Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014





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    Default Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    I have been asked by the king of travel reports, Stan Weakley, if I could post excerpts from our (private) blog of our overland trip. This we did between August 2013 and December 2014.

    **Please note: We had travelled extensively in Tanzania previously - the Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Ruaha, the Selous, Kilwa Kisawani, Saadani, and the East Usambaras - so, on this trip in 2014, we went on the road less travelled and visited some of the off-the-beaten-track places.**


    Kwaheri Kenya, Twende Tanzania
    Kenya-Tanzania, 1 June 2014

    We have had a busy week in Nairobi resorting and repacking the Land Rover, doing a major food resupply, and having a lovely time with the family. Despite media reports, all is well here in Kenya and – on the surface at least – life goes on as normal. However, the rains have not been good in Kenya, and much of the country looks horribly dry.

    This morning, in leafy Karen, we were waved off by the family. We took the more interesting route and drove along the edge of the Ngong Hills. Karen Blixen (“I had a farm in Africa at the foot of the Ngong Hills”) would be horrified at the development. Shortly after the Ngongs, we saw far in front of us the snowy peaks of Kilimanjaro floating above the haze. They stayed clear until the border, where the crossing was comparatively painless and quick. We then sped along pristine tarmac to Arusha with Kilimanjaro (which we climbed in 1990) slowly clouding over, but compensated for by clear views of Mt Meru.

    Just at the start of the town of Arusha, the notorious Tanzanian traffic police pulled us over: Hugh had been forced to cross a white line by a truck that we were passing on a climbing lane, and this was deemed “contrary to the Law of Tanzania”. We were relieved of 30,000 Tanzanian shillings and, armed with an official receipt, we carefully drove into Arusha and found the pleasant Masai Campsite. This evening, a friend’s daughter who teaches in Arusha is joining us for supper here at our camp.

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    Safari Njema: Into the Heart of Tanzania
    Tanzania, 2-6 June 2014

    We have had a lovely start to our Tanzanian journey. SB joined us for dinner in our Arusha campsite, and we had a good long chinwag. The next morning, we frightened the life out of the poor girl who was manning the TANAPA desk at the local Exim Bank by asking her do her job. For most Tanzanian National Parks, it is necessary to procure and charge a TANAPA smart card, which is then debited on entry to a Park. This is a sensible scheme to reduce corruption and, indeed, the opportunities for violent crime. It helps, however, if the bank staff selling the cards know how the system works. I am being slightly unfair: the lassie did not know the prices, or how to read the TANAPA list of charges, but did, in fact, manage – eventually – to give us what we needed.

    Thus armed, we headed down to Lake Manyara National Park, and ensconced ourselves in a nice campsite on the banks of the (dry) Endabash river. We had the site to ourselves, and there were clean loo blocks and showers with running water, and even loo paper and soap. Unheard of in Kenya! The only downside was that the loo blocks had been constructed on the banks of the river, rather obscuring the view from the rest of the campsite. So, in the evening, we sat with our drinks between two of the blocks, and were treated to the sight of a magnificent bull elephant quietly wandering across a clearing on the far side of the river.

    The following morning, we set out early on a game drive and within half an hour we found the classic Lake Manyara sight – two lionesses about 5 metres up in a tree. Lake Manyara is famous for its tree-climbing lions, but we had been told that, in recent years, it was a rare sight. We watched them for a while until one of the lionesses decided she was going to descend: lions do not look natural in trees, and her means of getting down showed that they weren’t designed to be arboreal – she had to turn around and come down backwards. We felt very privileged, not only to have seen them, but all to ourselves. We spent two nights in Lake Manyara and clocked up 71 species on the bird front including, of course, flamingos, flocks of which cause the lake to appear pink in places. Elephants abounded, but we didn’t see any more cats.

    After an idyllic two days, we packed up camp and headed out a little-used gate in the SW side of the Park. This track took us through small shambas (farms) and tiny villages until we joined IM’s father’s road (which he had had built in the 1950s when he was DC Mbulu under the British Colonial Administration). Shortly after joining this dirt road, we decided to go and look at a waterfall and see whether it would be possible to wild camp there. It was a fabulous spot, and a local we talked to said it was okay for us to camp anywhere along the river (thank goodness for my rudimentary Swahili). We selected a perfect place under some fig trees overlooking the dry part of the river bed and, in the near distance, the waterfall. After a snack lunch, a walk, and a snooze on our camp beds, we pitched the tent, had tea, drinks and dinner. The chap we had talked to earlier came and collected firewood for us and we cooked steaks on the fire (unfortunately, he decided he was going to stay sitting near us all night, but hey…). Just as we had finished dinner, we felt a few spots of rain and quickly put up the tent’s verandah before everything got completely soaked. We managed to do the washing up under the verandah, and continued – despite the rain – enjoying this perfect wild camping spot.

    The following morning, the rain had abated, and we packed up camp and headed up KM’s road. It is in excellent shape, had been recently graded, and work was being done in putting in more reinforced concrete slabs at the steeper sections, and sharper corners. The dirt road wound up and up to the Mbulu Highlands with sensational views down to Lake Manyara and the Rift Valley. At Mbulu, we filled up with fuel – and a few other itemss – and took some photos for IM. From Mbulu we headed west on another unknown dirt road to a place called Haidom where we camped in the grounds of a Lutheran Church and guesthouse. We had taken a room in the guesthouse in order to use the loos and shower, but caused consternation by wishing to sleep in our tent in the grounds. Unfortunately, the rain started again in the late afternoon, and we had a rather dismal time watching the rain pour off the tent verandah, but we still managed to cook a proper dinner.

    Early to bed, early to rise and this morning we packed up our soggy camp and headed West. Our route, again, took us through tiny rural roads, villages and shambas, with areas of scrub and grazing alternating with fields of maize, sunflowers, cotton and sorghum, bounded by sisal hedges. The Tanzanian rural roads (and, indeed, all the roads) are in infinitely better condition than those in Kenya, but it is not such a developed country and there is much less traffic. Eventually, we hit tarmac on a main road, and sped along that as best we could (bearing in mind the hordes of traffic police at almost every tiny village, and Hugh’s previous misdemeanour). We decided to come off the tarmac and “cut the corner” on the way to Tabora, and turned down a small dirt track which wound its way through arid countryside, baobabs, and tiny villages.

