2020 East Africa Trip Preparations




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  1. #1
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    Default 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Hi Guys,

    I have a sabatical in the year 2020, which entitles me to 12 months continious leave. In my profession I am afforded a sabatical for every 6 years of service. I intend to spend at least 4 of those 12 months on a mother of a safari trip. This has been a dream since high-school, so I am going to try my best. I cannot say exactly when I am going to start in that year at this point, so it may or may not be in parts of the rainy season of Eastern-Africa.

    I intend to drive the entire East African circuit including Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Kenya (depending on safety and stability at the time), Uganda and Mozambique. I intend to enter via Namibia, then Botswana, then Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda and an exit route ultimately via Mozambique. I would have loved to view the DRC as well, but I simply don't have the overlanding experience to travel into DRC by myself. If someone has experience with DRC kindly share please. With this I mean predominantly safety, as one hears negative remarks about it. The entire trip will be solo. Hence the pro-active nature of my inquiry, as I believe that 24 - 30 months are already cutting it close ito planning. I am not going to travel by strict calendar as I have no real time constraint. Even if the trip ticks over with a month or two, it's fine. I want to enter and leave as I feel. If I really enjoy someplace, I'd like to stay longer and vice versa.

    Now for the practical side to things:

    My current vehicle will probably not suffice, as by that time the mileage and age will be moving on. By 2020, my diesel Patrol will already be 8 years old and close to 150 000 kilometers. Currently it has 110 000, so in 30 months it should be close to 150 000. Being a turbo diesel, I feel uneasy about the trip in an older vehicle, as mechanical issues and dramas to the solo traveler in this trip would spell nightmare and disaster. Until now it has been very reliable, but I feel uneasy about such a far reaching remote trip at an advanced age.

    So, I am going to buy a new overlander. I want to buy it cash, no bank finance. It will not be brand new out of the box. It will be secondhand. My first choice is Toyota 76 LC SW. Only the 4.2D (I simply do not have the money to buy a V8, and I'm not sure how well they do with contaminated diesel/ impurities). I am struggling to find a 4.2 with fewer than 140 000 km at this stage, but I am keeping a strong lookout. I would prefer the 4.2 as it is low tech and the 4.2 can burn not only 500ppm diesel, but contaminated diesel that is mixed with other impurities. Once again, these vehicles seem to be very scarce in the 4.2 at reasonable mileage and remain pricey!

    Second option, a 4.8L petrol Patrol. Does anyone have long-distance overlanding experience with these vehicles? I am NOT biased towards this vehicle. It looks attractive because they are extremely affordable secondhand with very low mileage. I have noticed these 4.8's on a number of occasions with less than 60 000 km on the clock for really good prices. In December I saw a 4.8 with 50 000 km on the clock (2010 model) for sale for R 340 000. It seems very reasonable. I have partaken in various discussions, and there have been many, on the 4.8 vs 76. I have read the parts issue in detail and I understand that Toyota has the far greater reach ito parts. However, if it is a vehicle with low low mileage, say 40 000 km or less (this is what I am patiently looking for), I doubt whether parts will be that much of an issue, seeing that the vehicle is almost new. Any experience in Africa with these vehicles? It is probable that the vehicle will have to be serviced in the middle of the trip, probably Tanzania. If I have to choose between a 4.2 Toyota with 150 000 km or more versus a 4.8 with 50 000 km or less, I think the smart choice would be the 4.8? Any thoughts? How sensitive is this aspirated engine to contaminated petrol? If it should be the patrol I will ad a third 100L fuel tank to the existing 135L capacity. Are there any electronics that can go bonkers? This will be my overlander from purchase onward, which means it will spend lots of time in the my garage and only be used for holidays. It is not a multipurpose daily driver. I know it is notoriously heavy on juice, but let's be honest, the 4.2 isn't that economical itself. My colleague has a 2012 4.2 that does not do better than 6km/l (according to him, not me), and if that is true, surely the patrol with its 4 - 5 km/l isn't that much worse off? Am I missing something important here? I am taking into account that fuel expenses are going to be severe and will have to be budgeted for generously.

