How to service your vehicle yourself.





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  1. #1
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    Default How to service your vehicle yourself.

    The purpose of starting this thread is to help those people who want to get more involved with how their cars work by explaining the ins and outs of a standard service to a vehicle. Maybe it can progress to more complicated work as we go on, let's see. Please help me by adding bits if I do miss something.



    Tools Required for a basic service:
    • A set of flat/ phillips screw drivers
    • A socket set, 3/8" drive is ok for most applications
    • spanner set, 8 - 21mm
    • Feeler guage
    • Filter wrench to remove oil filter
    • Container for used engine oil
    • Clean rags
    Nice to haves:
    • Torque wrench 10 - 40NM for spark plugs and oil drain plug
    • Wifes' vacuum cleaner to clean spark plug holes
    • Crawler to slide in and out underneath vehicle when removing oil filter and drain plug
    • Pressure washer to clean engine before working on it
    • Workshop manual
    • Surgical gloves to keep dirty oil off your skin
    • Flight hand cleaner
    Service Kit:


    Petrol engines:
    • Air filter
    • Fuel filter/s
    • Spark plugs
    • Oil filter
    • Oil
    • Sump plug washer
    • points (if equipped)
    • condenser (if equipped)
    Diesel engines:
    • Air filter
    • Diesel filter/s
    • Oil filter
    • Sump plug washer
    • Oil
    Servicing a petrol engine:
    • Vehicle must be on a level surface
    • Engine should still be warm, leave the vehicle to stand for 2 - 3 hours after driving. The oil should still be warm, but you have less chance of burning yourself with hot oil.
    • Remove the oil dipstick and oil cap.
    • Slide in underneath the vehicle remembering to take the container for the dirty oil and the correct spanner/ socket combination with you
    • Undo the sump plug, it should be right at the bottom of the engine
    • Undo the last few threads by hand, being careful not to burn yourself. You can let the plug fall into the oil, but rather hold onto it as fishing for a plug in dirty oil isn't great.
    • Allow the oil to drain into the container.
    • Proceed with the removal of the oil filter. If tightened correctly you should be able to remove it by hand, otherwise use the filter wrench to loosen it.
    • Make sure the old oil filter's rubber seal does not stick to the engine.
    • The filter may still be full of oil so make sure the Container is big enough to catch the oil that will come out of the filter when removed.
    • I usually put the old filter into a plastic bag to avoid further spills.
    • Now get up look into the engine compartment and locate the air filter box.
    • Undo the retaining clips or screws of the air filter box.
    • Lift out the old air filter carefully trying not to get dust into the air filter box. If you do get dust in the box, wipe it out carefully with a clean rag.
    • Fit the new filter into the airbox and secure the lid properly ensuring any gaskets fit snuggly where they should.
    • Locate the fuel filter.
    • Loosen the clamps around the pipe or bolts on the filter using the correct screw driver or spanner.
    • On fuel systems with rubber hose, clamp the fuel line from the petrol tank with a vice grip or simply fold the pipe in half to prevent fuel spillage. DON'T clamp steel fuel lines
    • Remove the old filter.
    • Insert the new filter and tighten the clamps or fittings. Do not overtighten especially the steel line fittings.
    • Steel lines with fittings usually have copper washers as gaskets. Only tighten about a 1/2 to 3/4 turn after it snugs up. The washer is squashed thus providing a positive seal.
    • To undo the spark plugs start at one end of the engine and pull the plug wires off the spark plugs one at a time by pulling on the rubber shrouds and NOT the wires themselves. It is a good idea to mark the wires as you pull them off, thus ensuring you don't accidentally fit the wires in the wrong order.
    • If your vehicle has coil packs for each spark plug, undo the cover plate on the head, then undo the retaining screws that hold them in place. Unclip the wiring harness from each coil pack being carefull not to break the clips, if necessary mark the wires to ensure they go back in the right order. Gently pull the coil pack off by gripping the tabs on the coil packs. NEVER pull out a coil pack by pulling on a wire.
    • Using the appropriate spark plug socket and extensions proceed to loosen the spark plugs. Once loose they can ususally be srewed out by hand.
    • Use a vacuum cleaner to suck up all the debris around the spark plug holes.
    • If your vehicle is fitted with points undo the distributor cap.
    • Pull off the rotor and plastic dust cover.
    • The points should be under the dust cover.