    In Tabora, we have fallen into the grounds of a rather charming old hotel, in the style of a Bavarian hunting lodge, built by the Germans and dating from before the First War. We are camped in the garden behind the accommodation wings, and the friendly staff have sorted out a shower and loo right beside us. We plan to ambush them with a large bundle of laundry in the morning. It is reputed to have a good restaurant (but all these things are relative), so I am off duty for the moment. The weather seems to have righted itself, and we intend to spend a couple of nights here, doing some ‘history’. Tabora was the centre of the Arab Slave Trade, and some old Arabic structures apparently still survive, amongst them what is believed to be Tippoo Tipp’s house in which both Stanley and Livingstone stayed. And there is, of course, an old German Boma.

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    Footsteps to Lake Tanganyika
    Tanzania, 8-11 June 2014

    Tabora is a rather pleasing town. There are still some old German buildings dating from before the First War – the Railway Station, some houses, the old German Boma and, of course, the Tabora Hotel where we camped. In addition, there are a lot of old British colonial buildings and a golf course. There are some fine boulevards lined with old mango trees.

    The oldest building of note is Livingstone’s Tembe, situated some way out of what is now Tabora. The area, then known as Kazeh, was the collection point for slave caravans from the West, South and North and an Arab slaver had a tembe built here in 1857. The Victorian explorers – despite deploring and attempting to stamp out the slave trade – were dependent on Arab slavers, and Burton and Speke stayed here in 1858. It was from this area that Speke headed North and was the first European to see what he named Lake Victoria. Stanley stayed in the tembe in 1871 on his mission to find Livingstone, and the two men returned here after the famous meeting at Ujiji on Lake Tanganyika. From here, Stanley returned home and Livingstone then went south into modern-day Zambia and died in the Bangweulu Wetlands (where we will be in a few weeks’ time).

    The Arab slave trader’s building – now known as Livingstone’s Tembe – was up a rough sandy track with only one very faded sign off the main road. A single storey building with a verandah in front and a courtyard behind, it is maintained – in very Tanzanian fashion – by the Department of Antiquities. Two very fine ancient mango trees stand in front. Some work was being done on the building by two labourers, one wielding a monstrous sledge hammer to break boulders, while his colleague rested in the sun. There was a helpful curator who regurgitated a set script and knew his dates, but thought Westminster Abbey was in Scotland. He showed us some faded photocopies of various letters and pictures in broken frames, and some dusty artefacts. We were delighted with our visit to the Tembe which marked the start of us following the slave traders’ and explorers’ route West to Lake Tanganyika.

    Back in Tabora, we wanted to see and photograph the Old German Boma. However, it now housed a unit of the Tanzanian Army. Photographing public buildings, airports, barracks etc in the developing world can have one thrown into jail – not something to be recommended here in Tanzania, we felt. So, we parked up and talked to a Corporal who called “the officer”. When the Major eventually arrived, he wanted to consult higher authority, and said he would phone us, but he didn’t want to stop our historical interest (we are still waiting for the call…). However, there is a rather good photo of the Old Boma in the “Invest in Tabora” website which is attempting to encourage tourism by listing all the old buildings of note – perhaps Invest in Tabora ought to have a word with the military authorities … this is Africa…

    Our exploration of the dusty outpost of Tabora continued with more mundane matters such as buying eggs and vegetables in the market, bread in a back-street bakery, and refuelling the Land Rover. In the evening, back at the Tabora Hotel, the local residents – of all nationalities – congregated in the “function tent” and, as the band got louder, and hot competition grew around the pool table, we crept to our tent. Despite the noise from the band, we slept through it all.

    Up at dawn, we packed camp, had breakfast, and headed West. We had anticipated a rough drive down barely existing tracks following the slave route. We had ascertained that there was a new bridge over the Malagarasi River, and that the route seemed now to exist. As it turned out, it was rather a good road, tarred in parts, and otherwise well graded. The Chinese were working hard (or rather supervising some hard work by the locals), and the new (Korean) bridge is spiffing. Periodically we came across groves of ancient mango trees, with a scattering of date palms, often beside some prominent feature, such as a rocky kopje. These were almost certainly the remnants of old camps for the slave trade. After a fairly easy eight hours, including stops (as opposed to Stanley’s 50 days) we had our first glimpse of Lake Tanganyika and rolled into Kigoma.

    Kigoma overtook Ujiji (where Stanley and Livingstone met) as the main town of the area, as a result of the German railway terminus. The Station is a fine Germanic building, with Arabic style arches: Osbert Lancaster would coin a term such as Teuto-equatorial to capture the flavour. There is a busy-ish port, and at the quayside was the MV Liemba, the Old German Graf von Goetzen, which was one of the targets for an eccentric British naval engagement in the First War (and the inspiration behind “The African Queen”). After being scuttled at the mouth of the Malagarasi River, the ship was recovered in 1927, and has served faithfully since then as the main transport across and around Lake Tanganyika. We had a look around it this morning (10 Jun), and it is rather splendid and in reasonable shape, with some lovely teak decking, but it needs a lot of Brasso. It is, apparently, the oldest passenger ferry in the world.

    We are ensconced now in a lovely little campsite on a beach a couple of miles South-West of Kigoma, run by a charming and helpful Norwegian, with a multinational collection of other travellers: German, South African, Icelandic/Norwegian, but surprisingly no Dutch – yet. A Dutch couple we met in Tabora explained that The Netherlands was so small for their population the country could only survive by having a percentage of them away travelling. We have swum in the Lake – a lovely temperature and crystal clear – and we are assured that this rocky and sandy bay is bilharzia free. It is delicious first thing in the morning, when the water temperature is actually above air temperature.

    We have been to pay obeisance at Ujiji. The old main street is very redolent of the Coast, with many small low buildings with wooden doors. Some look to have been there since Livingstone’s day. The monument and museum, however, are a bit sad. A vast new UNESCO building holds some rather embarrassing oil-paintings and explanation boards and a small motley collection of artefacts. Pride of the display, however, is a splendid life-size papier-mâché model of the ‘Dr Livingstone, I presume’ meeting. Down at the Ujiji waterfront, was a charming scene of shacks, boat building, women doing their laundry, babies frolicking in the sand, and fishing boats coming in – it felt as though not much had changed except for the ubiquitous signs for mobile phone companies.

    We will be moving on from here on 12 June to Katavi National Park, and do not anticipate being able to blog again for a wee while.