    The vehicle will be kitted accordingly and prepared ito self-sufficiency. I will do this trip on my own, just one person, so I will utilize the roof top tent only. I don't intend pulling a trailer.

    Could those whom have done similar trips please advise on malaria treatments? I will definitely take medication and I will definitely consult a travel doctor before embarking closer to the time (I would be insane if I don't), but for interest sake: if malaria is contracted whilst on the road, which emergency medicine is usually applied in order to avert disaster? Has anyone ever contracted the disease on the road and how did you cope if so? Once gain, I will properly prepare and I will consult a medical doctor, I am just asking in the meantime.


    In terms of harassment by officials / police and traffic officers, how prevalent did you experience it? I understand that it is part of Africa overlanding, but it has always been my Achilles heel in dealing with them. I suppose a mindset change is urgently required. How do you cope with traffic officials / police demanding bribes / extorting you for cash?

    In terms of cash on hand. Namibia and Bots would mostly accommodate credit cards (in some places), but I assume that it becomes very unlikely from further north-east?

    In terms of overlanding experience by car, I have not been north of Zambia before. So, this is a big step, and I am planning well ahead therefore. There are loads to prepare, and if I may I'll add to this thread as I go along. Places, accommodation, vital foods, medicine , insurance etc. But I think preparing the car and kitting it out for now will be the most important and the most costly. It is the first step, logically.

    Any thoughts, at this premature time, would be appreciated.
    Last edited by Van Halen; 2018/02/10 at 09:27 PM.
    Johann

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preperations

    Hats off to you for doing this solo! I also want to do this kind of trip, maybe up to Ethiopia, but that will probably only happen in 2022. Following this thread with interest. Good luck with all the planning!

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  5. #3
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preperations

    Thanks Tolbos. I figured that life is short, good health not a gaurentee for ever, and memories are better than earthly posessions. So...
    Johann

    2013 Nissan Patrol GU

    OL Steel Bumper
    Tough Dog Heavy Duty Suspension
    TJM Airtek Snorkel
    VRS 12500lbs Winch
    Fronrunner Roofrack
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    Dual Battery + Inverter
    LightForce Spots + Lightbars
    BushBaby Boswa with Howling Moon Rooftop Tent

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  7. #4
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Johann

    That is a great trip you are planning, and I commend you for starting the planning early. There are a number of people on this forum who have done what you plan on doing. In particular, I point you towards your fellow South African, Stan Weakley, who drove up to Sudan in 2015/2016. His Slow Donkey blog is, as befits a retired surgeon, meticulous in its detail. I think it is currently offline, but he has posted PDFs of the Word documents of the blog posts on the forum. I am sure he will reply to your thread.

    We too have done what you are planning, but we drove from the UK to the Cape (and back to Kenya) between August 2013 and December 2014. We were away for 18 months and on the road for 14 months. We drive a Land Rover Defender. I too have posted our blog posts on this forum in each country section. Whilst old blogs are useful for planning and seeing the art of the possible, one must remember that bureaucratic procedures can change. The places on the whole don’t.

    Apropos your comment about possible instability in Kenya, being Kenya born and bred, this is not something to worry about. Your own country seems to be not exactly a leading light in Africa at the moment!

    There is absolutely nothing to worry about doing it solo. We did even through some tough remote sections such as down Lake Turkana (when we didn’t see another vehicle for two and a half days) and through Kakaoland in northern Namibia.

    You are right that prior planning is the key to a successful overland trip. We talked about our “mother of all safaris” for 20 years, were in deep planning for five years, and went on trial trips. We also posted a post-trip report on our UK-Cape-Kenya adventure on this forum in January 2015. A search will bring this up.

    Good luck with the planning.

  8. #5
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Halen View Post
    Hi Guys,

    I have a sabatical in the year 2020, which entitles me to 12 months continious leave. In my profession I am afforded a sabatical for every 6 years of service. I intend to spend at least 4 of those 12 months on a mother of a safari trip. This has been a dream since high-school, so I am going to try my best. I cannot say exactly when I am going to start in that year at this point, so it may or may not be in parts of the rainy season of Eastern-Africa.

