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Thread: Knife sharpener

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    Quote Originally Posted by wiel View Post
    Last year I took a piece of Tambotie wood to our local knife maker, and after seeing how quick and sharp he sharpens a knife on a belt sander I decided right there to built one.
    Now it is a pleasure to sharpen a knife, coming from a oil stone, then Lansky/Gatco and V-sharp(I gave them away).
    To slice through paper with a blade means nothing. Hold a piece of paper between thump and finger. Now take the blade and just press down on the paper with out a sliding action. It should cut into the paper with ease and without folding the paper over. Do it with the back, middle and tip.
    Wiel, why would one be able to "Hold a piece of paper between thump and finger. Now take the blade and just press down on the paper with out a sliding action. It should cut into the paper with ease and without folding the paper over"? Where do one need that sharpness? I believe one should aim for a balance between an edge staying sufficiently sharp, opposed to extremely (brittle) sharp. The one has a seven day sharpness lifespan in a kitchen, the other half a day, if that.

    What is the point of having a blade sharpened down to a micro millimeter thickness at the edge? I can understand a surgeon needing a cutting edge that sharp - he throws the scalpel away after the incision, but for all practical purposes, to sharpen a blade like that means the angle must be so small, it breaks its tip off at the first encounter of real resistance. Wusthof sharpens their Classic blades at 14 degrees for an expected seven day kitchen use.

    Also, grindstones or belt sanders chows a lot of material away, similar to some sharpening devices. Compare the life expectancy of a blade that get touched up with a strop with touching it up with a belt sander.

    Sure, I can understand the need for a knife maker to use a belt sander, but for re sharpening or touch-up work? I think not.

    Make no mistake, I admire your ability to build a sander like that, and would not mind having one, but mine will be for drill bits.
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  2. #62
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    Quote Originally Posted by Poen View Post
    Wiel, why would one be able to "Hold a piece of paper between thump and finger. Now take the blade and just press down on the paper with out a sliding action. It should cut into the paper with ease and without folding the paper over"? Where do one need that sharpness? I believe one should aim for a balance between an edge staying sufficiently sharp, opposed to extremely (brittle) sharp. The one has a seven day sharpness lifespan in a kitchen, the other half a day, if that.

    What is the point of having a blade sharpened down to a micro millimeter thickness at the edge? I can understand a surgeon needing a cutting edge that sharp - he throws the scalpel away after the incision, but for all practical purposes, to sharpen a blade like that means the angle must be so small, it breaks its tip off at the first encounter of real resistance. Wusthof sharpens their Classic blades at 14 degrees for an expected seven day kitchen use.

    Also, grindstones or belt sanders chows a lot of material away, similar to some sharpening devices. Compare the life expectancy of a blade that get touched up with a strop with touching it up with a belt sander.

    Sure, I can understand the need for a knife maker to use a belt sander, but for re sharpening or touch-up work? I think not.

    Make no mistake, I admire your ability to build a sander like that, and would not mind having one, but mine will be for drill bits.
    Some good points here, but then again, it comes down to what steel the blade is made of, if you are sharpening Aus8 or 440C, then yes I agree, a razor edge won't last. But when you move on to more sophisticated steel such as M390, Elmax etc I feel it is worth the effort to get it really sharp as it will hold that edge very well.

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  4. #63
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    Quote Originally Posted by Poen View Post
    Wiel, why would one be able to "Hold a piece of paper between thump and finger. Now take the blade and just press down on the paper with out a sliding action. It should cut into the paper with ease and without folding the paper over"? Where do one need that sharpness? I believe one should aim for a balance between an edge staying sufficiently sharp, opposed to extremely (brittle) sharp. The one has a seven day sharpness lifespan in a kitchen, the other half a day, if that.

    What is the point of having a blade sharpened down to a micro millimeter thickness at the edge? I can understand a surgeon needing a cutting edge that sharp - he throws the scalpel away after the incision, but for all practical purposes, to sharpen a blade like that means the angle must be so small, it breaks its tip off at the first encounter of real resistance. Wusthof sharpens their Classic blades at 14 degrees for an expected seven day kitchen use.