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    MMBA
    Tanzania, 12-16 June 2014

    generally stands for ‘Miles and Miles of Bloody Africa’. And we have seen this in plenty, but find it all rather lovely.

    After a relaxing few days at Kigoma, we trundled down what we had been warned could be a tough road to Katavi National Park. As it was, the road was fine – dusty, of course, and in places deep enough to cause a problem to bikes, but nothing challenging for a Land Rover. The route took us through some lovely forested limestone ridges, and the whole route – which took 8 hours – was very sparsely populated. At Katavi, we paid to wild camp: Katavi is one of the few parks which allows you to pick your own spot and set up. We found a lovely grove of Acacias near the centre of the park, with ready access to the key game areas and only a few miles from a rangers’ post with a bore-hole for fresh water. Katavi is wild, remote and rarely visited by tourists, although there are a few very up-market camps/lodges spread around the swamps which dominate the park. One very exclusive camp is described in the Bradt Guide as “redolent of the days of Karen Blixen and Denys Finch Hatton”. Well, they haven’t seen our camping set-up which comes complete with cold drinks, and a camp shower hung from a tree (water heated on the camp fire).

    Wild camping, however, is not for the faint-hearted, but we love it. Visitors to our Acacia grove included a herd of elephants (who, being very clever, saw us and moved silently off), giraffes, and impala. At night, lions roared, hyenas “whooped”, and hippos snorted in the nearby river, but we were tucked up cosily in our tent enjoying the full moon shining through the mosi-net tent windows.

    On our first early morning game drive, I spotted the backside of a leopard disappearing into the thick bush, but the driver didn’t. However, we did see its kill hung up in a tree. Despite the noise the lions made overnight, they were very elusive during the day: we did, however, see two young male lions one afternoon. There were HUGE herds of elephants who spent their day in the swamps and emerged into the woodland in the late afternoon. We got rather caught in the middle of a herd one afternoon which did cause a few adrenalin rushes to the driver (no prizes for guessing who that was). It was lovely to see the bull elephant keeping his eye on us whilst ushering the family across the track. Once in the bush, there was quite a lot of trumpeting and ear flapping. The game in Katavi is definitely skittish.

    On one of our game drives, into a remote part of the park, we did come upon a very distressing sight – a poached giraffe and the nearby racks for drying the meat to be sold as bushmeat. We did beat a hasty retreat from this awful sight – and the hundreds of waiting vultures and marabou storks – and went and reported it to the rangers. Whether anything gets done is the question, and we do appreciate the whole vexed issue of human wildlife conflict. At least it wasn’t an elephant.

    After an idyllic four nights in our Acacia grove, we packed up and headed for Kipili on Lake Tanganyika. This four-hour drive took us through slightly more populated areas and out of the Rukwa Rift. The dirt roads were, mostly, in reasonable condition and we rolled into a little paradise – Lakeshore Lodge and Campsite – in time for a late lunch.

    It is hard to believe that such a lovely place can exist so far off the beaten track. Apparently, it used to take the owners 10-11 hours to reach the nearest one-horse town, Sumbawanga. At least the roads have improved and it should take us only 3-4 hours. But here is a lovely beach, with chalets, a bar/restaurant, mown grass, mango trees (below which we are camped), clean loos and showers, and modern boats for exploring the Lake. We intend to go out on one tomorrow for a snorkelling trip to view the Cichlids in the Lake: apparently it has a wonderful variety of these colourful fish. In the distance across the water we can see the hills of the DRC as a faint blue haze. The temperature is perfect, and the water clear and calm. As we have said before, it’s tough, this adventuring.

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    On Lake Tanganyika
    Tanzania, 19 June 2014

    We have just returned from snorkelling in the Lake. Despite a slightly choppy day – resulting in less than perfect clarity – the fish were astonishing. It is rather like a coral reef – with boulders in lieu of coral – with all sorts of fish, in lovely colours, everywhere. Lake Tanganyika does have terrific potential for more tourism: the climate is perfect, the water delicious, and with the Mahale Mountains and Gombe Stream both sites for chimpanzee viewing right on the lake, and Katavi National Park just a few hours away, it seems a shame that Tanzania has done so little so far to exploit it. So, we rather take our hats off to Chris and Louise who have set up this lovely Lodge and we heartily recommend a Western Tanzanian tour to any souls seeking an East African holiday with a difference.

    Tomorrow we are off again heading for Zambia via Sumbawanga for a resupply, and thence down to the Southern end of the Lake where we cross the border. It is uncertain when we will next get decent comms, so until then…

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    On our way back up to Kenya from Cape Town, we crossed back into Tanzania from Mozambique. The following blog excerpts are from November 2014.

    The Ruvuma River Crossing Challenge
    Mozambique-Tanzania, 30 November – 1 December 2014

    We spoke too soon. Not only our confidence about the Ruvuma River crossing, but also in naming one of our previous blogs “This is Africa”. We have had TIA in buckets in the past few days. Africa bites back…

    So, from Quionga, we phoned the Tanzanian ferry captain to enquire about the timings for the following day. On a bad line, in a combination of English and Swahili, the message was received that the ferry wasn’t going to sail for the next three days. No explanation given and phone put down. This is a tide dependant ferry, it only takes a maximum of six vehicles, and can only do one crossing per day on a daylight high tide. What was not clear was whether it wasn’t sailing because of (a) the neap tides and low water levels, or (b) it had broken down; or any number of other reasons …

    An emergency meeting with the Director of Operations was convened, comms established with a friend in Pemba (and a contact running a large trucking and logistics’ operation between Tanzania and Mozambique), and maps spread out. The imponderables, of course, were (1) will the ferry sail again on Wednesday (presuming that the stoppage is because of the neap tide); (2) how many trucks and vehicles will be queuing down at the river and, therefore, how many days will it take to clear the back log; (3) if it is a break down then how long will it take to put right: it could be weeks not days.

