Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest





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    Default Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    There is very little on this forum about Kenya - which is surprising. However, I will endeavour to whet a few appetites. Kenya has an astonishing diversity of landscape: from the glaciers of Mount Kenya to the white beaches of the Indian Ocean; from the lunar landscape surrounding the alkaline Lake Turkana to the freshwater Lake Victoria; from the savannahs of the Maasai Mara to the afro-alpine moorlands of the Aberdares; from the Rift Valley lakes to the heavily forested escarpments; from the tea plantations of western Kenya to the tropical coastal forests; from the sugar-growing Nyanza Basin to the Kakamega rainforest; from the fertile central highlands to the deserts and mountains of northern Kenya.

    The iconic wildlife destinations in Kenya are well documented: the Maasai Mara Game Reserve, Tsavo East and Tsavo West National Parks, Amboseli National Park, Meru National Park, Samburu National Reserve, and the private game conservancies of the Laikipia Plateau, but there are many more places where wildlife flourishes, the landscapes are awe-inspiring, and a traditional lifestyle continues as it has done for millennia. “Old Africa” is still out there.

    But very little is written about northern Kenya. Although there is not an administrative division called “northern Kenya”, in most people’s eyes, northern Kenya is all the land north of Mount Kenya and includes parts of the former Rift Valley, Eastern and North Eastern Provinces. The 2010 Constitution provided for counties to be formed as units of devolved government with county governors and county assemblies. However, most people still think in terms of provinces.

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    This northern part of the country covers more than half of Kenya and is inhabited by a number of pastoral nomadic tribes – the Samburu, Turkana, El Molo, Rendille, Boran, and Gabra. Life is tough for these communities in the semi-desert: cattle-rustling and tribal conflict - as well as poaching - was rife as the people struggled to make ends meet.

    ​To be continued...

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    In 2004 the Northern Rangelands Trust was formed to help remote communities with a mission to “develop resilient community conservancies which transform people’s lives, secure peace and conserve natural resources. It does this in a number of ways. It raises funds for the conservancies. It provides them with advice on how to manage their affairs. It supports a wide range of training and helps broker agreements between conservancies and investors. It also monitors performance, providing donors with a degree of oversight and quality assurance”. With the assistance of the Northern Rangelands Trust, 33 community conservancies have been formed which cover more than 44,000 sq kms and 400,000 people.

    More information on this exemplary organisation can be found on their website at http://www.nrt-kenya.org/


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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    A short foray to the Mukogodo Forest

    However, this trip report is about a three night trip to an area which most Kenyans have never even heard of – the Mukogodo Forest on the edge of the Laikipia Plateau.

    Background

    We have been lucky enough to have visited most places in Kenya, but we had never been to the Mukogodo Forest which is on the edge of the Laikipia Plateau looking north to the Mathews Range, the Ewaso Nyiro River, Samburu Game Reserve, and the iconic northern mountain of Ololokwe. The Mukogodo Forest, however, is not for those seeking to see the “Big Five” – this is off-the-beaten track and rarely visited by Kenyans let alone foreigners. There is wildlife in the forest - which is a dry season refuge for elephant - but a visit here is to marvel at the wonderful views north (and south-east to Mt Kenya), and to walk in the forest.

    The Mukogodo Forest is one of Kenya’s largest remaining dry forests - 70,000 acres of natural indigenous forest with 170 identified vegetation species including podo, olive and cedar clothed in lichens and orchids. Since time immemorial, the forest has been conserved by the Mukogodo who were hunter-gatherers, spoke Yaaku (a Cushitic language) and lived a semi-nomadic existence making homes in rock shelters. In the 1920s under British colonial rule, the Mukogodo found themselves in increasing contact with the Maasai and quickly adopted key elements of their higher-status culture. Today, pastoralism is the life-blood of the community who are now named the Mukogodo-Maasai.

    The Mukogodo Forest is a gazetted forest reserve and is not one of the Northern Rangelands Trust community conservancies. However, their private game conservancy neighbours, the NRT and other organisations have assisted the community in setting up rangers, anti-poaching, and campsites amongst other initiatives.