    I intend to drive the entire East African circuit including Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Kenya (depending on safety and stability at the time), Uganda and Mozambique. I intend to enter via Namibia, then Botswana, then Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda and an exit route ultimately via Mozambique. I would have loved to view the DRC as well, but I simply don't have the overlanding experience to travel into DRC by myself. If someone has experience with DRC kindly share please. With this I mean predominantly safety, as one hears negative remarks about it. The entire trip will be solo. Hence the pro-active nature of my inquiry, as I believe that 24 - 30 months are already cutting it close ito planning. I am not going to travel by strict calendar as I have no real time constraint. Even if the trip ticks over with a month or two, it's fine. I want to enter and leave as I feel. If I really enjoy someplace, I'd like to stay longer and vice versa.

    Now for the practical side to things:

    My current vehicle will probably not suffice, as by that time the mileage and age will be moving on. By 2020, my diesel Patrol will already be 8 years old and close to 150 000 kilometers. Currently it has 110 000, so in 30 months it should be close to 150 000. Being a turbo diesel, I feel uneasy about the trip in an older vehicle, as mechanical issues and dramas to the solo traveler in this trip would spell nightmare and disaster. Until now it has been very reliable, but I feel uneasy about such a far reaching remote trip at an advanced age.

    So, I am going to buy a new overlander. I want to buy it cash, no bank finance. It will not be brand new out of the box. It will be secondhand. My first choice is Toyota 76 LC SW. Only the 4.2D (I simply do not have the money to buy a V8, and I'm not sure how well they do with contaminated diesel/ impurities). I am struggling to find a 4.2 with fewer than 140 000 km at this stage, but I am keeping a strong lookout. I would prefer the 4.2 as it is low tech and the 4.2 can burn not only 500ppm diesel, but contaminated diesel that is mixed with other impurities. Once again, these vehicles seem to be very scarce in the 4.2 at reasonable mileage and remain pricey!

    Second option, a 4.8L petrol Patrol. Does anyone have long-distance overlanding experience with these vehicles? I am NOT biased towards this vehicle. It looks attractive because they are extremely affordable secondhand with very low mileage. I have noticed these 4.8's on a number of occasions with less than 60 000 km on the clock for really good prices. In December I saw a 4.8 with 50 000 km on the clock (2010 model) for sale for R 340 000. It seems very reasonable. I have partaken in various discussions, and there have been many, on the 4.8 vs 76. I have read the parts issue in detail and I understand that Toyota has the far greater reach ito parts. However, if it is a vehicle with low low mileage, say 40 000 km or less (this is what I am patiently looking for), I doubt whether parts will be that much of an issue, seeing that the vehicle is almost new. Any experience in Africa with these vehicles? It is probable that the vehicle will have to be serviced in the middle of the trip, probably Tanzania. If I have to choose between a 4.2 Toyota with 150 000 km or more versus a 4.8 with 50 000 km or less, I think the smart choice would be the 4.8? Any thoughts? How sensitive is this aspirated engine to contaminated petrol? If it should be the patrol I will ad a third 100L fuel tank to the existing 135L capacity. Are there any electronics that can go bonkers? This will be my overlander from purchase onward, which means it will spend lots of time in the my garage and only be used for holidays. It is not a multipurpose daily driver. I know it is notoriously heavy on juice, but let's be honest, the 4.2 isn't that economical itself. My colleague has a 2012 4.2 that does not do better than 6km/l (according to him, not me), and if that is true, surely the patrol with its 4 - 5 km/l isn't that much worse off? Am I missing something important here? I am taking into account that fuel expenses are going to be severe and will have to be budgeted for generously.

    The vehicle will be kitted accordingly and prepared ito self-sufficiency. I will do this trip on my own, just one person, so I will utilize the roof top tent only. I don't intend pulling a trailer.

