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  1. #1
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    Default Microlight training and flying

    Hi all, this is a big dream of mine to start flying.

    So I would like to do my Micro light license but I do not really like the open air thing and samoosa shape LOL!!!


    So I would like to find out if the Sonex Waiex and SD-2 Sport master falls under the micro light class, can you fly them with only a micro light license.

    Then are this planes only available as kits or can you buy them ready to fly and what is the price range of said planes.

    Are there other planes in the same size like the above mentioned I can have a look at.

    I know I have to first get flying time and my license and all but I would like to start doing more research on small planes.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    My suggestion instead of microlight open air thing go Ultralight like the thunderbird which has a canopy and sits side by side, also has flaps and three axis control so if you wanted to move onto aircraft it would be easier.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    I enjoy the "open cockpit samosa shape thing". Flying a dacron sail low and slow is a very real way to experience powered flight.

    Besides, you get some pretty modern and powerful trikes out there, like Quikr, GT450, Quantum Pegasus, Cobra, Revo, etc.

    But on your NPL you can also do the LSA rating. Google kitfox, jabiru SP, ekolot, bushbaby, bush cat, etc.

    Same license(NPL), different rating. More hours required to get your NPL on LSA than weigh shift.
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    Check out Airborne African Adventures. They train people on bathawks (used for a lot of anti poaching operations). Very similar look to the thunderbird mentioned above.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    In the LSA class I would seriously consider a Sling. Being locally built helps so much when it comes to parts, also really cheap to maintain. It's so nice and easy to fly. It can always be placed in a flight school to recover costs.
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    If your dream is to fly aeroplanes save up and start with doing your PPL (private pilots licence ) exams first, get them over with then do your 45 hours flying as required.

    After that hat you can get your microlight licence but I think only 12-15 hours may only be counted towards your PPL or your hours so not really worth it.

    different countries have different regulations on this (FAA American or EASA Europe) find out as much as information as possible. Get advice from the South African Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) or your closest flying school.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    Thanks, So with your MPL you are not allowed to fly something like an jabiru SP?
    Don't they fall in the same class as a micro light?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    No you not. You will need atleast a NPL.

    Do take note that certain licences does not allow you to cross borders
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    have a look here for a start

    http://www.avcom.co.za/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=85213

    http://borderaviation.co.za/flight-s...t-licence-npl/

    Its all to do with the weight of the aircraft which puts it into different categories

    National Pilot Licence (NPL)

    The National Pilot Licence is ideal for recreational pilots. While you are limited to flying aircraft in the Light Sport Aircraft (LSA), Conventionally Controlled Microlight (CCM) or Weight-shift Controlled Microlight (WCM) categories, it remains the most affordable way to get in the air! The NPL does not allow you to fly for reward or remuneration, or outside the borders of South Africa.

    Aircraft in this Category are:

    • (LSA) Light Sport Aircraft, maximum weight 600kg
    • (CCM) Conventional Controlled Microlight, maximum weight 450kg
    • (WCM) Weight Controlled Microlight


      Private Pilot Licence (PPL)

      The Private Pilot Licence is less restrictive than the NPL, allowing you to fly larger and faster aircraft and take your aviation adventure beyond the borders of South Africa. It also allows you to enhance your skills with additional ratings such as the night rating, instrument rating or multi-engine rating.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    Thanks for the info will go thru it and read up a bit more.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    Quote Originally Posted by ngweshla View Post
    have a look here for a start

    http://www.avcom.co.za/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=85213

    http://borderaviation.co.za/flight-s...t-licence-npl/

    Its all to do with the weight of the aircraft which puts it into different categories

    National Pilot Licence (NPL)

    The National Pilot Licence is ideal for recreational pilots. While you are limited to flying aircraft in the Light Sport Aircraft (LSA), Conventionally Controlled Microlight (CCM) or Weight-shift Controlled Microlight (WCM) categories, it remains the most affordable way to get in the air! The NPL does not allow you to fly for reward or remuneration, or outside the borders of South Africa.

    Aircraft in this Category are:

    • (LSA) Light Sport Aircraft, maximum weight 600kg
    • (CCM) Conventional Controlled Microlight, maximum weight 450kg
    • (WCM) Weight Controlled Microlight


      Private Pilot Licence (PPL)

      The Private Pilot Licence is less restrictive than the NPL, allowing you to fly larger and faster aircraft and take your aviation adventure beyond the borders of South Africa. It also allows you to enhance your skills with additional ratings such as the night rating, instrument rating or multi-engine rating.

    Hi. Does this mean that you can do NPL training with a microlight? For example a Quicksilver mx11?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    Hi Ngweshla,

    Go onto Avcom site (Google), you will find all the info there and also see what planes are on the market. If budget allows, go for a PPL (Two seaters and more), you can also do your LSA license (Only up to two seater planes). You can then fly as per previous reply. "Samoosa" shape will give you only a license to fly a weight shift machine, when you then want to convert to a 3 axis (Cessna, Sling, Jabiru, Technam, Bantam and many more) you need to go through the whole license again, barring some hour discount on actual flying, if I remember correctly.

    At the end it is all up to you, what do you want to get out of it. "Samoosas" are great for sight seeing and enjoying flying at relative cheap cost. Get someone to take you up for a flip and get the feel of it, weight shift and 3 axis. Flying is great.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Microlight training and flying

    Sorry, Meant : "Hi, DJLSchoemm, ......."

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