    So, we had two choices: (1) sit it out and hope the ferry starts again in three days time; or (2) make a “dirty dash” to Unity Bridge some 250 kms away. Our Tracks4Africa paper map shows distances and timings (based on previous travellers’ GPS tracks) and this said it would take us 12 hours, but we were confident that things had improved since the base tracks were recorded. Our contact running trucks via Unity Bridge assured us that the trucks did it every day, the road wasn’t too awful, and it would take us 6 hours from the coast to the Bridge. That was, of course, only if it was wasn’t raining, but no rain was forecast for the next 10 days. We also went to inspect the ferry crossing, which lies at the end of a rough sandy track with no discernible loading facilities. There a lot of jolly young chaps had no idea about the ferry’s schedule, but were terribly keen for us to hire them to transport the Land Rover on a raft of three boats lashed together with planks. This was an interesting proposition, we felt, but politely declined. So, armed with the best available intelligence, we decided to go for the Bridge.

    We had a lovely cool evening under the mango tree, and went to bed early knowing that we had a long rough drive the following day. At 4am the stars were out and things were looking good; at 5am it started raining. Undeterred, and following the military maxim “order, counter-order, disorder”, and assuring ourselves that it was only a brief shower (which it was, albeit a heavy one), we packed up our now wet camp and set off back to Moçimboa da Praia, then the road to Mueda. At Mueda, the tarmac stopped; as we said before, the Mozambican government in its wisdom hasn’t built a proper road to the Unity Bridge – which was opened with great celebrations with the Tanzanians some seven years ago. Up here near Mueda on the Mozambican Makonde Plateau, there had been some rain overnight and the track was wet and slippery in places, but for the first hour or so the rain held off. We could, however, see huge black clouds rolling towards us. We accepted that we were clearly going to get some rain, but felt that as the track had been dry hitherto, the damage should not be too great, but the sooner we got down it, the better. So, at Mueda, we pressed on. Sure enough, as we dropped off the Makonde plateau, down came the rain. At times parts of track nearly vanished under flowing water, but, as we had guessed, below the water, the track remained fundamentally sound. At one point we encountered 4 massive articulated trucks (clearly those of our logistics contact) parked up, sensibly, at the foot of a steep slippery section. We blessed them for the exercise of such sense: had they tried and blocked the track, we would have been done for. We also hit a few seriously slippery sections, with a greasy slick atop a still hard surface, and the vehicle went for a few experimental slithers before being brought under control. But, after a tense few hours and 180 kilometres from Mueda, we emerged triumphantly on to the 5 kilometres of tarmac that lie across the new bridge.

    This roadway in the middle of the bush is a bit surreal, complete with bus-stop lay-bys, but we shot down it to the Mozambique border post. We made it by 2 o’clock, and felt we were well placed to cross and make it as far as Newala, a further 200 kilometres into Tanzania. We had a minor delay created by the absence of the Mozambique customs officer, who was away visiting his counterparts on the far side of the bridge. After 30 minutes he arrived, dealt quickly with our papers, and we crossed the splendid new bridge, complete with concrete elephant tusks, into Tanzania. At the Tanzanian side, the immigration officer was absent. However, he appeared after 10 minutes, stamped our passports, and we hit customs. Time now, 1545 (we had changed time zones, one hour on from Mozambique), with still ample time for a couple of hundred kilometres, and the Carnet system for the vehicle is very quick and easy – it had never taken more than 5 minutes elsewhere (even entering Uganda where we had had to explain how to use it). An hour later, we were starting to lose the will to live. The customs official was tapping very slowly on the computer and we had the sinking suspicion that he was entering all the vehicle details in order to issue us with a Temporary Import Licence – the very thing that the Carnet is designed to replace. But he assured us that he needed to input all the details on his cranky computer. The heat was intense, the ladies loo was filled with old car tyres and other debris and had no water or plumbing attached to the throne. Keeping a cheery countenance, Hugh assisted the official and eventually we sallied forth at 1700. It had been one of our longest border crossings and we reckon he never charged us for the carbon tax which we have paid (and had to show the police) on our previous two sallies through the country. Hey ho, we were through, and we still had an hour and a half of daylight left.

    However, the nearest secure accommodation was likely to be in Masasi, 105 kms away up a dirt track. So, we had a bit of a bucking bronco ride (although the Tanzanian dirt road was 1000 times better than on the other side of the border), and we pulled into Masasi just on last light. We had been on the road for 11½ hours including the border crossing. Although there is not much to Masasi, the vibrancy and commercialism of Tanzania is striking when compared to Mozambique. To those who have only visited Tanzania, this will seem a surprising comment, but speaks volumes about Mozambique. Masasi Inn is an African hotel, but it ticked all the boxes: secure parking for the Land Rover, clean air-conditioned room, loo, bucket and scoop in lieu of the non-working shower, a bed and mosi net, food and a bar. In the bar, the Everton and Tottenham Hotspurs match was on at full blast – we don’t know who won. The menu was endless variations of roadrunner chicken with chips or rice, but the staff were sweet.

    After a good air-conditioned night, we headed off on to the Tanzanian Makonde Plateau to Newala. Here there is an old German Boma which has a splendid outlook across the Ruvuma Valley back to Mozambique. It appears, however, abandoned. From Newala, we chose to put our faith in an old paper map rather than our GPS, and headed across the plateau on a good dirt road directly to Mtwara passing through cashew nut plantations and processing facilities, and small vibrant villages. Near Mtwara is Mikindani – the original port and town – dominated by another very splendid old German Boma, now restored and run by a UK charitable foundation as a smart training hotel. Luckily, they had a room available, and we are now happily ensconced in the von Lettow-Vorbeck room, sipping Gin and Tonics beside the pool. Every day is different…

    Incidentally, we are about 40 miles from where we started at Quionga, MOZ two days ago, but we have driven 450 miles. What an adventure.

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    Rain is a Blessing
    Tanzania, 2-6 December 2014

    apparently, but we found this quite hard to recognise up on the Rondo Plateau. We are, however, very thankful that we got out of Mozambique when we did or we might be like the broken-down truck we heard of in the DRC whose drivers, when asked how long they had been waiting for a spare part in the middle of the jungle, replied “Oh, about a year”.

    We spent two splendid nights at the Old Boma in Mikindani. This is now a training hotel for young Tanzanians. The youngest trainees are all absolutely terrified, but are doing valiantly at introducing themselves and asking what guests need. Any non-routine answer, however, produces a look of panic. It is all very sweet.

    We have been asked what a boma – German or otherwise – is or was. Boma is the Swahili word for a cattle enclosure/thorn stockade, and was taken into use by the colonial authorities in East Africa, predominantly in German East Africa, for a fort which then became the administrative headquarters. In German East Africa (now Tanzania), a number of bomas were built, and some of these survive to this day in varying states of decrepitude. So, it was very nice to see one that had been properly restored. We can’t think of an example from British East Africa (Kenya) where the word was used for an administrative headquarters, but the Kenya Girls’ High School in Nairobi was known as the “Heifer Boma”.