    • Undo the retaining screws on the points and the condenser which is usually attached to the side of the distributor noting exactly how they come out.
    • Fit the new points and condenser in the same way as the old ones came out,but don't completely tighten down the points. Get your feeler guage.
    • Using a suitable spanner turn the crank pulley until the cam lobe on the distributor shaft is at its highest point against the points rubbing block. Now select the correct thickness blade/s from your feeler guage as per the specifications of the points gap on your vehicle(Usually found in the owners manual, but also obtainable from the shop where you buy the spares)
    • Insert the feeler guage between the contact points and adjust the points gap until you can insert the feeler guage into the gap with only a slight drag being felt.
    • Tighten down the points, refit the dust cap and rotor, then clip on the distributor cap.
    • Before fitting the new spark plugs check the spark gap by using a feeler guage set to the correct gap as per the vehicle owners' manual. A safe gap for most applications is 0.7mm. If the gap is too small, gently pry the tang open with a flat screw driver until the gap is right and you can insert the feeler guage with a slight drag. If the gap is too big, tap the end of the spark plug against a hard surface until the desired gap is achieved.
    • When fitting the new spark plugs it is VERY important to note that the initial thread in should be done by hand ie. DO NOT use a ratchet as this may cause cross threading.
    • If the spark plugs are recessed in the head make use of the socket and extension bar only and turn the extension by hand NOT a ratchet.
    • I usually put a small amount of engine oil onto the threads to assist not only in easy fitment but also because it makes loosening of the spark plugs at the next service that much easier.
    • When you start threading in the new spark plugs(BY HAND) do it very gently. If you feel any resistance in threading them in STOP IMMEDIATELY. It means the plug is not in straight and forcing it will result in cross threading which is VERY expensive to fix.
    • As soon as the plug snugs up against the head take the ratchet and turn the plug another 1/2 to 3/4 turn only. The plug has a washer that squashes under pressure, if you tighten it any further you risk damaging the threads inside the head at great cost to yourself. If you have a torque wrench it makes this operation much less of a risky proposition. Torque the spark plugs up to between 18 and 23NM or to what is printed on the spark plug packages.
    • With this done, put back the plug wires or coil packs onto the spark plugs in the right order and re-attach all the necessary wires and screws(You did remember to label the wires didn't you?)
    • By this time the oil would have drained completely, get back underneath the vehicle and using a clean rag wipe off the small drop of oil that will still be hanging out of the plug hole. Clean the oil plug with a clean rag, remove the old copper washer from the plug and fit the new washer.
    • Thread the plug into the plug hole by hand until snug, now use the appropriate spanner and turn the plug another 1/2 to 3/4 turn. The waher will squash under the pressure ensuring a good seal. Don't overtighten the plug as it may damage the threads on the plug or plug hole and cause a leak. If you have a torque wrench tighten the plug to the correct value.
    • The new filter will have a rubber seal on the inner rim, remove the seal and cover the seal with a thin film of clean engine oil.
    • Re-fit the seal to the filter.
    • Wipe the area where the filter mounts with a clean rag.
    • Spin the filter on until snug, then tighten the filter by hand for another 1/2 to 1 turn. If it is too tight it will leak in addition to being difficult to remove at the next service, that rubber seal will do the work of sealing.
    • Get back out from underneath the vehicle and get the oil handy.
    • Fill the engine with the required amount of oil.
    • Give the oil a few minutes to settle into the engine.
    • Wipe off the dipstick with a clean rag and re-insert into engine.
    • Remove dipstick and check the oil level. It should be just above the full mark as the filter won't have taken up its share of oil.
    • Replace the oil cap and start the engine.
    • Check for any leaks around the filter, if there is a leak switch off the engine and tighten the filter by another 1/4 of a turn.
    • If you have to tighten it more than twice this way the seal on the filter is out of position and you will have to undo it and rectify the problem, fortunately you won't need to replace a lot of oil as the filter sits above sump level, but be sure to clean the sealing surface with a clean cloth before re-fitting.
    • Check the engine oil level again and add oil as required.
    • The service is now complete.
    Diesel Engines:

    • Vehicle must be on a level surface
    • Engine should still be warm, leave the vehicle to stand for 2 - 3 hours after driving. The oil should still be warm, but you have less chance of burning yourself with hot oil.
    • Remove the oil dipstick and oil cap.
    • Slide in underneath the vehicle remembering to take the container for the dirty oil and the correct spanner/ socket combination with you
    • Undo the sump plug, it should be right at the bottom of the engine
    • Undo the last few threads by hand, being careful not to burn yourself. You can let the plug fall into the oil, but rather hold onto it as fishing for a plug in dirty oil isn't great.
    • Allow the oil to drain into the container.
    • Proceed with the removal of the oil filter. If tightened correctly you should be able to remove it by hand, otherwise use the filter wrench to loosen it.
    • Make sure the old oil filter's rubber seal does not stick to the engine.
    • The filter may still be full of oil so make sure the Container is big enough to catch the oil that will come out of the filter when removed.
    • I usually put the old filter into a plastic bag to avoid further spills.
    • Now get up look into the engine compartment and locate the air filter box.
    • Undo the retaining clips or screws of the air filter box.
    • Lift out the old air filter carefully trying not to get dust into the air filter box. If you do get dust in the box, wipe it out carefully with a clean rag.
    • Fit the new filter into the airbox and secure the lid properly ensuring any gaskets fit snuggly where they should.
    • Remove the diesel filter by spinning it of its housing. It should be removable by hand, but you can remove it with a filter wrench.
    • Make sure the old diesel filter's rubber seal does not stick to the engine.
    • Put the old filter into a plastic bag to prevent further spills.
    • Prime the new filter with clean diesel. This will help to get the engine running as the priming pump doesn't always work that well.
    • Clean the sealing surface of the housing with a clean cloth.
    • Spin the diesel filter onto the housing and after it snugs tighten it by hand another 1/2 to 3/4 turn. you do not need to cover the filter seal in a film of oil as priming it with diesel covers it in a thin film already.
    • By this time the oil would have drained completely, get back underneath the vehicle and using a clean rag wipe off the small drop of oil that will still be hanging out of the plug hole. Clean the oil plug with a clean rag, remove the old copper washer from the plug and fit the new washer.
    • Thread the plug into the plug hole by hand until snug, now use the appropriate spanner and turn the plug another 1/2 to 3/4 turn. The waher will squash under the pressure ensuring a good seal. Don't overtighten the plug as it may damage the threads on the plug or plug hole and cause a leak. If you have a torque wrench tighten the plug to the correct value.
    • The new filter will have a rubber seal on the inner rim, remove the seal and cover the seal with a thin film of clean engine oil.
    • Re-fit the seal to the filter.
    • Wipe the area where the filter mounts with a clean rag.
    • Spin the filter on until snug, then tighten the filter by hand for another 1/2 to 1 turn. If it is too tight it will leak in addition to being difficult to remove at the next service, that rubber seal will do the work of sealing.
    • Get back out from underneath the vehicle and get the oil handy.
    • Fill the engine with the required amount of oil.
    • Give the oil a few minutes to settle into the engine.
    • Wipe off the dipstick with a clean rag and re-insert into engine.
    • Remove dipstick and check the oil level. It should be just above the full mark as the filter won't have taken up its share of oil.
    • Replace the oil cap and start the engine.
    • If the engine stutters, just keep the fuel pedal fully depressed while your assistant pumps the primer pump. the engine will eventually run smooth. This is a trick I learned and it worked on the Isuzu 280DT and Toyota 2C/3C engines as well as a Mitsu forklift I worked on. Just don't let the engine over rev.
    • Check for any leaks around the filters, if there is a leak switch off the engine and tighten the filter by another 1/4 of a turn.
    • If you have to tighten it more than twice this way the seal on the filter is out of position and you will have to undo it and rectify the problem, fortunately you won't need to replace a lot of oil as the filter sits above sump level, but be sure to clean the sealing surface with a clean cloth before re-fitting. The same goes for the diesel filter.
    • Check the engine oil level again and add oil as required.
    • The service is now complete.
    Here is a tip. Keep all the receipts from your spares purchases as proof of service history.
    Suggestions from other members:

    Andre:

    I was taught a trick at a training course. Loosen the spark plugs about one turn, start the engine and rev it a little bit. It will blow most dirt away.

    If you have an older vehicle that still uses conventional points and condenser the replacement of the condenser is in most cases not necessary. Check the condition of the points and if not very much pitted, leave the condenser alone. It may well last the lifetime of your vehicle.

    KB: Andre, that is a valid point about condensors, although if you want to go that route ie. not replacing the condensor then at least keep a spare set of points and a condensor in the glove box.

    Mitch:

    Good write up, one more tip. If the filter sits vertical fill it with oil before putting it on. The oil system wont be starved while it fills the filter, subsequently dont rev the motor on the first start up once the oil has been filled. My experience anyway.

    andre plant:

    Buy/Download a manual - they can be expensive but it is money well worth spending.