    Could those whom have done similar trips please advise on malaria treatments? I will definitely take medication and I will definitely consult a travel doctor before embarking closer to the time (I would be insane if I don't), but for interest sake: if malaria is contracted whilst on the road, which emergency medicine is usually applied in order to avert disaster? Has anyone ever contracted the disease on the road and how did you cope if so? Once gain, I will properly prepare and I will consult a medical doctor, I am just asking in the meantime.


    In terms of harassment by officials / police and traffic officers, how prevalent did you experience it? I understand that it is part of Africa overlanding, but it has always been my Achilles heel in dealing with them. I suppose a mindset change is urgently required. How do you cope with traffic officials / police demanding bribes / extorting you for cash?

    In terms of cash on hand. Namibia and Bots would mostly accommodate credit cards (in some places), but I assume that it becomes very unlikely from further north-east?

    In terms of overlanding experience by car, I have not been north of Zambia before. So, this is a big step, and I am planning well ahead therefore. There are loads to prepare, and if I may I'll add to this thread as I go along. Places, accommodation, vital foods, medicine , insurance etc. But I think preparing the car and kitting it out for now will be the most important and the most costly. It is the first step, logically.

    Any thoughts, at this premature time, would be appreciated.
    My thoughts:
    1) It is a great trip and do not worry about travelling solo. Also you might pick up some fellow traveller along the way. It happens.

    2)Why are you worried about a Patrol with 150K km? It's barely broken in. If you fancy another car that's up to you, but a 2013 with that low mileage is as good as new as far as I am concerned. There will be a queue here trying to buy it.

    Enjoy your preparations.

    Cheers

  9. #6
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    PS: Throughout 18 countries and 18 months, we were never asked for a bribe. We received nothing but kindness and courtesy from all officials and police. If we had done something wrong - like speeding - we paid the fine and got the relevant paperwork from the courteous police. It is well to remember that they are only doing their job.

    Stan will, no doubt, comment on malaria. It is very important to take prophylaxis and we took Malarone. There are also good hospitals in each country you intend visiting where you will be able to get treatment. Even the most remote bush clinic will have extensive experience of malaria, but if I were you, I would get myself to the nearest sophisticated hospital. In Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania these are the Aga Khan hospitals (or Nairobi Hospital). Taking out a subscription for the AMREF Flying Doctor is another good “insurance policy” for East Africa.

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  11. #7
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Thanks Guys. You are right, the Republic isn't exactly in tip-top shape. Hopefully the zuptafication process can be made undone. Let's wait and see.

    It is not that I want a new car, I just don't want to have the nightmare of mechanical (especially engine failure) problems. Having said that, the luxury of the zd30 motor is the fact that it can take 500ppm diesel. However, the vehicle will have to be thoroughly inspected. I will consult a mechanic with Patrol experience and consider changing the turbo and injectors as pro-active measures prior to the trip. Should I not buy a new car, obviously it reduces lots of financial expenses. But, then I want assurance that my current lorry will do the job. I want to relax and enjoy. Not stress about mechanical issues.

    Thanks for the thumbs up on Kenya. I would really love to explore the iconic African destination.

    Warm Regards

    Johann
    Johann

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  12. #8
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Hi Johann, sorry been away for weekend. You can do far worse than picking up all of Wazungu Wawili's posts from their East African trips. Much of my guidance prior to our trip came from her.

    My blog is down at present but I did post PDFs of our blog here http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

    That should keep you busy for a while. I am sure W.W. and myself (and others) will keep an eye on this thread so just post queries on this thread as they arise.

    Just as a first comment. You might as well include Rwanda and make your route Tanzania-Rwanda-Uganda-Kenya. Rwanda is a small country of exceptional beauty.
    Last edited by Stan Weakley; 2018/02/11 at 03:05 PM.
    Landcruiser 76SW.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    At least "Once a year go someplace you have never been before" Delai Lama.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Hi Stan,

    Thank you for the suggestion. I have been wondering how you guys cope with driving in the big African cities? Say, Dar Es Salaam for example. I've 'endured' it in dar Es Salaam in 2012 on the passenger seat of my crafty taxi driver. But good heavens, cudos to those driving there, you have nerves of titanium. I needed surgical alcohol in my drink after those rides to cool my nerves.