    Here at Mikindani, we were back in the footsteps of David Livingstone: this was where he started his last expedition. So, we have seen where he started, Ujiji where Stanley found him, Tabora where Stanley left him, and the Bangweulu swamps where he died. Obviously, the German Boma was not there then – it was finished in 1895.

    But we couldn’t just lounge by the pool sipping Gin and Tonics as we had things to do: recharging my Tanzanian SIM card, and changing our leftover Mozambique Meticais. After a good start on communications, we found the bank wouldn’t change Meticais and didn’t have any cash in the ATM. Feeling in need of fortifying at this point we repaired to a cafe across the dusty square: No coffee. This was becoming a very African experience, but, fortunately, our logistics contact assisted with the cash. Re-supplied with cash, we headed off to Msimbati where an eccentric old Englishman had tried to form an independent sultanate in the early 1960s: he wrote countless letters to the United Nations – and anyone else he could think of – but was eventually deported from the independent Tanzania in the late 1960s. This peninsula is now part of a marine reserve, but a huge pipeline has been laid through it. There was, however, a lodge marked on our map and we rolled into this rundown place. We were assured by a Belgian man and his Congolese French-speaking wife that we could have lunch. So, we had a beer in the shade overlooking the beach, and waited and waited. An hour and a half later, we left without lunch. Back at the Old Boma at Mikindani, the attentive staff served us a delicious dinner which made up for missing lunch.

    The following morning, it was raining. As we headed North, we were in two minds as to whether to stay on the coast, or to risk some higher ground inland on the Rondo Plateau. We compromised by going to Lindi first, where the British had had an important administrative headquarters, and there were some rather atmospheric abandoned residences strung along the back of the beach, and a mix of completely ruined and abandoned offices and some still functioning government agencies. All in all, we rather liked Lindi in its decrepit, somnolent way.

    As the weather was looking slightly more cheerful, we decided to go on up to the Rondo Plateau. Here, we understood, was an Anglican Seminary founded by Trevor Huddleston when he was the local Bishop of Masasi. It all sounded rather intriguing, with some nice scenery and potential birding. We found the Seminary okay, and it was indeed a lovely spot, perched on the edge of the plateau with stunning views. The church had been constructed with panorama windows either side of the altar, with stained glass above. The whole effect was very striking, albeit all the clear glass on one side had disappeared. This was indicative of the state of the rest of the Mission, which was clearly still functioning. We were kindly received by various clergy, and shown a nice place to camp at the very edge of the complex, beside their guesthouse, the ablutions of which were made available to us. This guesthouse had probably been the principal’s house at one stage, but was now in a sad state of disrepair. We set up camp and then observed with some nervousness clouds and rain gathering across the plateau and seeming to be moving our way. Sure enough, it hit us, and golly, it came down. For the next two hours we could only take shelter from the torrents as thunder played around. All was drenched, but fortunately the inside of the tent remained dry. We did, however, find a disconcerting leak in the back of the Land Rover which had dripped on to the briefcase with all the important documentation. The process of mopping, clearing out the external gutters, and slapping on some sealant occupied our time until the rain stopped. Despite the rain, we had a good night in this intriguing destination and, the following morning, packed up a wet camp and headed back down to the coast.

    We zoomed northwards to Kilwa Masoko where we went to look at a potential campsite. At the lodge cum campsite perched on a headland overlooking a bay, we were warmly welcomed and had delicious grilled prawns for lunch. The campsite, however, had little shade and no breeze and was a short hike up from the beach. We decided to go and look at another hotel and found the delightful breezy Kimbilio Lodge. We decided to forsake camping for a banda right on the beach – ten steps from bed to sea – for a birthday treat for Hugh. Six years ago, we came to Kilwa to visit the historic Kilwa Kisiwani, so we are back in known territory. Kilwa Kisiwani was, in the Middle Ages, the most important trading city on the East African coast with links to Great Zimbabwe, amongst other places. So, having seen the fascinating ruins on the nearby island before, yesterday we went to see Kilwa Kivinje – which replaced Kilwa Kisiwani in the mid nineteenth century, but now languishes in tropical decrepitude. The Germans built a boma there overlooking the small harbour: there was some work being done on the crumbling building, and sitting amongst the debris was a splendid cannon. It is now little more than a fishing village, but there are some other atmospheric ruins from both the German and British colonial periods including a terrific German memorial. Apparently, it is to two Germans who were killed by locals after an altercation about a dead warthog and Muslim sensibilities.

    Tomorrow we are heading north again to Dar-es-Salaam, although we are dreading the notorious Dar traffic.

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    The Haven of Peace
    Tanzania, 7-8 December 2014

    is the translation of Dar-es-Salaam, although, being the commercial capital of Tanzania and the major port, it is anything but peaceful nowadays. From Kilwa, we zoomed north on a reasonable tarmac road (infinitely better than when we drove it six years ago), crossed the Rufiji River (where the German battleship Königsberg was scuttled in the First War) to just south of Dar-es-Salaam. Here we found Kipepeo Lodge and campsite. It was very hot and humid, so we were thankful that the campsite was overlooking a beach. Being a Sunday, the beach was pretty busy with families – mainly expatriates – enjoying a day out of the city, but come evening most people had departed. However, in rolled the overland trucks and disgorged their bewildered and hot passengers. We set up our tent on the coolest, shadiest part of the campsite and, apart from loud music from a nearby establishment, we had a good night.

    This morning, we rose at 4am and were on the road an hour later. We have a policy of not driving in the dark, but dawn was approaching and the reason for the early start was to avoid a huge queue for the ferry into the centre of Dar, and the notorious traffic. This was a good call, and we were through the centre, and past the log jam of Ubongo bus station, before things really hotted up. It did mean, however, that the up-country buses caught us up as they raced each other – taking absurd risks – to their far-flung destinations. We survived the onslaught of maniac buses and arrived in Morogoro with our nerves in shreds, but otherwise intact. Morogoro is a lively town in the foothills of the Uluguru Mountains, and the surrounding area is the fruit and vegetable basket for Dar-es-Salaam. Here in the hills, it is infinitely cooler. We did a resupply of food and cash in the town, and looked for a campsite. We found an empty old hotel that did offer camping, but opted instead for a room in a hotel. The New Acropol Hotel is anything but new: the building was converted from a 1940s sisal manager’s house and has deep verandahs, wooden windows and is packed with charm; it is, however, on a busy main road.