    Getting There

    We had an easy three hour drive from Nairobi to Nanyuki on a good tarmac road. At Nanyuki, as always, we stopped at Barney’s cafe at the Nanyuki airstrip which is a few kilometres before one crosses the equator. This famous Nanyuki stopover serves good food and is popular with farmers, ranchers, tourists waiting for their light aircraft transfers to whisk them off to exclusive lodges all over Kenya, bush pilots, and British Army helicopter pilots. Safari vehicles of all shapes and sizes are parked outside. Nanyuki has grown enormously over the years, but it still maintains an air of a frontier farming town: it has a Nakumatt supermarket, banks, fuel stations, garages, numerous small shops, a golf club – in fact, all the civilisation one needs. Nanyuki is most people’s base for climbing Mt Kenya, as well as visiting the well-known private game conservancies on the Laikipia Plateau.

    Our GPS route to and from Nanyuki to the Mukogodo Forest can be viewed here. From the boundary with Borana, the tracks weren’t on T4A. However, we have submitted our tracks to T4A.

    Fortified with lunch and fuel, we headed further north to Timau where we turned off the tarmac on to a rough-ish dirt road. This took us through arable and ranching land until we came to the gates of Borana Ranch and Game Conservancy. The public road goes through Borana Ranch, but one is not allowed to go for a game drive in their conservancy or visit their fabulous and exclusive Borana Lodge unless one has a reservation. However, we did see a large herd of elephant whilst transiting the ranch. At the north end of Borana is the Nadungor Police Post. We had arranged to meet the Mukogodo Community Liaison Ranger, Benson, here. I had telephoned Benson a week before to arrange our visit. He can be contacted on +254 (0)710-788142. Benson hopped into the Land Rover and guided us another hour or so’s drive through open plains inhabited by the Mukogodo Maasai and into the forest. The road is rough and 4x4 clearance is essential. Good tyres are also essential particularly when driving through the forest with all the fallen branches and sharp sticks.

    Practicalities

    We elected to camp at Nkijabe. It must be borne in mind that the two campsites in the Mukogodos are effectively pieces of Africa and are very rarely used; go equipped for wild camping and with full water tanks and jerrycans of water. Nkijabe campsite has been used in recent memory, the area is cleared with a flat space for tents and vehicles, and there is a place for a fire and it does, in fact, have a bush long drop (complete with seat which is hidden in the bushes with no building). The setting sun falls directly on the campsite and less than a 100m away is a rocky viewpoint with the most fabulous view north to the Mathews Range and Ololokwe. The keen-sighted will be able to spot, far below, Tassia (a lovely eco-lodge in the neighbouring Lekurruki Conservation Trust land), and the Ewaso Nyiro river in the distance.

    We paid Benson KShs 2,000 per person per night and received an official receipt. Furthermore, we employed a “Mzee” (Swahili for old man) for KShs 1,000 per 24 hours. It is probably not necessary to have a Mzee, but he was great at collecting firewood, lighting the fire and keeping the herd boys away from our camp during the day whilst we were out walking and exploring. He was a lovely old man – brush up on your Swahili before you go – and we were told it was a community initiative to help the elderly earn some money. Being experienced Kenyan campers, we had taken with us a bag of maize meal, a kilo of sugar, a packet of tea, and a tin of Kimbo: the Mzee was very pleased (we also shared our meat with him, but he turned his nose up at a full English breakfast). He came with nothing and we lent him a blanket, a tarpaulin, a pot and a plate, and supplied him with buckets of water. An armed guard (askari) was delivered by “boda-boda” (motorbike) every night and Benson told us to pay him KShs 1000 per night. However, when the Chief came to call, he let slip that KShs500 is the rate overnight!

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Exploring the Mukogodo Forest: 28-31 August 2016

    We set up camp, the Mzee lit the campfire and we had our sundowners on the rock at the viewpoint. It had been unseasonably cold in Nairobi and it was great to feel some warmth. With no light pollution, the stars were sensational.

    On our first full day, we went for a short walk in the forest nearby on our own – much to the consternation of the Mzee. Later in the afternoon - because we had so many extra mouths to feed - we drove back around 8 kms to collect more water from the borehole at Lukuseru, and after doing that, we went on a short drive down the "road" to Tassia, to inspect a campsite that had been reported on the Laikipia Wildlife Forum. The campsite no longer exists and the track is not really viable anymore and definitely not to be recommended as a route to Tassia or Il Ngwesi. Back at camp, we had another good night at Nkijabe with a blazing fire.