    As things develop, I'll let you guys know. Stan, may I ask your take on the vehicle choice? I am going ti check your blog, be assured.

    Thanks for the awesome info guys. I appreciate it.
    Johann

    2013 Nissan Patrol GU

    OL Steel Bumper
    Tough Dog Heavy Duty Suspension
    TJM Airtek Snorkel
    VRS 12500lbs Winch
    Fronrunner Roofrack
    EEZI Awn Rooftop Tent
    Dual Battery + Inverter
    LightForce Spots + Lightbars
    BushBaby Boswa with Howling Moon Rooftop Tent

  14. #10
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    We avoided the big cities as much as possible because of the traffic but when inevitable just relax and be patient. For the most part the new editions of Tracks4Africa on your GPS will guide you via the quickest urban routes. Also ask around and plan your routes well.

    My take is that the best vehicle for remote travel in Africa is any of the Land Cruiser 70 series vehicles with the 4,2l diesel engine, just as you propose.

    I am not interested in engaging in a debate about Patrol vs Land Rover vs Toyota. My argument is not about the capabilities of the various brands. The 70 series models be it the 76 series station wagon, long wheel base "Troopy" station wagon (78 series) or the pickup (79 series), are the workhorses of remote Africa. In that situation they vastly outnumber any other vehicle. This means that every bush or pavement mechanic knows how to work on them and spares can either be found or pirated second-hand even in the remotest areas. Also in the larger centers the authorized agents and workshops are busy and competent and there are more of them.

    I agree about the straight 6 (4,2l) diesel engine with its capabilities with contaminated fuel is to be favored above the V8. Any vehicle with a turbo, complex monitoring and other computer functions could turn into a nightmare.

    That said your Patrol at its relatively low mileage is also a very reliable vehicle and only you can decide whether the extra expense of selling it to buy a 76 series is worth while. The one warning I would give you is to avoid any suspension modifications and especially a lift as you may have difficulties in finding spares. Rather travel as light as you can and avoid overloading. The standard suspension is strong enough.
    Landcruiser 76SW.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    At least "Once a year go someplace you have never been before" Delai Lama.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

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  16. #11
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Thank you Mr Weakly,

    I am hoping to find a 4.2 straight 6 LC 76 SW. However, due to their discontnuence, they seem difficult to find. Those I could find, are heavily laden with mileage. I will keep on looking.

    I don't know why Toyota discontinued this engine.

    Thanks again

    Johann
    Johann

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    OL Steel Bumper
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    TJM Airtek Snorkel
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    Fronrunner Roofrack
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    Dual Battery + Inverter
    LightForce Spots + Lightbars
    BushBaby Boswa with Howling Moon Rooftop Tent

  17. #12
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    2 years in advance?

    you're probably an academic, let me guess, something to do with accounting ?
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Hi Jelo, yes I an academic. Not in accounting.

    Stan, if I may ask: how did you experience border crossings as well as road blocks and stops?

    Thanks!

    J
    Johann

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    OL Steel Bumper
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  19. #14
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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Hi Johann, my advice would be to stick with the Toyota as per your research - you will be very hard-pressed to find spares and expertise for a Patrol if anything breaks outside of a major city. And something will break, no matter what vehicle you are driving. Usually, you will break suspension or drive train components, or you will pick up fuel delivery issues, or you will have problems with tyres.

    So make those three issues your priorities. Re suspension, stick to the factory installed suspension and stay clear of raised suspension or any customised builds - when (not if, when) these break, you will probably have to import parts from South Africa if non-factory parts are fitted. If they are original Toyota parts, you'll be able to repair/replace in even fairly remote villages if they have a workshop, not so any other brand other than older Land Rovers (Series, 110s and Defenders).