    Tomorrow we are heading to the Udzungwa Mountains for some serious birdwatching, we hope. Both the Udzungwas and Ulugurus are part of a series of hill/mountain ranges known as the Eastern Arc – which also include the Usambaras, Pares, and the Kenyan Taita Hills – and are home to endemic flora and fauna, and are serious Meccas for birdwatchers.

    We are due back on the Coast near Pangani on 15 December when we are going to stay with a friend, so we have time to do more exploring of the places we haven’t been to before in Tanzania. Sadly in many ways, but exciting in others, we are now in the last two weeks of our Great Adventure – 20 years of talking, five years of planning, and 14 months on the road…

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    The Udzungwas and Ulugurus
    Tanzania, 9-14 December 2014

    Six years ago, in the Usambara mountains, we met a Brit* who was obviously a serious birdwatcher. He told us he was “mopping up Eastern Arc endemics from 20 years ago”. So, we have been mopping up endemics too, with less success but more enjoyment, we think. And I am not actually sure that ‘mopping up’ is the right term – we have barely got round to wetting the mop yet.

    The Udzungwas lie down a rather attractive valley, which opens up to a great open area of sugar cane plantations, with the hills, covered in pristine indigenous forest on its Western side. We took one of the National Park campsites (and we always resolved never to complain about East African park fees, so…), and undertook two lovely walks to waterfalls hidden up on the mountainside. It was warm and humid, and we were quickly soaked in sweat: I thought I was going to spontaneously combust. On the first morning, we set off with our guide for what we thought was going to be a short early morning bird walk, but 5 ½ hours later we got back to camp. We had, however, been up to a fabulous waterfall and through glorious thick indigenous forest with huge trees supported by their buttress roots.

    We had a good, but hot night in our forest glade campsite and, the following day, we set off much earlier for a shorter morning bird walk in the vicinity of our camp, and were back in time to cook a full English breakfast. Later that morning, we went with our guide to walk up to Sanje waterfall. We sweated our way up to the viewpoint and it is, indeed, a fabulous waterfall even though we, apparently, were only seeing the lower of three falls. The complete hike up to the top and back again would have taken about 6 hours, and we felt that our energy levels weren’t quite up to that so, we walked down to the base of the falls instead. It was a lovely spot with what looked like a perfect swimming pool, but we didn’t have our swimming cosies with us.

    On our way back from the base of the falls, we passed a school party on their way down. What had been a perfect day up till then became marred by tragedy. As we got back up to the viewpoint, a young man came running up from the base of the falls with the appalling news that someone had sunk and couldn’t be found. We felt that without a rope, and the fact that more than 15 minutes had passed, there was little we could do, but our guide phoned the HQ and rushed down to the base of the falls to take control. We went back to where our Land Rover was parked, and found the rangers had arrived and were about to head up for the one hour plus walk. They, however, had no equipment with them and we gave them a long rope. Later, a message was relayed down that we should go back to our camp. Later that evening, we heard what had happened: one of the students of the school party had gone on to a rock to take a photo, slipped and fallen into the deep part of the pool, and couldn’t swim. A teacher (who also couldn’t swim) went in after him, but got sucked into a cave, and it was he who drowned. What a terrible thing to have happened, and the saddest thing of all is that the school is in Bagamoyo on the coast where one would have hoped that everyone could swim.

    On a more cheerful note, we did see some of the Udzungwa endemics. The Iringa red colobus is a splendid monkey; not red all over, but with a red topknot. We searched for the other endemic primate – the Sanje mangabey – but the troop was elsewhere. On the bird front, we saw some fabulous birds, but the wretched forest birds do tend to skulk in the canopy, and we didn’t actually see any Udzungwa endemics, but saw some birds new to us. All in all, bar the tragedy, we had a lovely three nights in this gloriously preserved indigenous forest. Apparently, the forest has survived due to there being many traditional healers in the Kilombero valley who use plants from the forest for their potions, and various myths and taboos in relation to the forest have been passed down the centuries. However, things are not quite so rosy nowadays with many new migrants to the area – working on the sugar cane estates – who are not so susceptible to the old ways, and the area of the mountains outside the National Park has been cleared for cultivation.

    The road to the Udzungwas runs through Mikumi National Park, a smallish area of savannah. One of the pleasures of hitting this part of the world is how green everything is after the rains, and Mikumi was looking glorious, like English parkland with acacias. Being so green, however, there was little to be seen – a good thing too, as great signs warn one in the strictest terms against any viewing of wildlife or photography while transiting the park on the public road. Further signs highlight the penalties of running over any wild animals: the going rate for an elephant was declared to be US$19,000. The only consolation of this being that one would probably not survive the impact to pay the fine.

    After three nights in the Udzungwa Mountains National Park, we headed back to Morogoro where we, again, treated ourselves to a room in the New Acropol Hotel. We rather like its colonial era shabby chic.

    In Morogoro, we engaged the services of the charming Godwill and Evans – who run a cultural tourism guiding small business – to take us on birdwatching walks in the Uluguru Mountains. The mountains are beautiful, albeit the forest has, of course, been massively reduced. On our first day they took us up to an old German rest house on the slopes above Morogoro, with the rather un-Germanic name of Morningside. A bumpy track took us most of the way, and a further hour and a half was spent, at bird watching speed, climbing up through beautiful small terraces crammed with onions, leeks, strawberries, maize, coco-yams, and bananas, all well irrigated, some with gravity-fed sprinkler systems. The old rest house was sadly run down, but was nonetheless an enchanting spot, with great views down to the town and surrounding plains. Godwill and Evans were frightfully keen for us to see birds and to improve their own knowledge of them, but also found the great game of improving our knowledge of Kiswahili grammar. I at least have quite a good vocabulary, but our inability to correctly classify particular nouns caused endless amusement.