    Also, grindstones or belt sanders chows a lot of material away, similar to some sharpening devices. Compare the life expectancy of a blade that get touched up with a strop with touching it up with a belt sander.

    Sure, I can understand the need for a knife maker to use a belt sander, but for re sharpening or touch-up work? I think not.

    Make no mistake, I admire your ability to build a sander like that, and would not mind having one, but mine will be for drill bits.
    It's what men do!
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  6. #64
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    A knife doesn't always have to be razor sharp. It just has to be sharp enough. I've given up on razor sharp kitchen knives a long time ago, because after trimming a big piece of meat it'll be too blunt to use, and I have to go back to sharpening. Now I sharpen them to "sharp enough", meaning it can do the task easily enough without struggle, yet hold the edge.

    PS I need to get a magnetic knife holder thingy or a knife block. I know why my knives lose their edges - it's because of the fact they're all clunked into the same drawer.

    I actually have a very old knife with a wooden handle. It was picked up off the street in some dorpie 15 years ago. It's got a stainless blade, but it's a "different" steel. It's some English company that made it, will have to check the brand. The steel is pretty hard on the edge, but also surprisingly springy. It's one HELL of a knife to work meat with. I love it to bits. I currently swipe it over 2,000 grit sandpaper before use and it seems to work pretty well.

  7. #65
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    Quote Originally Posted by Poen View Post
    Wiel, why would one be able to "Hold a piece of paper between thump and finger. Now take the blade and just press down on the paper with out a sliding action. It should cut into the paper with ease and without folding the paper over"? Where do one need that sharpness? I believe one should aim for a balance between an edge staying sufficiently sharp, opposed to extremely (brittle) sharp. The one has a seven day sharpness lifespan in a kitchen, the other half a day, if that.

    What is the point of having a blade sharpened down to a micro millimeter thickness at the edge? I can understand a surgeon needing a cutting edge that sharp - he throws the scalpel away after the incision, but for all practical purposes, to sharpen a blade like that means the angle must be so small, it breaks its tip off at the first encounter of real resistance. Wusthof sharpens their Classic blades at 14 degrees for an expected seven day kitchen use.

    Also, grindstones or belt sanders chows a lot of material away, similar to some sharpening devices. Compare the life expectancy of a blade that get touched up with a strop with touching it up with a belt sander.

    Sure, I can understand the need for a knife maker to use a belt sander, but for re sharpening or touch-up work? I think not.

    Make no mistake, I admire your ability to build a sander like that, and would not mind having one, but mine will be for drill bits.
    Poen I like sharp knives and that is how I grew up. It is just a pleasure to work with it (especially with soft fish). The blade quality,the sharpening angle and the surface you work on will depend on how long it will stay sharp. I have not broken or chipped a blade since using this belt sander.

    The sander remove very little metal if you use it correctly. On most of my knives it takes two light passes on the belt, a pull or two on the strop and it is sharp(the knives with premium blades takes a little longer) . I have a adjustable guide that I use to keep the angle consistent. It also depends on what grid I use. A well worn 400 grid belt just polishes a blade to ultra sharp, where a new belt is used to get a very blunt knife up to standard.
    I sharpen knives for friends and family, and you will be shocked to see the state of some of those knives that have been sharpened on these fancy cheap gadgets. It does more damage to the blade than anything else.

    I grew up with a oil stone and still have it, but sometimes good technology is just better and faster.
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  9. #66
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnna View Post
    Some good points here, but then again, it comes down to what steel the blade is made of, if you are sharpening Aus8 or 440C, then yes I agree, a razor edge won't last. But when you move on to more sophisticated steel such as M390, Elmax etc I feel it is worth the effort to get it really sharp as it will hold that edge very well.
    Very true. It is all about the quality of the blade.
    98 Hilux 2.8D D/C 4x4

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  11. #67
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    I suppose if one refers to levels of sharpness one should relate it to the type of steel involved.

    I get the impression that the absolute best steels available is not the viable option for commercially viable products.
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  12. #68
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    Default Re: Knife sharpener

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eTouareg View Post
    Ouch!!!
    You should be able to bring it in yourself for half that price...
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