    Next thing is to make sure you have a good set of tyres, and that they are a common enough size to find replacements in remote areas. Again, bog standard bakkie tyre sizes are the way to go as you will find second hand spares (not necessarily the same brand, but the same size) in roadside repair spots just about anywhere.

    And finally, don't overload your vehicle - overloading results in vehicle crack-up and abandoned trips. The lighter you are, the better. You really don't need a lot of equipment for a long trip - we South Africans are notorious for our over-elaborate camp set-ups.

    Border wise, read my sticky on crossing borders and dealing with officialdom - with the right attitude you shouldn't ever have problems.
    And malaria-wise, I'll wait for the doctors to chip in, but Malarone (Mozzitech) is probably your best bet.
    Tony Weaver

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    Previously Land Rover 1968 SII, 1969 SIIA, 1973 SIII, 1983 Toyota HiLux 2litre, 2006 Land Rover Freelander TD4 HSE.

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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    It is said that the best vehicle for African roads is the Citroen 2CV!

    In East Africa, up until the late 1980s/early 1990s, everyone (except professional safari outfitters) went “on safari” in normal cars - predominately Peugeots. And wait to you see where the ubiquitous Toyota Corrolas get to... Nowadays, we are all too hung up about great big 4x4s. And, yes, most people carry far too much stuff (not pointing fingers at any particular nationality, but Tony is right...). Less is more.

    Remember also that it is possible to drive from the Cape to Cairo on tarmac roads. Someone recently drove an old sports car from the Cape to Cairo, and I know of a group of friends who drove Porsches from the UK to the Cape a few years ago. Not that I am recommending staying on tarmac roads as you will miss some iconic destinations, but just trying to put it into perspective.

    Tony is correct, of course. On the roads less travelled the three issues will be suspension, suspension, and suspension. Dodgy diesel is not such an issue nowadays if bought where the local trucks buy their diesel. Tyres too are much better nowadays and we only had three punctures in 35,000 miles, but we did chose to get two new tyres in Nairobi (on our way south), and two more in Cape Town. The new ones went on the front, the old front ones put on the back, and the old back ones as spares. It worked for us. We also carry all methods of fixing punctures after being scarred by 21 punctures on a trip to Lake Turkana in 1986 - fixing them with a foot pump in those days was no joke!

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    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    It is said that the best vehicle for African roads is the Citroen 2CV!

    In East Africa, up until the late 1980s/early 1990s, everyone (except professional safari outfitters) went “on safari” in normal cars - predominately Peugeots. And wait to you see where the ubiquitous Toyota Corrolas get to... Nowadays, we are all too hung up about great big 4x4s. And, yes, most people carry far too much stuff (not pointing fingers at any particular nationality, but Tony is right...). Less is more.

    Remember also that it is possible to drive from the Cape to Cairo on tarmac roads. Someone recently drove an old sports car from the Cape to Cairo, and I know of a group of friends who drove Porsches from the UK to the Cape a few years ago. Not that I am recommending staying on tarmac roads as you will miss some iconic destinations, but just trying to put it into perspective.

    Tony is correct, of course. On the roads less travelled the three issues will be suspension, suspension, and suspension. Dodgy diesel is not such an issue nowadays if bought where the local trucks buy their diesel. Tyres too are much better nowadays and we only had three punctures in 35,000 miles, but we did chose to get two new tyres in Nairobi (on our way south), and two more in Cape Town. The new ones went on the front, the old front ones put on the back, and the old back ones as spares. It worked for us. We also carry all methods of fixing punctures after being scarred by 21 punctures on a trip to Lake Turkana in 1986 - fixing them with a foot pump in those days was no joke!
    This has made me crack up, those old Peugeot 504s would go anywhere. There’s a Toyota model called a “pro box” very popular here in kenya. It’s probably based off a corolla, leaf sprung at the rear on some and the cheapest car you can buy. Friends and I were climbing a steep sandy hill in champagne ridge and one flew past us. Mind you we were crawling up with low range and locked up
    I have almost seen a pro box in every “remote” place ive been to...