    Latex gloves are the best thing around and I always use them. They save your hands and are cheap. I always buy a whole lot from my nearest pharmacy and wherever I go I have a whole pile with me. I have used them in situations where there is no water for cleaning and believe me, they are worth the nominal price they cost.

    Copaslip coatings on all threads.

    Download a service schedule or find it in your manual and do what it says, even though it can be a pain in the a**.

    Find a garage who can take your old oil and filter. I am lucky in that my neighbour has his own garage so I give the used stuff to him.

    Shop around for prices on spares. You will be astounded at the price variance on the same item.

    Tin of good handcleaner at home and always in the vehicle. The wife gets turned off at the sight of smelly hands and dirty fingernails. The latex gloves are a blessing in this case!

    The attitude to try and do it yourself. It is the only way to learn and from starting by changing your oil or sparkplugs you pick up confidence and try more and more things that you may not have thought you could do. This of course will help you when you are in the outdoors and something goes wrong. The amount of people I have met who do not know one end of a spanner from the other amazes me. It is so empowering to DIY your own vehicle.

    KB: Copper grease is great for most threads except spark plugs. It can actually insulate the spark plug so that the heat from combustion does not get dissipated into the head to be cooled by water/ air. The result from this heat retention is inevitably pre-ignition or ping as it is called. An engine that pings will ultimately destroy the main bearings and saddles or burn holes into your engine's pistons.

    KB: I read this in a "hot rodders" manual about VW aircooled engines. It may have been a tip for beetles only because beetle engines are very prone to pinging and need all the help they can get to prevent this from happening. Although if you think about it, if it keeps in the heat on a beetle it may do the same on other vehicles as well.

    Let's look at it from a tuners' perspective. In order to get the most performance out of an engine you need to advance the ignition timing as far as possible without the engine pinging. Pinging is a result of petrol igniting spontaneously, this is primarily caused by protrusions(sharp ends such as the spark plug) in the combustion chamber getting hot enough to act as an ignition source. As you advance the timing engine performance picks up, creating more heat, thus heating the protrusions more up to a point when enough timing advance creates enough heat to cause pre-ignition.

    Copper grease is an insulator, it hinders the dissipation of heat between the spark plug and head material, thus the point where pinging occurs is at a much lower point in the timing advance curve. On stock older engines the factory timing advance is very low to allow for the use of low octane fuels without pinging. Without getting too technical here modern electronic ignitions have knock sensors that detect pinging and retard ignition timing accordingly(This is primarily to ensure proper running with various octane fuels). So maybe without even knowing it applying copper grease to spark plugs may have been costing the engine a few HP. Either way by applying copper grease to spark plugs it decreases the performance potential of your vehicles' engine. This is just MHO

    4ePajero:

    I must say that although I don't dispute it, it's he first time I heard the warning about copper-slip on spark plugs. I used it all the years I had petrol engines, without problems.

    Tips on hand cleaning:

    1. Take a bar of green Sunlight soap and before you start working, scratch with your nails over the surface, to get soap under your nails. Leave it there, and your nails will be easier to clean afterwards.
    2. Take a bit of either Sunlight liquid or hand cleaner (without the grit). Work a teaspoonful into each of your hands. Rub in until dry. Don't wash! This will make cleaning afterwards much easier. A few years ago this was sold as 'Hand Glove' and works well.
    3. If your hands have diesel oil on them, it's very difficult to clean. 'Wash' you hands first with a bit of ATF. It loosens the diesel oil and can then be cleaned with hand cleaner.

    BMC:

    A Tip - don't use one of those Addis Sumpy's for draining oil. It does a good job of spraying oil all over the place and the hole is also too small to handle the volume of oil that rushes out of the sump.
    Try a 20l container and cut it to allow oil to drain in and leave the cap area whole and then just remove cap to pour into waste container.
    If you do have some oil spill on the garage floor, sprinkle some dry cement over the spill.

    JMK:

    This is really a great summary. As many said, a manual to run the work is essential, even better is the complete workbook from the garages. I had a few in the 80's when repairing cars during studying in Germany to earn some money for a smarter student life.

    ChrisF:

    Excellent article.

    I also use a "small quantity" of CopaSlip on the plugs. It helps to prevent Carbon deposits in the thread.

    When changing a fuel filter, take note of the "direction of flow".

    Uys:

    Another easy way to clean your garage floor after an oil spil is to use Paint brush cleaner. It allows the oil to dissolve in water, so that you can wipe everything off with a wet rag.