    Today we set off at 0530 to drive around the far side of the mountains to a Catholic Mission named Tigetero. The track from the small town of Kilone hadn’t seen four-wheeled traffic in recent memory, but with a bit of manhandling of fallen boulders, we made it up to the mission. This pre-First War German mission was a paradise, in a bowl of the hills, with indigenous rain forest close round on the surrounding hills, and many small, clear streams. A charming old priest greeted us, and we were joined by a couple of local guides for a trek up into the forest. This was a hot slog up through some rural huts, and steep fields of maize, pineapples, coffee, tomatoes and bananas until we got into the cool of the forest. Up and down through thick forest, we searched for the Uluguru Bush Shrike – one of the endemic birds – but with no luck: we did, however, hear it calling which might be classified as a “tick” to some twitchers. Although the walk through the forest was extremely hard work (primarily, we hope, because we have been sitting in a Land Rover for months), we had a fabulous time and Godwill and Evans were entertaining company as well as competent and thoughtful guides. The two-hour drive back was hard work at the end of the day, but was enhanced by the sight of endless fresh produce being loaded on to trucks. We do feel very privileged to have seen this beautiful indigenous forest and, although there has been a substantial amount of deforestation in the Ulugurus, the remaining forest reserve does appear intact, and the local farmers are terracing the fields and growing cash crops as well as staples for their families. We like the Ulugurus.

    * He actually was the No 1 birdwatcher in the World – Tom Gullick – and he had mounted an expedition to the Congo the previous year with 500 porters. He was obviously wildly wealthy, as well as passionate about birds. If you Google him, you will find he hung up his hat when his total life list of birds seen was over 9,000. We are serious amateurs…

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Last Post on the Road?
    Tanzania, 15-18 December 2014

    From Morogoro and the Ulugurus, we headed back to the Coast. This time, the buses out of Dar-es-Salaam were head on to us, but soon we made the turn north and then only had the maniac Arusha-bound buses overtaking us. We have been to Bagamoyo and Saadani National Park before, so we kept on until we came to a road marked on our map, but not on our GPS. As we are submitting our tracks to Tracks4Africa and, of course, we like mapping and the roads less travelled, we turned off into “white space”. The roughish dirt track took us through Army barracks, and then the track got worse – clearly, it hadn’t been driven on by four wheels for many a long year. However, it was a great adventure and we passed Masai herdsmen who looked at us mad Wazungu and gave cheery waves. Eventually, we popped out of the bundu and into the sisal fields.

    We stayed with a friend on the coast near Pangani and had a lovely time. In the late afternoons, we all went down to the beach for a swim, followed by a drink at one of the few small hotels on Ubongo beach. This part of the Tanzanian coast is pretty undeveloped: in fact, it reminds me of the Kenyan coast 40 years ago.

    After a couple of nights with our friend we headed on North, taking our 17th ferry across the Pangani River, and reaching Tanga in time for a quick resupply and lunch. This was our last view of the Indian Ocean – having first seen it at Cape Agulhas (although, of course, we have seen it many times before and hope to see it many times again).

    Then it was up to the East Usambaras, with a very steep windy track through lovely forest. Here in another of the Eastern Arc mountain ranges, it was blissfully cool once the sun went down. We had been there before six years ago, and after some humming and hawing, we have decided to press on into Kenya and have a couple of nights at Amboseli before we reach Nairobi and the end of our adventure. So, after one night at Amani Nature Reserve deep in the indigenous forest, today we pressed on North. En route, after 14 months and 14 African countries, we had the first explicit demand for money from a policeman. As we had done nothing wrong, and he was simply seeking a Christmas bonus, we stared him down until he waved us on. We are now camping in the gardens of the Marangu Hotel on the lower slopes of Kilimanjaro. We have stayed here before also, in 1991 when we used it as our base to climb the mountain. And it is little changed – lovely gardens, and unassuming but comfy chalets scattered around. We hope the mountain will clear either this evening or tomorrow morning when we drive round the eastern flank of the mountain and cross back into Kenya at Loitokitok.

    This will almost certainly be our last post while on the road. We will next have comms once we have arrived in Nairobi on Sunday.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Thank you so much Wazungu!! Those went down very smoothly indeed. I had come across your Ruvuma crossing account previously. I expect we'll be repeating the experience, however it will be dry season so less soggy.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Thank you WW. I really enjoyed reading those.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by RodS View Post
    Thank you WW. I really enjoyed reading those.
    Hopefully, this will tempt you northwards. Lots of photographic opportunities for your wife.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Earlier in the trip, we circumnavigated Lake Victoria - through Uganda, Rwanda, and part of Tanzania (the southern and eastern sides of Lake Victoria). The following are excerpts from our blog from 27 February to 3 March 2014.

    We entered Tanzania through the Rusumo border from Rwanda, and exited into Kenya through the Serari/Isebania border crossing.


    Hamjambo Tanzania
    Rwanda-Tanzania, 27 February – 1 March 2014

    Once again, the Rwanda-Tanzania border crossing was relatively simple: an hour later we were through into our 11th country, and driving on the right (i.e. left) side of the road once again. An easy drive on some potholed tarmac – and some pristine tarmac – took us to a small town called Biharamulo. Here there is an old German Boma – built by the Germans in 1902 when modern-day Tanzania was German East Africa; thereafter, presumably, it was taken over by the British as their district headquarters. The old German Boma is now partly a ramshackle government guesthouse, and we set up camp in the grounds under the Teutonic ramparts. The Germans built things to last. We were able to spread out all our wet gear and get it dry in the afternoon sun.

    Things were, however, were not going well on the health front. Hugh had six very painful swellings – mostly on his neck and chest – and I had one on my tummy. These had first appeared – to be dismissed as mosquito bites – in Kigali, but we now surmised, correctly as it turned out, that they were Mango/Putsi fly maggots burrowing into us. They would have to be dealt with the following day in Mwanza but, in the interim, the medical kit was deployed to protect the sensitive areas. The Mango Fly lays eggs on damp clothing hanging outside. Normally these are destroyed by ironing (NB those who don’t iron their underwear!), or die after two days. As we had had no laundry done for about a week before our acquisition of these delightful visitors, we strongly suspect the bedding at the guesthouse in Nyungwe might have been responsible for their introduction.

