live, I have bought 4 x 5000 litre tanks (2 @ R4950 and 2 @ R5400; there was a price increase around December). I have had to wait 8 weeks for my first two tanks from my preferred supplier in Blackheath.

    I rerouted 5 downpipes from my gutters and stepped them down from the standard 80 mm to 50 mm, because in 50 mm you get standard 90 and 45 degree bends, and one gets a screw-less clip that simplifies installation (try installing 6 m lengths of 50 mm pipe that runs along a wall at a slight slope while standing on a ladder 3 m in the air on your own). The 50 mm pipe's capacity is way sufficient for even the heavy downpour we had last week.

    The tanks are located in two different places and therefore required long outflow 40 mm connections to be able to supply the bottom tank from the three top tanks. The pressure pump was about R950 (a 40 litres per minute @ 4bar capacity pump should be adequate for most requirements) and the pressure switch was R666 at an irrigation supplier in Sir Lowry's pass. The outflow from my bottom tank is pumped into my house connection via a new T and two ball valves, one to cut off municipal supply and the other to open the tank side.

    My plumbing and rainwater diversion costs amounted to about R7000 (doing all myself).

    So for R28 000 we now have 20 000 litres capacity, and we managed to collect 15 000 litres of rainwater since October 2017. With the recent February thunderstorm we received 16 mm of rain (measured at a friends house nearby) and our rainwater system collected 2700 litres of water during that storm.

    I think that Day Zero is now pushed forward so far into the normal wet season, that it probably would not happen. But we are not out of the woods yet in CT. I read an article that we should "state proof" our businesses and our lives and this is my attempt to state proof my water supply to some extent.

    In winter we can go completely off the grid and go back to taking standard showers, as well as stop flushing our toilets with the smelly grey water that we collect in buckets in the shower. In winter we can never use all the rainwater that we will collect in the tanks, even in a very dry year. In summer the tanks will not carry us through, but can assist in keeping our municipal water consumption down.

    At the current Level 6b tariffs, if you use 10 kl/month like we used to do during most of 2017, you will pay over a R1000 for water and another R950 for sewerage, totaling almost R2000 per month. You could save substantially by staying near the required 6kl/month from the grid.
    Last edited by Blitsbreker; 2018/02/19 at 08:51 AM.

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  24. #38
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Can that gardena drill pump be used to pump grey water ?

  25. #39
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    I seriously doubt it. My .75 kWh pump required more than 2 hours to pump 2000 liters through two hosepipes (connected in series) while combating a static head of only 3.5 m. Obviously there is massive head loss along the length of two hosepipes, but still...

  26. #40
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    Default Re: Cape Townians - How much have you spend to combat Day Zero?

    Quote Originally Posted by Blitsbreker View Post
    I seriously doubt it. My .75 kWh pump required more than 2 hours to pump 2000 liters through two hosepipes (connected in series) while combating a static head of only 3.5 m. Obviously there is massive head loss along the length of two hosepipes, but still...
    Using a 15mm standard hose pipe from the tank to gravity feed it is SLOW ....Do the same with a 22mm pipe and you will SEE the effect of friction in these small pipes ....


    Rather invest in some 25mm black pipe if you want to pump large volumes of water. The pump wont work as hard, and the job will be done a LOT quicker.

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