    Greg:

    I have always used copper grease on spark plugs and have never had or heard of any issues.

    JMK:

    Ups ...this is a "no-go" in Germany. When you use copper grease, you reduce the friction and therefore have physically higher torque than forseen when using a torque wrench (sorry - don't know the english word for "Drehmomentschlüssel"...)
    Last edited by Koebelwagen; 2009/01/19 at 07:31 PM. Reason: Updated post Thank you
    Brandt Theunissen
    2019 Mahindra S6 Pik Up S/C 4x4
    2007 Mercedes Benz ML500 5.5
    1968 VW Beetle 2276

  2. #2
    4ePajero Guest

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    Nice thread.
    Please move it to "Vehicle & Technical" section. I'll then make it sticky.

    I suggest you edit your first post to include other input.
    Last edited by 4ePajero; 2009/01/17 at 07:41 AM. Reason: Done

  3. #3
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    Wifes' vacuum cleaner to clean spark plug holes
    I was taught a trick at a training course. Loosen the spark plugs about one turn, start the engine and rev it a little bit. It will blow most dirt away.

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    Good write up, one more tip. If the filter sits vertical fill it with oil before putting it on. The oil system wont be starved while it fills the filter, subsequently dont rev the motor on the first start up once the oil has been filled. My experience anyway 8)

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    If you have an older vehicle that still uses conventional points and condenser the replacement of the condenser is in most cases not necessary. Check the condition of the points and if not very much pitted, leave the condenser alone. It may well last the lifetime of your vehicle.

    Just a money making racket, also found many new condensers to be duds.

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    Andre, that is a valid point about condensors, although if you want to go that route ie. not replacing the condensor then at least keep a spare set of points and a condensor in the glove box.
    Brandt Theunissen
    2019 Mahindra S6 Pik Up S/C 4x4
    2007 Mercedes Benz ML500 5.5
    1968 VW Beetle 2276

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    nicely done
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    Hey Koebelwagen,

    great thread, I learnt how to service Series and Defender Landies and now I service my own Pajero 2.8. This is what I have learnt:

    Buy/Download a manual - they can be expensive but it is money well worth spending.

    Latex gloves are the best thing around and I always use them. They save your hands and are cheap. I always buy a whole lot from my nearest pharmacy and wherever I go I have a whole pile with me. I have used them in situations where there is no water for cleaning and believe me, they are worth the nominal price they cost.

    Copaslip coatings on all threads.

    Download a service schedule or find it in your manual and do what it says, even though it can be a pain in the a**.

    Find a garage who can take your old oil and filter. I am lucky in that my neighbour has his own garage so I give the used stuff to him.

    Shop around for prices on spares. You will be astounded at the price variance on the same item.

    Tin of good handcleaner at home and always in the vehicle. The wife gets turned off at the sight of smelly hands and dirty fingernails. The latex gloves are a blessing in this case!

    The attitude to try and do it yourself. It is the only way to learn and from starting by changing your oil or sparkplugs you pick up confidence and try more and more things that you may not have thought you could do. This of course will help you when you are in the outdoors and something goes wrong. The amount of people I have met who do not know one end of a spanner from the other amazes me. It is so empowering to DIY your own vehicle.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    Mitsubishi Pajero 2.8

  9. #9
    4ePajero Guest

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    I must say that although I don't dispute it, it's he first time I heard the warning about copper-slip on spark plugs. I used it all he years I had petrol engines, without problems.

    Tips on hand cleaning:

    1. Take a bar of green Sunlight soap and before you start working, scratch with your nails over the surface, to get soap under your nails. Leave it there, and your nails will be easier to clean afterwards.
    2. Take a bit of either Sunlight liquid or hand cleaner (without the grit). Work a teaspoonful into each of your hands. Rub in until dry. Don't wash! This will make cleaning afterwards much easier. A few years ago this was sold as 'Hand Glove' and works well.
    3. If your hands have diesel oil on them, it's very difficult to clean. 'Wash' you hands first with a bit of ATF. It loosens the diesel oil and can then be cleaned with hand cleaner.

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    A Tip - don't use one of those Addis Sumpy's for draining oil. It does a good job of spraying oil all over the place and the hole is also too small to handle the volume of oil that rushes out of the sump.
    Try a 20l container and cut it to allow oil to drain in and leave the cap area whole and then just remove cap to pour into waste container.
    If you do have some oil spill on the garage floor, sprinkle some dry cement over the spill.
    Brian Coleman
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    This is really a great summary. As many said, a manual to run the work is essential, even better is the complete workbook from the garages. I had a few in the 80's when repairing cars during studying in Germany to earn some money for a smarter student life.