    I can only wonder at what a trip to lake Turkana in 1986 must have been like

    That 1HZ in east africa is king, most current mechanics started on that engine and are still working on it. The 300tdi is probably the closest Land Rover variant in coverage but it is still nowhere near the TOYs here. Growing up it used to be the older series Landrover’s. This is why I’d like to “revive” my 1hz 80series cruiser.

    i see very few patrols as compared to Landrover’s and Landcruiser’s in kenya. We have lots of minivans but I doubt they share too many parts. However a patrols drive train components are considered bulletproof by many. Don’t worry about diesel In kenya Keep it shell and total and you’ll be fine.

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to atakanmerdin For This Useful Post:


  23. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Kimberley
    Age
    34
    Posts
    66
    Thanked: 9

    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Hey Guys,

    Thanks for all the cool info. As for the car, I have 2 - 2,5 years to find a suitable 76 LC SW in 4.2 1HZ engine. If I find a low mileage model (less than 100 000 km), be assured that I will take it. If not, will a V8 LC SW 76 do any good? Besides the 50 ppm requirement, am I correct in understanding that this engine is no different than other turbo diesel engine tech with sensitive and complex technologies? If I find a 4.2 1HZ, I'll take it. If I don't, I don't see the sense in forking out 800k on a 76 V8 that will do no better than my current Patrol? Is my reasoning OK here? I am not going to sell my Patrol. Being the age it is, I will get nothing for it. Besides, I really like it. I will 'ad' the 76 as a second-4x4 should I buy it, for the purpose of desolate travels deep into Africa.
    Last edited by Van Halen; 2018/02/12 at 04:33 PM.
    Johann

    2013 Nissan Patrol GU

    OL Steel Bumper
    Tough Dog Heavy Duty Suspension
    TJM Airtek Snorkel
    VRS 12500lbs Winch
    Fronrunner Roofrack
    EEZI Awn Rooftop Tent
    Dual Battery + Inverter
    LightForce Spots + Lightbars
    BushBaby Boswa with Howling Moon Rooftop Tent

  24. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cape Town
    Age
    62
    Posts
    9,777
    Thanked: 1760

    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Is this vehicle still available, perhaps? (A bit pricey, but looks like it fits the bill).

    http://www.4x4community.co.za/classi...for-sale/cat/4
    Tony Weaver

    1991 Land Rover 110 Hi-Line S/W 3.5l V8 carburettor
    Cooper Discoverer STT tyres, four sleeper Echo rooftop tent
    2012 Mitsubishi Outlander.

    Previously Land Rover 1968 SII, 1969 SIIA, 1973 SIII, 1983 Toyota HiLux 2litre, 2006 Land Rover Freelander TD4 HSE.

  25. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Kimberley
    Age
    34
    Posts
    66
    Thanked: 9

    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Mileage? 164 000. Not a bit stiff?
    Johann

    2013 Nissan Patrol GU

    OL Steel Bumper
    Tough Dog Heavy Duty Suspension
    TJM Airtek Snorkel
    VRS 12500lbs Winch
    Fronrunner Roofrack
    EEZI Awn Rooftop Tent
    Dual Battery + Inverter
    LightForce Spots + Lightbars
    BushBaby Boswa with Howling Moon Rooftop Tent

  26. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Somerset West
    Age
    46
    Posts
    343
    Thanked: 113

    Default Re: 2020 East Africa Trip Preparations

    Van Halen, it would be good to hook up with you!

    Yes, we are in CT, but would be great to hear your plans.

    Our "sabbatical" trip is with our daughter in 2020/2021.

    Stan and Tony and Wazungu have been REALLY REALLY helpful in keeping us motivated and always provide great advice.

    Our car is a 1999 105 4.2D GX manual.

    And we love it to bits. She really is beautiful to drive and does go anywhere.

    Our only has low mileage because the engine was replaced.

    Please drop me a PM with your email address. Would be great to stay in touch!
    Last edited by Slowones; 2018/02/12 at 04:57 PM.

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