    The following day, we had arranged with Benson for a guide to take us walking in the forest (we paid him KShs500). In the morning, we had a two hour walk to another lovely viewpoint looking north and saw much evidence of recent elephant activity in the forest, but we didn’t see actually see any. The whole area was very dry and we were told that the long rains had failed this year and there hadn’t been any rain since December 2015.

    After lunch back at camp, we drove about 8 kms back to Lukuseru and about 2 kms through thick forest and bush to check out the other campsite in the Mukogodos. This campsite is called Sarara and is on the Borana side of the forest. Sarara is completely different to Nkijabe - acres and acres of flat ground with the forest surrounding the plain all round. It has a fabulous view of Mt Kenya. There are no facilities at Sarara and, again, it is very rarely used, but it is a wonderful spot for larger parties. We went for a sensational two hour walk in the forest with the guide, Alex. On this side of the hills, the trees were bigger and there were more cedars. Sarara is obviously very rarely used and the track is very overgrown - we did wonder whether we ought to have taken a chainsaw. After our walk in the pristine forest at Sarara, we made our way back to Nkijabe with a minor hiatus of a puncture en route (caused by a sharp stick in a weak point in our already rather battered rear tyres). Everyone in the Mukogodos were friendly and helpful, and there is no begging or causing a nuisance. That evening, the Chief came to call. He was very circumspect and waited by the Mzee and guard’s camp fire until asked to join us for a cup of tea. He spoke good English and had been in the Kenyan Army before taking up the administrative position of Chief.

    After a wonderful three nights in the Mukogodos, early in the morning we struck camp and headed back to Nairobi. Just after the Equator sign on the outskirts of Nanyuki - when we were looking forward to a late breakfast at Barney’s - the Land Rover came to a grinding halt with a terrible “chakachaka” sound and no forward movement. Hugh hitched a ride back into Nanyuki whilst I sat on the roadside with flashers going and warning triangles out. In the end, all was resolved with the help of the ever resourceful and helpful Titch who runs a garage and workshop (Mamba Motors) in the backstreets of Nanyuki. Titch was in the British Army’s REME, knows Land Rovers intimately and has settled in Kenya. In fact, we had the spare part - the rear drive shaft member - Titch’s mechanic was set to work, we had coffee and a lovely chat with him and his wife, and we were on the road again with time to spare for lunch at Barney’s and to get back to Nairobi before dark.

    All in all, another wonderful trip to the lovely northern Kenya.


    Other Web-based Resources for Northern Kenya

    Laikipia Wildlife Forum tourism: http://www.laikipiatourism.com/
    Laikipia Wildlife Forum: http://www.laikipia.org/
    The Milgis Trust: http://www.milgistrustkenya.com/
    The Kenyan Camper (a young Kenyan who blogs about camping in Kenya): https://thekenyancamper.com/
    The Northern Rangelands Trust: http://www.nrt-kenya.org/

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  9. #5
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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Thanks M. for sharing. A really lovely report and I know you will continue to update on and promote Kenya and East Africa.
    I just want to warn you that a clamour for pics will follow this report so why don't you preempt this and post some.
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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Thank you for taking the trouble

    It is always difficult to find the nice unknown places
    I am impressed by the background as it is often hard to find and the further info links

    This seems like something for the bucket list

    While you are in the vicinity, please do some more of the same area that one can include in one trip

    Kind regards
    Pieter

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

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    The track into Nkijabe campsite (we saw a Narina Trogon here)
    Sorry, can't get this to turn!


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    Nkijabe campsite, Mukogodo Forest

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    The view north from Nkijabe viewpoint (it was very hazy, but the Mathews Range is just visible)

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    Sunset from Nkijabe campsite

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    Collecting more water at the Lukuseru borehole

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    The main track into the Mukogodo Forest

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    The "road" to Tassia (not to be recommended), but the forest is beautiful

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    Alex the ranger at a viewpoint looking north

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    The vast open space at Sarara campsite

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    Coming out of the forest - look carefully and you will see Mt Kenya

    Thanks, Stan, I was working on the photos when your post came in! Anybody any idea how I can make the photos bigger?