    But, given the low garage prices here in RSA, I would never "climb under the car" and do the services here on my own...

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    Excellent article.

    I also use a "small quantity" of CopaSlip on the plugs. It helps to prevent Carbon deposits in the thread.

    When changing a fuel filter, take note of the "direction of flow".

    I would like to know more about options for air filters - between services, after doing 4x4

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    Another easy way to clean your garage floor after an oil spil is to use Paint brush cleaner. It allows the oil to dissolve in water, so that you can wipe everything off with a wet rag.
    Everything is a hammer.
    Unless it is a screw driver.

    Then it it a chisel.

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    I like this thread, but the title is how to service your vehicle yourself. However you're only covering engines. Is this intentional or do you intend to incorporate the rest of what I would consider servicing, including brakes, gearbox and transmission oils etc etc

    Also, KW, as "author" of the original post, maybe incorporate the suggestions into your post, then we mods can trim out the stuff to keep the thread clean.

    I don't want to see this become a "General Fortuner Chat" type thread where there is so much chaff and other rubbish.
    2015 Pajero Sport 4x4
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    Hi Simon

    During the next two to three weeks I will be changing the brakes on a Nissan Hardbody. I will do a write up with photos.

    I will also be performing as service that includes a cambelt change to the above vehicle. With write up and photos

    There is a slight chance of me performing a service and cambelt change to a colt rodeo. If this happens, will also do write up with photos.

    I will incorporate the suggestions I received into the original post. May I pm you when done so you can clean up?
    Brandt Theunissen
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    2007 Mercedes Benz ML500 5.5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koebelwagen View Post
    Hi Simon

    During the next two to three weeks I will be changing the brakes on a Nissan Hardbody. I will do a write up with photos.

    I will also be performing as service that includes a cambelt change to the above vehicle. With write up and photos

    There is a slight chance of me performing a service and cambelt change to a colt rodeo. If this happens, will also do write up with photos.

    I will incorporate the suggestions I received into the original post. May I pm you when done so you can clean up?
    Sounds great!

    I don't want to spend too much time on how we do this (although we can remove it later), we could have a couple of sticky threads such as


    • How to Service Your Vehicle Yourself - Engine
    • How to Service Your vehicle Yourself - Brakes


    Or something to that effect. There was an attempt to get something off the ground before, but it was stillborn, so kudos to you for bringing it back to life.

    We mods are more than happy to spend time our working with members who are keen on spending valuable time writing up this kind of thing and then putting it into a workable format.
    2015 Pajero Sport 4x4
    1996 3.5v6 Pajero (For Sale)

    Carpe Diem Scrotum
    Give a man a beer, waste an hour. Teach a man to brew, and waste a lifetime!

  17. #17
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    Default

    Good thread, but a little bit advanced for people to try, replace faulty shocks, and some maintanence under the vehicle, eg checking for loose nuts/bolts damage to mountings, greasing greasable nipples on diff universals and stuff. Once you are under there and comfortable , its easy to do the examination. Some of the stuff can also be done by yourself. Koebelwagen once again nice post.
    ORA
    -------------------------
    Ian

  18. #18
    4ePajero Guest

    Default

    The discussion regarding the use of copper grease or not, is distracting from this excellent thread.

    I moved it here

  19. #19
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    Default Best way of Cleaning Engine cooling components?

    Hi guys,

    I recently took my baby for a mudbath and was just wondering if anyone had any tips on the best way of cleaning the radiator, condenser and charged air cooler without taking the front of the vehicle apart?

    I rinsed most of the mud off when I got home, but by then a lot had already dried and hardened. I can still see some airways blocked.

    Also any tips on engine bay cleaning?

    '10 Mitsubishi Triton 3.2 DiD Manual 4x4
    Lets go play!!

  20. #20
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    Default Wash

    The easiest way to clean the aftercooler and radiator is to pressure wash them and then blow thru with compressed air
    Land Rover 300 Tdi Sadly sold
    Bush lapa Vlooi B263 This is the best investment I ever made,next to SWAMBO asking to marry me
    76 Series LAND CRUISER 4.2 Donkey It' now history
    The black TOUAREG V6 is history Will get one again one that works
    Now TYDSAAM is a PAJERO DiD GLS The Bush Lapa is NO HURRY
    And SWAMBO a TOYOTA YARIS
    The CORSA bakkie for the little tasks

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