    The next day, we set off on the unknown drive to Mwanza; fortunately, the rough dirt road only lasted 70kms (but we did have to do more bush repairs on the lower link assembly) before we hit pristine Chinese tarmac and whizzed along through verdant countryside and gold mining areas. On the western side of the Mwanza Gulf, we waited some time for the ferry with Hugh looking like Frankenstein’s monster with plasters and dressings hanging off his neck. Also waiting for the ferry were enormously over-laden charcoal lorries and a huge bus. Eventually, the ferry arrived and we had to reverse on to it. Once on the other side in the lake-side town of Mwanza, we sped to the Aga Khan Medical Centre. Luckily, there wasn’t a huge queue and we were seen relatively quickly by a young Tanzanian lady doctor. We were very surprised that she hadn’t heard of Mango fly, but (Health Warning here for the squeamish) when the swellings were squeezed, out popped the maggots. What a relief! We were cleaned up, given antibiotics etc and we sped off to the Mwanza Yacht Club to set up camp before dark. The Mwanza Yacht Club is a delightful functioning club – with a bar and restaurant – overlooking one of the many bays on this part of Lake Victoria. Life was looking good again.

    After a good night’s sleep with no maggots eating into our bodies, we went to the lively and colourful market, resupplied with cash, enquired about ferries to Ukerewe Island (no car ferries at present), and had lunch in the up-market hotel next door to the Yacht Club. We like Mwanza – it has a slightly Mediterranean or coastal feel about it: palm trees abound, and up here at 4,500 feet on Lake Victoria it is not too hot and there is a lovely cool breeze. There isn’t much evidence of its German past except for one Bavarian looking building, and a rocky island in the lake called Bismarck Rocks, but there are a lot of old British colonial buildings and houses.

    Tomorrow we are heading for Ukerewe Island accessing it from the east side of the Lake. The rains haven’t reached here yet, so we hope we are ahead of them again.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Almost Home
    Tanzania, 2-3 March 2014

    From Mwanza, we headed east and then made the turn north following the lake shore. On the north side of Speke Gulf, we turned onto a dirt track towards Ukerewe Island. This road went through green countryside and tiny villages until we got to a very small village with a ferry ramp. There was good news and bad news: the good news was that the small ferry was running; the bad news was that it wasn’t due back for another two hours. We parked up under a tree and waited. More than two hours later, the ferry arrived and we crammed on to it. With time getting on (and the antibiotics having a turbulent effect on Hugh’s tum), we scrapped our original plan of camping on the far west of the island at a forest reserve, and instead set up camp in the beach bar area of a “hotel” grandly called Monarch Beach Resort. The hotel staff were kind and helpful, but we did feel a little odd setting up our tent in the midst of local Sunday family parties. Later in the evening, the hotel and garden became the venue for much smaller parties, neither partner of which was from the same family, we hope. We managed to sleep through it all.

    Ukerewe Island is rather off the beaten track and deeply sleepy and rural. Unfortunately, we didn’t manage to see much of the island in our short time there. We did, however, find out (and see) that there is a car ferry from Mwanza to the island. The lady in Mwanza at the Port Office who we spoke to obviously couldn’t think “out of the box” and her office only sold the government-owned ferry tickets and, yes, they don’t sail to Ukerewe, but there is a private ferry operator running a service. This is Africa…

    Today, we crossed back on to the mainland (another long-ish wait) and are now in the lake-side town of Musoma about 100 kms from the Kenya border. Musoma is functioning and pleasant, and it has an old German Boma which is still in use as the District Headquarters. It is not as big or as imposing as the one in Biharamulo. We have set up camp at a rather nice beach-side campsite (with a few rooms), and have been enjoying watching a flock of pelicans trying to roost in a flimsy treetop in a stiff wind. Pelicans never struck us as perching birds and their efforts rather confirm our prejudgment.

    The following day, we re-entered Kenya through the Sirari/Isebania border crossing, and two days later we were back in Nairobi. We had spent five weeks circumnavigated Lake Victoria.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Thank you so much for taking the trouble of posting your entire UK-Cairo-Cape-Nairobi trip report from your private blog as requested. I gather it is now complete, country by country?

    As stated some of the information might have become dated but I can assure you it will be thoroughly enjoyed by those with an interest in traveling beyond Southern Africa, and there are many. Even if from a few years back it will be an inspiration and give others contemplating a trip such as yours' encouragement, ideas and act as a reference as many things have not changed.
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    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Indeed, thank you very much, WW, for publishing your blog excerpts here! All such information is invaluable for all potential travelers to those areas.

    And also a big thank you to Stan, for requesting and provoking the publishing of those excerpts here on this forum!
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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Thank you Stan and Ortelius. Karibu! It is worth all the hard work editing etc when people reply.

    I have also posted on Uganda and Rwanda in the East Africa section of the forum. I might post on Zimbabwe and Malawi, but don't hold your breath...

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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    I have also posted on Uganda and Rwanda in the East Africa section of the forum. I might post on Zimbabwe and Malawi, but don't hold your breath...
    I've just found this thread WW, I've yet to read through it but you, Stan and Ortelius are an inspiration to us "Southern African" travelers. I will be reading through this later today. Our trip reports are confined to Namibia, Zimbabwe and RSA at present, but would love to add others to the list. Linda and I are in the very early stages of considering an East African tour, we are travelling to South Luangwa and Malawi next year with our Bush Lapa and are thinking of leaving the caravan with friends in Malawi and going up to Tanzania and Kenya from there. Plenty of planning time available to us.

    We are currently travelling around Queensland in Australia and once this Covid nonsense is over will return to our nomadic lifestyle travelling around Southern Africa in our Hilux/Bush Lapa configuration. I will look for your Uganda and Rwanda posts. Did you ever do the Malawi and Zimbabwe posts? We lived in both so would be very keen to read of your trip.

    Many thanks
    John and Linda
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    Default Re: Tanzania: Excerpts from our blog June 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by Tedx2 View Post
    ......Linda and I are in the very early stages of considering an East African tour, we are travelling to South Luangwa and Malawi next year with our Bush Lapa and are thinking of leaving the caravan with friends in Malawi and going up to Tanzania and Kenya from there. Plenty of planning time available to us.......
    John, this plan is strongly recommended. Ruanda and Uganda as well??
    Stanley Weakley.
    Toyota Landcruiser 76SW 4,2L diesel.

    “Great journeys are memorable not so much for what you saw, but for where you camped”.

    Trans East Africa 2015/2016 Trip report https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...-6-SLOW-DONKEY
    OR
    http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/...e16?highlight= from post 315.

  29. The Following User Says Thank You to Stan Weakley For This Useful Post:


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