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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Their size is fine - click on them to get to full size. Thanks for the report, it's a wonderful part of Kenya.
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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Thanks for the detailed report. Always good to get information on destinations you wouldn't otherwise find.

    I empathise on the grinding to a halt episode. We stripped the flange and lost 4WD in the hills of northern Ethiopia... in the middle of the rains. Suffered the indignity (and terror) of having to be towed through the mud by a road grader...

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Quote Originally Posted by itchyfeet View Post

    I empathise on the grinding to a halt episode. We stripped the flange and lost 4WD in the hills of northern Ethiopia... in the middle of the rains. Suffered the indignity (and terror) of having to be towed through the mud by a road grader...
    How terrifying. Those Ethiopian roads are not a place to come to a grinding halt. Pole sana! If it ever happens to you again, engage diff lock and drive (very slowly) to somewhere where you can replace the drive shaft member. We were lucky it happened where it did. Three hours earlier and it would have been a real pain to sort out...

    Thanks for reading my trip report on what was a short safari, but to a very special area of northern Kenya.

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    What a great report. Haven't heard about the forest but now I really want to make a stop there next time im "up north". Nothern Kenya truly is enchanting to say the least.

    Would you say its manageable to do a day trip to the nkijabe camp for a walk in the forest and the views if one is staying in borana?
    Also a friend just opened a gas station in south horr! Clean diesel and petrol available. Just in case!

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Quote Originally Posted by atakanmerdin View Post
    Would you say its manageable to do a day trip to the nkijabe camp for a walk in the forest and the views if one is staying in borana?
    Also a friend just opened a gas station in south horr! Clean diesel and petrol available. Just in case!
    Thanks, atakanmerdin. The forest is on the northern boundary of Borana. It won't take more than an hour and a half to get to Nkijabe from Borana Lodge. Arrange with the Mukogodo Community Liaison Ranger, Benson for an armed guide beforehand. It would be very easy to get lost in the forest and there is wildlife so better safe than sorry!

    South Horr is a long, long way from the Mukogodo Forest, but good to know there is a fuel station there for next time I head up to Lake Turkana.

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Quote Originally Posted by atakanmerdin View Post
    Also a friend just opened a gas station in south horr! Clean diesel and petrol available. Just in case!
    This is indeed important news for those wanting to tackle the eastern Lake Turkana route. When heading north the last fuel used to be in Maralal. Then last year we found a new fuel station had opened up in the next village north, Baragoi.
    South Horr should cut the range required to Jinka in Ethiopia by a further 50km.
    According to my estimates the distance between fuel stations will now be cut to about 850km from what a few years ago was close to 1,000km.

    I am just wondering if it is the developement of the oil reserves along Turkana that is driving all of this. I fear that the isolation is becoming a thing of the past.
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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Unless South Horr has been connected to the electricity grid (which I doubt), the fuel will be either hand pumped or with the aid of a generator - or in barrels. If I were heading north to Ethiopia, I would still go tanked up with enough fuel for over 1,000 kms just in case.

    Times are a-changing in the eastern Lake Turkana area not only with prospecting for oil, but also the huge wind farm project (and the pylons required for connecting to the grid).

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Wazungu where do you stay?
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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Quote Originally Posted by Barend D View Post
    Wazungu where do you stay?
    Why do you ask?

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Quote Originally Posted by Wazungu Wawili View Post
    Why do you ask?
    Just asking. I'm live in Nairobi
    2013 Ford Ranger 3.2 Supercab 4x4

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    We live in the UK, but I am Kenya born and bred. We come out to Kenya twice a year to visit my family. When we are in Nairobi we are based in Karen. Otherwise, we are visiting friends up-country - or on safari.

    Obviously, you aren't - as your details say - in South Africa. How long have you been in Kenya?

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Been here for a total of 3 years. Currently more than a year. There are so many South Africans living in Karen. This place is so beautiful and absolutely awesome for overlanding
    2013 Ford Ranger 3.2 Supercab 4x4

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    Default Re: Off-the-beaten track Kenya: A short trip to the Mukogodo Forest

    Quote Originally Posted by Barend D View Post
    This place is so beautiful and absolutely awesome for overlanding
    Indeed it is. It would be lovely to hear about your trips around Kenya - even if a short safari.

    Safari njema!

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